Author Topic: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?  (Read 2767 times)

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Offline achtungx

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2017, 09:38:31 AM »
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As a yinzer, I wish I was old enough to have been to Three Rivers Stadium.

On a side note, I've never been able to find photos of that Pittsburgh PopMart show. I want to see what the stadium looked like with the giant lemon!

2/3 full... Three Rivers Stadium would've looked 2/3 full. :)

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2017, 01:53:33 PM »
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As a yinzer, I wish I was old enough to have been to Three Rivers Stadium.

On a side note, I've never been able to find photos of that Pittsburgh PopMart show. I want to see what the stadium looked like with the giant lemon!

2/3 full... Three Rivers Stadium would've looked 2/3 full. :)

Better than 1/3 I suppose.

Offline Saint1322

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2017, 03:57:39 PM »
For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 03:59:26 PM by Saint1322 »

Offline il_capo

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2017, 06:23:50 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

Offline JTNash

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #49 on: February 07, 2017, 06:53:15 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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ah I was at this show too, do not remember a thing but puking at nickajack lake rest stop on the way home. Huge regret! I have been upset with my 20 something self about this for 20ish years! Warning to you kids, around here.

Offline achtungx

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2017, 07:28:45 AM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #51 on: February 08, 2017, 01:08:26 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Jacksonville had even less attendance than Tampa--14,491 vs. 18,751. I see a problem with them playing too many shows in the same geographic area--Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami. Miami nearly sold out, but the former two barely sold at all. Makes you wonder if they would have just played Tampa or Jacksonville if they would've come close to selling out. Also, playing St. Louis looks to have been a mistake (only half sold). Another mistake: doing Minn, Pontiac and Toronto. All three aren't terribly far apart and they would have been better off doing Pontiac and Toronto as the stats suggest. If you take those four shows out, most shows on that leg were close to or above 3/4 full.

You can see a similar effect on the first NA leg of that tour. Kansas City and Pittsburgh were between 43% and 61% full. KC was a mistake to play and I'm wondering why they made that mistake twice (doing KC the first time and then trying again with St. Louis less than 6 months later). Also booking Pitt, Philly, Columbus, DC and NJ back to back to back. Those aren't very far apart and it's no wonder they didn't sell them out. Keep in mind, too, that tickets were crazy expensive and they were bringing these huge stadium shows with expensive tickets to some cities with lackluster economies.

I don't know who planned this tour and its venues/tour dates, but whoever did massively screwed up. They are lucky they even sold as many tickets as they did considering the locations, close proximity of dates, prices etc.

To put it into perspective, it'd be like if they took TJT redux tour to 30+ US cities (20 on one leg, another 10 on the next leg) over the course of 6 months and charged $90+ per ticket, minimum. They would have a hard time selling most or even half of those out; heck, even a couple dates on this tour are no where close to being sold out.

A better way of doing things would have been to either cut tickets or play smaller venues like arenas.

Offline il_capo

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #52 on: February 08, 2017, 01:31:36 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #53 on: February 08, 2017, 02:46:20 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

Pretty sure it was 28.50 for Wembley and Roundhay Park.....about 50 in todays money...

So relatively speaking cheaper than what they are charging today.

Offline il_capo

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #54 on: February 08, 2017, 03:16:17 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

Pretty sure it was 28.50 for Wembley and Roundhay Park.....about 50 in todays money...

So relatively speaking cheaper than what they are charging today.

I think once fees were added in it came to about 35 a ticket.  At the time that seemed really expensive, much more than we had paid for any previous U2 tour.   From the perspective of paying 80 for TJT30 tour it seems reasonable but Popmart was just 10 years after the original TJT when we were paying 10-14 to see U2.

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #55 on: February 08, 2017, 03:19:47 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

Pretty sure it was 28.50 for Wembley and Roundhay Park.....about 50 in todays money...

So relatively speaking cheaper than what they are charging today.

I think once fees were added in it came to about 35 a ticket.  At the time that seemed really expensive, much more than we had paid for any previous U2 tour.   From the perspective of paying 80 for TJT30 tour it seems reasonable but Popmart was just 10 years after the original TJT when we were paying 10-14 to see U2.

10-14? If prices were like that on this TJT tour, I'd be going to every show on the tour.  ;D

Offline imaginary friend

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #56 on: February 08, 2017, 03:37:10 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Jacksonville had even less attendance than Tampa--14,491 vs. 18,751. I see a problem with them playing too many shows in the same geographic area--Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami. Miami nearly sold out, but the former two barely sold at all. Makes you wonder if they would have just played Tampa or Jacksonville if they would've come close to selling out. Also, playing St. Louis looks to have been a mistake (only half sold). Another mistake: doing Minn, Pontiac and Toronto. All three aren't terribly far apart and they would have been better off doing Pontiac and Toronto as the stats suggest. If you take those four shows out, most shows on that leg were close to or above 3/4 full.

You can see a similar effect on the first NA leg of that tour. Kansas City and Pittsburgh were between 43% and 61% full. KC was a mistake to play and I'm wondering why they made that mistake twice (doing KC the first time and then trying again with St. Louis less than 6 months later). Also booking Pitt, Philly, Columbus, DC and NJ back to back to back. Those aren't very far apart and it's no wonder they didn't sell them out. Keep in mind, too, that tickets were crazy expensive and they were bringing these huge stadium shows with expensive tickets to some cities with lackluster economies.

I don't know who planned this tour and its venues/tour dates, but whoever did massively screwed up. They are lucky they even sold as many tickets as they did considering the locations, close proximity of dates, prices etc.

To put it into perspective, it'd be like if they took TJT redux tour to 30+ US cities (20 on one leg, another 10 on the next leg) over the course of 6 months and charged $90+ per ticket, minimum. They would have a hard time selling most or even half of those out; heck, even a couple dates on this tour are no where close to being sold out.

A better way of doing things would have been to either cut tickets or play smaller venues like arenas.

Minneapolis and Pontiac are very far apart if you're not going by air. Seriously, you can drive from Pontiac to ST. Louis, MO in less time.

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #57 on: February 08, 2017, 03:59:40 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

Pretty sure it was 28.50 for Wembley and Roundhay Park.....about 50 in todays money...

So relatively speaking cheaper than what they are charging today.

I think once fees were added in it came to about 35 a ticket.  At the time that seemed really expensive, much more than we had paid for any previous U2 tour.   From the perspective of paying 80 for TJT30 tour it seems reasonable but Popmart was just 10 years after the original TJT when we were paying 10-14 to see U2.

Don't recall any fees....just bought them over the counter.

Zooropa I have just checked was 22.50

A 6 rise in 4 years.

Haven't they just gone up by over 20 in less than 2...?

All prices for standing.

Offline il_capo

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #58 on: February 08, 2017, 04:19:56 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Popmart was a highly successful tour in Europe and, I think, the rest of the world outside certain parts of North America.  I wonder if they returned to safer sounds on ATYCLB because they wanted to re-capture their place in America as a whole, or perhaps because age was catching up on them and it would not have seemed very convincing trying to make hip dance music when they were entering their 40s.  My impression is that they were, and remain, very proud of the album.  I think they toured it exclusively in arenas as they wanted to reconnect with their audience and rebuild their confidence after the non-sold-out Popmart American stadium shows. 

I still think that the $52.50 + fees price point in the US for PopMart really hurt it. That was very expensive for the time, and they didn't have a sponsor to keep prices down. The prices didn't have too much of an effect in the large cities because the pool of people interested made up for it, but in cities like Pittsburgh, college areas, fly-over country, etc., it was a lot of money back then for casual fans to fork out. Zoo TV tix were a lot cheaper. I was in college at the time, and ordering 4 tickets for myself and friends was kind of pricey. A friend of mine bought a ticket, upper level of Three Rivers Stadium, with crap sound for the same price that we got our floor level seats.

Good point - I don't know about America but ticket prices in the UK were high for Popmart, and it was the first tour where I only went to a single show due to the high cost of the tickets.  $52.50 + fees sounds alot for a 1990s show, indeed.  And their fanbase was much younger and less affluent in the 1990s.

Pretty sure it was 28.50 for Wembley and Roundhay Park.....about 50 in todays money...

So relatively speaking cheaper than what they are charging today.

I think once fees were added in it came to about 35 a ticket.  At the time that seemed really expensive, much more than we had paid for any previous U2 tour.   From the perspective of paying 80 for TJT30 tour it seems reasonable but Popmart was just 10 years after the original TJT when we were paying 10-14 to see U2.

10-14? If prices were like that on this TJT tour, I'd be going to every show on the tour.  ;D

Tickets were $5 for the Sun Devil Stadium shows which were filmed for R&H.  As I said on another thread - if they want to celebrate TJT they should bring back the same ticket pricing for the tour  :P

As regards Popmart, this is what wiki says: "Tickets... were priced at an average of $50 worldwide. Due to the lack of sponsors for the tour, ticket prices were almost 50% higher for this tour than Zoo TV."

I am pretty certain that it cost more than 28.50 in the UK.  I recall the Wembley box office charged a booking fee with every ticket purchased.  Not sure what the situation was at the Leeds show as I didn't go to that one.

Offline riffraff

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #59 on: February 09, 2017, 04:54:35 AM »
I would still, honestly, like to know why it costs almost $300 for a "decent" seat in a stinking stadium for the upcoming tour. This is outrageous, in my opinion.
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