Author Topic: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?  (Read 2121 times)

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Offline Starman

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2017, 06:40:48 AM »
I think another issue is that, by that time, most casual people who had wanted to see U2 live already had done so. Pop didn't have much of a selling point for the casual fan, so why shell out over $50 to see the band touring an album that no one cared about?

I'm know there were a lot of people who didn't see PopMart but saw Elevation, which was a more in demand tour.

Offline dougie

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2017, 11:19:09 AM »
In 1978, Winterland arena in San Francisco was closing down. The Grateful Dead and The Blues Brothers were playing New Years Eve for the final show. Talk about hard tix to get!

They had lotteries at all the ticket outlets (Wearhouse records and other retailers)- each were given an allotment. Well, I had everyone I know go and get lottery tix. Well, my dad's ticket won! Yup, even had my mom and dad go to downtown Santa Cruz for the lottery. My dad was so cool about it.

And talk about lucky. They had mail order lottery for the first Bridge School Benefit in the middle 80's. Bruce Springsteen during his 'Born in the USA' tour, Crosby Stills Nash and Young, The Eagles and more. Everybody sent in mail orders- my dad won again. My sister, my brother and his wife and myself went. A real family outing!

Offline achtungx

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2017, 01:15:49 PM »
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I think another issue is that, by that time, most casual people who had wanted to see U2 live already had done so. Pop didn't have much of a selling point for the casual fan, so why shell out over $50 to see the band touring an album that no one cared about?

I'm know there were a lot of people who didn't see PopMart but saw Elevation, which was a more in demand tour.
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I think another issue is that, by that time, most casual people who had wanted to see U2 live already had done so. Pop didn't have much of a selling point for the casual fan, so why shell out over $50 to see the band touring an album that no one cared about?

I'm know there were a lot of people who didn't see PopMart but saw Elevation, which was a more in demand tour.

$52.50 in fees back in 1997 is approximately $78.51 + fees in 2016 dollars. That was a hell of a lot of money for the casual fan back then. In 1994/95 Pearl Jam went after Ticketmaster on fees because they "wanted to keep their tickets priced at $20 each." TWENTY DOLLARS!

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2017, 06:32:10 PM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Jacksonville had even less attendance than Tampa--14,491 vs. 18,751. I see a problem with them playing too many shows in the same geographic area--Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami. Miami nearly sold out, but the former two barely sold at all. Makes you wonder if they would have just played Tampa or Jacksonville if they would've come close to selling out. Also, playing St. Louis looks to have been a mistake (only half sold). Another mistake: doing Minn, Pontiac and Toronto. All three aren't terribly far apart and they would have been better off doing Pontiac and Toronto as the stats suggest. If you take those four shows out, most shows on that leg were close to or above 3/4 full.

You can see a similar effect on the first NA leg of that tour. Kansas City and Pittsburgh were between 43% and 61% full. KC was a mistake to play and I'm wondering why they made that mistake twice (doing KC the first time and then trying again with St. Louis less than 6 months later). Also booking Pitt, Philly, Columbus, DC and NJ back to back to back. Those aren't very far apart and it's no wonder they didn't sell them out. Keep in mind, too, that tickets were crazy expensive and they were bringing these huge stadium shows with expensive tickets to some cities with lackluster economies.

I don't know who planned this tour and its venues/tour dates, but whoever did massively screwed up. They are lucky they even sold as many tickets as they did considering the locations, close proximity of dates, prices etc.

To put it into perspective, it'd be like if they took TJT redux tour to 30+ US cities (20 on one leg, another 10 on the next leg) over the course of 6 months and charged $90+ per ticket, minimum. They would have a hard time selling most or even half of those out; heck, even a couple dates on this tour are no where close to being sold out.

A better way of doing things would have been to either cut tickets or play smaller venues like arenas.

Minneapolis and Pontiac are very far apart if you're not going by air. Seriously, you can drive from Pontiac to ST. Louis, MO in less time.

I misspoke on that one and forgot to include Madison, WI. They played Madison 4 months before Minneapolis and sold only 34,000/40,000 tickets. Madison is around 4 hours from Minn and likely drew a lot of the crowd that Minn would. That should have indicated to them that playing Minn was a bad idea.

Regarding Pontiac/Toronto/Minn, it's likely those three concerts had a lot of people from outside of their respective states attending. The issue with this--as we've seen with Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Chicago on TJT redux tour--is that those three aren't major enough cities to draw most/all their crowd in from the area. Lots of people are traveling from states surrounding those. The result on this tour has been that two of the shows quickly sold out while one is struggling to sell. The result on Popmart was two shows at near full capacity while one sold 28,000/52,000 tickets--barely half full.

If you're going to play smaller areas like that, you're best to skip one of those shows than risk a half full capacity show.

Offline Starman

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #64 on: February 12, 2017, 11:05:42 AM »
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For y'all who wonder why U2 isn't keen on revisiting Pop ... and for those lamenting ticket sales for 2017 ... have a look at the stats from PopMart, particularly the third leg in North America. Tampa is the show where Edge said 'Everyone, feel free to spread out!' Absolutely SHOCKING.

Though I do question the stats on the Georgia Dome. I was at that show, and that dome holds like 70,000 people -- not including the floor -- and while they didn't sell behind the stage, I feel like there were way more people there that the stats suggest. I didn't see 4,000 empty seats, I'll tell you that.

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Jacksonville had even less attendance than Tampa--14,491 vs. 18,751. I see a problem with them playing too many shows in the same geographic area--Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami. Miami nearly sold out, but the former two barely sold at all. Makes you wonder if they would have just played Tampa or Jacksonville if they would've come close to selling out. Also, playing St. Louis looks to have been a mistake (only half sold). Another mistake: doing Minn, Pontiac and Toronto. All three aren't terribly far apart and they would have been better off doing Pontiac and Toronto as the stats suggest. If you take those four shows out, most shows on that leg were close to or above 3/4 full.

You can see a similar effect on the first NA leg of that tour. Kansas City and Pittsburgh were between 43% and 61% full. KC was a mistake to play and I'm wondering why they made that mistake twice (doing KC the first time and then trying again with St. Louis less than 6 months later). Also booking Pitt, Philly, Columbus, DC and NJ back to back to back. Those aren't very far apart and it's no wonder they didn't sell them out. Keep in mind, too, that tickets were crazy expensive and they were bringing these huge stadium shows with expensive tickets to some cities with lackluster economies.

I don't know who planned this tour and its venues/tour dates, but whoever did massively screwed up. They are lucky they even sold as many tickets as they did considering the locations, close proximity of dates, prices etc.

To put it into perspective, it'd be like if they took TJT redux tour to 30+ US cities (20 on one leg, another 10 on the next leg) over the course of 6 months and charged $90+ per ticket, minimum. They would have a hard time selling most or even half of those out; heck, even a couple dates on this tour are no where close to being sold out.

A better way of doing things would have been to either cut tickets or play smaller venues like arenas.

Minneapolis and Pontiac are very far apart if you're not going by air. Seriously, you can drive from Pontiac to ST. Louis, MO in less time.

I misspoke on that one and forgot to include Madison, WI. They played Madison 4 months before Minneapolis and sold only 34,000/40,000 tickets. Madison is around 4 hours from Minn and likely drew a lot of the crowd that Minn would. That should have indicated to them that playing Minn was a bad idea.

Regarding Pontiac/Toronto/Minn, it's likely those three concerts had a lot of people from outside of their respective states attending. The issue with this--as we've seen with Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Chicago on TJT redux tour--is that those three aren't major enough cities to draw most/all their crowd in from the area. Lots of people are traveling from states surrounding those. The result on this tour has been that two of the shows quickly sold out while one is struggling to sell. The result on Popmart was two shows at near full capacity while one sold 28,000/52,000 tickets--barely half full.

If you're going to play smaller areas like that, you're best to skip one of those shows than risk a half full capacity show.

Two things:

1. This tour still is different from PopMart in that there is demand. Even if Pittsburgh still has a lot of tickets left, it has sold more seats than PopMart did in Pittsburgh. The fact that it's a weeknight show also doesn't help.

2. Are you saying that Chicago isn't a major city? That couldn't be further from the truth.

Offline Saint1322

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #65 on: February 13, 2017, 09:15:53 AM »
The fact of the matter is, yes, PopMart sold far better in Europe and South America than it did in North America. But, overall, the sales for this tour were disappointing and embarrassing. While we can sit here and carve up the globe and say 'Well, this was more about North America than it was the rest of the world' it is highly doubtful U2 see it that way. U2 up to this point, and really again after, had always OWNED America. It wast their home away from home, and the U.S. embraced U2 in a way it never embraced its own. Just four years after PopMart, what band was called upon to mourn 9/11 at the Super Bowl, the biggest single-day event in the U.S.? U2. There could have been no other choice.

So my point is, yes, they did in fact group too many shows together. There was no reason to try to play three shows in Florida, one in Tennessee, one in Georgia, one in North Carolina and one in South Carolina. And one in NOLA. That was too ambitious. However, you couldn't have combined the attendance in three of those shows and sold one out.

I am just saying that people need to keep these stats in mind when talking about U2 'ignoring' Pop. Whether a few very vocal fans love the album and tour or not, the rest of the world didn't, and it makes zero sense to ask U2 to revisit this period at the expense of the huge successes that went before and would come after.

Offline jonnydeaf

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #66 on: February 15, 2017, 04:59:24 PM »
Standing in line felt like effort, which for a well-loved band felt fair, a good relationship takes some effort.

I remember queing outside the Carrier Dome, which produces some blustery winds around the building, waiting for a wristband. The wristbands were worn for a few days, and meant that I got to come back another time to wait in the bluster for the announcement of the first number. I never had a really high number, but I was never shut out of a show I wanted.

My favorite old ticket experience was for a one-off Pearl Jam show in Boston at the Orpheum in '94. The tickets went on sale at 4 pm. I called in and on my first dial - rotary phone, no less, I got through. The tickets arrived in the mail and I knew they were ok, row PP or something. Little did I know that the Orpheum's rows started at OO. Somehow I scored a second row seat to a legendary Pearl Jam show that they later released as a live album.
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I've had some good fortune with concerts, and am anxiously awaiting the TJT show this summer. Buying tickets on-line lacks the romance that standing in line did, though I do love being able to select seats at the end of an aisle. I do miss putting in the effort though.

Offline Canadanne

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #67 on: February 15, 2017, 06:06:58 PM »
Did anyone else ever have to rely on a parent to buy tickets while you were at school? And then get home in the afternoon to find that the parent had been unsuccessful? That was my first experience of U2 ticket sales. :P

Offline il_capo

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #68 on: February 15, 2017, 06:23:05 PM »
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Did anyone else ever have to rely on a parent to buy tickets while you were at school? And then get home in the afternoon to find that the parent had been unsuccessful? That was my first experience of U2 ticket sales. :P

Are you still estranged from said parent?  ;)

Offline JonD

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #69 on: February 15, 2017, 08:16:04 PM »
Zoo TV Montreal- woke up early and started dealing repeatedly to get through to ticket master. Amazingly I scored 4 floor seats (near bstage) for me and my friends. I think it was one of my first purchases from my first credit card obtained in first year university!

Ah good memories.

Offline Canadanne

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #70 on: February 17, 2017, 11:21:56 AM »
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Did anyone else ever have to rely on a parent to buy tickets while you were at school? And then get home in the afternoon to find that the parent had been unsuccessful? That was my first experience of U2 ticket sales. :P

Are you still estranged from said parent?  ;)

Legend has it that on foggy days, my "WHAT?!" can still be heard echoing through the valleys of England.

Offline JTNash

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #71 on: February 17, 2017, 04:46:27 PM »
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Did anyone else ever have to rely on a parent to buy tickets while you were at school? And then get home in the afternoon to find that the parent had been unsuccessful? That was my first experience of U2 ticket sales. :P

Are you still estranged from said parent?  ;)

Legend has it that on foggy days, my "WHAT?!" can still be heard echoing through the valleys of England.
I totally remember kids using the pay phone at our high school to try to get tickets.

Offline cmaxwell

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Re: How Did You Buy Tickets In The Old Days?
« Reply #72 on: March 06, 2017, 03:40:13 PM »
Zoo TV indoor '92 stayed home from class and called ticketmaster ALL day until I finally got through. They were obstructed view BUT....met Bono before the show and my ticket had his autograph on it as I entered the venue to my very first U2 show!! Tacoma, WA '92   ;D ;D