Author Topic: Tedder working with Steve  (Read 5174 times)

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Offline Smee

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #30 on: March 18, 2017, 10:01:45 AM »
I have a general rule of thumb i like u2 to stick too. Dont let anyone whos own music blows, anywhere near u2 music. Based on that, im not overly happy about ryan tedders involvement

Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2017, 11:29:48 AM »
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Are they really this desperate? Last week my 6 yr daughter was watching a kids awards show and one of the awards was for best musical act. One Republic was one of the nominees. Now this awards show was aimed squarely at kids between 5 - 10 yrs old. This is the guy U2 are going to for advice and to produce them? Are they this outta touch? What happened to the Bono who once said "f**k the pop kids".

As bad as OneRepublic can be, trust me, there are FAR worse acts out there. Pop radio today is such that bands like OneRepublic and Twenty One Pilots are actually considered GOOD bands. Up til the last album of theirs, I'd happily listen to a OneRepublic song above any of the other dredge on the radio. Also, lots of bands are nominated for kids awards, even Coldplay in their heyday. Doesn't cheapen the music, it's just another award show like the Grammy's.

Tedder has worked with artists like Adele, Beyonce, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood, and Taylor Swift. We might not like any of those artists, but they are considered some of the best artists in music today. In the case of those first 3, justifiably so because they are good singers.

This is not like U2 working with, say, Justin Bieber or heck, even Ed Sheeran (who, while being talented, I don't think deserves to work with U2 just yet). They're working with a guy who has a crazy amount of experience and respect in the industry. Again, I am not a fan of his but as a amateur musician, I get why he's respected and why certain artists are HUGE today. That's why I'm not panicking about him working with U2. It could end up being good. He did a decent enough job with SoI, which makes me optimistic that he and Lillywhite can do an even better job on SoE.
As So Cruel already said, U2 are a rock band! Why should we care that OneRepublic is considered a good band? Why can't U2 work with a member of an undeniably great band? This all screams cheap to me. Nothing about this comes across as genuine. U2 are taking the easy-route in total desperation.

And why should it matter that Tedder has experience? U2 have been a band for over 40 years! Has Tedder even been alive that long?!

Offline trevgreg

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #32 on: March 18, 2017, 11:42:52 AM »
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As bad as OneRepublic can be, trust me, there are FAR worse acts out there. Pop radio today is such that bands like OneRepublic and Twenty One Pilots are actually considered GOOD bands. Up til the last album of theirs, I'd happily listen to a OneRepublic song above any of the other dredge on the radio. Also, lots of bands are nominated for kids awards, even Coldplay in their heyday. Doesn't cheapen the music, it's just another award show like the Grammy's.

Tedder has worked with artists like Adele, Beyonce, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood, and Taylor Swift. We might not like any of those artists, but they are considered some of the best artists in music today. In the case of those first 3, justifiably so because they are good singers.

This is not like U2 working with, say, Justin Bieber or heck, even Ed Sheeran (who, while being talented, I don't think deserves to work with U2 just yet). They're working with a guy who has a crazy amount of experience and respect in the industry. Again, I am not a fan of his but as a amateur musician, I get why he's respected and why certain artists are HUGE today. That's why I'm not panicking about him working with U2. It could end up being good. He did a decent enough job with SoI, which makes me optimistic that he and Lillywhite can do an even better job on SoE.

This makes some sense to me. If they were chasing truly Top 40 relevance or something "with the kids", we would've heard the Black Eyed Peas and Timbaland collaborations by now.

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wish they would have the mentality they had at the 3:40 mark

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Is this the go-to quote nowadays whenever we don't like the producer? Truth be told, Mysterious Ways wasn't exactly screaming Passengers-or-Cedars of Lebanon ambiance either... but that's not a song with pop leanings at all, right? Neither was WOWY, I guess. Or Desire. Or One...

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As So Cruel already said, U2 are a rock band! Why should we care that OneRepublic is considered a good band? Why can't U2 work with a member of an undeniably great band? This all screams cheap to me. Nothing about this comes across as genuine. U2 are taking the easy-route in total desperation.

Because no one on here will ever agree to what a truly "great" band is. When Danger Mouse was announced as being a producer here, there were also a few skeptics who asked if his style would ever come close to fitting U2's. Then when they heard Sleep Like a Baby Tonight, he all of a sudden had cred and his supposed early versions of SOI songs reached "early NLOTH tracks" mythic levels.

Then if U2 was truly a "rock" band, people on here would be saying the songs suck because they're trying to redo Vertigo or Elevation Part 2, or whatever guitar-based song doesn't sound "experimental" at the moment. On top of that, I'm not even sure if Tedder's style is actually that far removed from this band's. Both acts rely on the IVviIV chords for a lot of their songs, both have had various pop-rock leanings in general in their past works, etc. But all in all, it's impossible for him to make everyone happy in a fan base if some of them are expecting the band to only record their version of In Rainbows each time they don't take too long on an album or work with so-and-so, but yeah.

If he were the only one making decisions on this album, I could see some of the concern on the fit. But again, it seems like there's going to be a few producers here, so it'll more or less be what it was on the past few albums anyway. 

Offline bass slap

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #33 on: March 18, 2017, 12:29:38 PM »
I'd agree with the last comment. But then, my hopes for anything amazing are gone, regardless of who produces, I truly believe it will byte mediocre.

Offline pdk

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #34 on: March 18, 2017, 02:17:56 PM »
They are semi-retired.

Long gone are the days where they spent months dedicated to making music.  They obviously do not feel they have anything to prove or strive for as a "rock band".

Making albums is something they do once in a while between enjoying their golden years. It is no wonder they call in people like Tedder.  They have to maximize there their occasional studio time into creating some type of releasable product.

I was thinking about the generations of fans I encounter here.  I thought about my high school years and U2's fans back then were not pop fans. U2 back then were a challenging rock band taking chances and finding their feet through fearless experimentation.  So some of us are disappointed.  It's not U2's fault... It's our fault for expecting something from something that really no longer exists.

The later fans came in through a whole different era and ambition of U2.  U2 post 1999 were selling easily palatable and culturally compatible music. (A few detours on NLOTH but being retired the lack of commitment shows)

If we have been watching U2, it is not remotely strange for them to be working with Tedder and Epsworth.  It's logical.  Good for some of us...wretched for others... but odd?  Not if you have a propensity for math.

Offline MattD

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #35 on: March 18, 2017, 03:45:19 PM »
U2 should be following the routes of pop stars like Bjork (who worked with many of the same producers that U2 did in the 1990s) rather than cheap tacky bubblegum disposal teeny bopper nonsense. The likes of Radiohead and Bjork show that you can create massively successful and great albums just by being, you know, good.

Many of U2's ex-peers still create great works of art, that are musically expansive and artistically rewarding. I have to say 'ex' peers because they've still got self-respect not to resort to such tawdry levels like U2 are doing at the minute.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 03:55:25 PM by MattD »

Offline mikepd

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #36 on: March 18, 2017, 04:18:25 PM »
i was hoping that with Danger Mouse we would get a production akin to the Black Keys  whose albums have all (imo) been great and loud/raw (ish) but clearly they took what DM did and got others to over-polish again   I really was hoping a a loud & raw 'here we are again' album but suspect we aint going to get that e.g Best Thing still quoted as a track to be included and that 'leak' was awful

Offline The Slow Loris

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #37 on: March 18, 2017, 04:33:05 PM »
Where are Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois when you need them!? Please come back. Please. Why do I have this sinking feeling they are done with U2 (opposed to the other way around)?

Offline bass slap

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #38 on: March 18, 2017, 04:53:20 PM »
I too would prefer the eno and lanois tag team. But... would it make that much difference?

You would probably end up with a bunch of sonically interesting experimental song intro's followed by some middle of the road slightly boring songs (see NLOTH).

People putting too much emphasis on producer selection cannot see the wood from the trees in my opinion.

Offline MattD

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #39 on: March 18, 2017, 04:53:47 PM »
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Where are Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois when you need them!? Please come back. Please. Why do I have this sinking feeling they are done with U2 (opposed to the other way around)?

I wouldn't be surprised. I think Eno & Lanois were pretty fed up towards the end of No Line On The Horizon.

Lanois said 'this album was finished 6 months ago' when they were drafting in the likes of Lillywhite and Will.I.Am to wreck havoc on the middle part of the album.

Eno also lamented the fact that some of the final versions that ended up on the album were diminished of all their influences - Eno talked up the Breathe demo and said it was far more ethereal and interesting than the final 'stadium rawk' version. In fact, Eno says the demo version of Breathe is one of his favourite ever U2 songs. Ah well, guess we'll never hear it.  :'(

While there's a decent tune in there, it SEEMS they once again did what they did with the new mixes of Discotheque and Gone; they stripped it away of all it's characteristics and left in place dull chug rock.

It's difficult to work that way when your influences are trampled upon in a desperate bid to appeal to the mainstream (which ended up doing them no favours).

I wouldn't be surprised if Eno & Lanois felt it was a futile effort working with the band at this stage. As we are now witnessing, Ryan Tedder is the sorry and farcical culmination in all of these shoddy cheap tricks to remain mainstream.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 04:59:02 PM by MattD »

Offline bass slap

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #40 on: March 18, 2017, 05:00:11 PM »
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U2 should be following the routes of pop stars like Bjork (who worked with many of the same producers that U2 did in the 1990s) rather than cheap tacky bubblegum disposal teeny bopper nonsense. The likes of Radiohead and Bjork show that you can create massively successful and great albums just by being, you know, good.

Many of U2's ex-peers still create great works of art, that are musically expansive and artistically rewarding. I have to say 'ex' peers because they've still got self-respect not to resort to such tawdry levels like U2 are doing at the minute.

Would love to know who the ex-peers are still making masterpieces.

If you can come up with 2 I will eat my pants.

Band like depeche mode, simple minds they're all shadows of their former selves. In fact the latter work with reasonable producers, and still come up with good sonic textures, but the songs are generally weak and don't live up to glories. It's just how it is. Artists typically peak in their late 20's and  early 30's.

Offline bass slap

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2017, 05:03:56 PM »
Correction to my above post, I was referring to DM not SM where I talk about being sonically interesting.
And as music is measured in a subjective way, there is no chance I'll be eating my pants.

Offline MattD

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2017, 05:24:03 PM »
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U2 should be following the routes of pop stars like Bjork (who worked with many of the same producers that U2 did in the 1990s) rather than cheap tacky bubblegum disposal teeny bopper nonsense. The likes of Radiohead and Bjork show that you can create massively successful and great albums just by being, you know, good.

Many of U2's ex-peers still create great works of art, that are musically expansive and artistically rewarding. I have to say 'ex' peers because they've still got self-respect not to resort to such tawdry levels like U2 are doing at the minute.

Would love to know who the ex-peers are still making masterpieces.

If you can come up with 2 I will eat my pants.

Band like depeche mode, simple minds they're all shadows of their former selves. In fact the latter work with reasonable producers, and still come up with good sonic textures, but the songs are generally weak and don't live up to glories. It's just how it is. Artists typically peak in their late 20's and  early 30's.

Depeche Mode's new album is better than anything U2 have released in years. Bjork's album from 2015 was great - a contemporary of that electro scene in the 90s. Radiohead's album last year was brilliant and they're approaching their fifties. I'm not expecting them to peak, but to at least rival these fellow great artists.

The fact is they haven't come close, and I wouldn't expect them to if they continue working with cheap producers like Tedder.

Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2017, 07:00:31 PM »
Either choose one talented producer (Flood, Danger Mouse, Butch Vig...) and create a mature and sonically interesting record a la Zooropa, or drop all of that fancy sh** and make a true, full-fledged rock album... something the band hasn't done since Achtung Baby. But even that is debatable.

I'm not saying this is what they must do, I want U2 to make songs that they enjoy making... and I don't believe that it's pop music. Talented musicians don't just start sucking for no reason, but a 180 shift in musical direction can do that. Look at Coldplay, for example.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 07:02:44 PM by WookieeWarrior10 »

Offline TheFlyMacphisto

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Re: Tedder working with Steve
« Reply #44 on: March 18, 2017, 07:03:33 PM »
While I agree with everything said here that they haven't made a great (or even really good) album in years, I believe that the last few albums have had absolute gold on them.

Moment of Surrender, Magnificent,  Every Breaking Wave, The Troubles, Mercy (release that damn song on an album!) and a few others are among the best material they have EVER written, so the talent and mojo is still there if they wish to call up the muse.

Just my two cents.