Author Topic: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees  (Read 32201 times)

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Offline The Exile

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #510 on: August 28, 2017, 06:11:18 PM »
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Does the band's recent "mysterious" publicity about Blackout/The Blackout qualify as "different" or "experimental" for them?

I'd say the mailers are different for U2 (although mysterious snail-mail is exactly how Radiohead promoted their most recent album). I for one am stoked that we may have new music within the week.

they did?

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Offline THRILLHO

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #511 on: August 28, 2017, 09:33:18 PM »
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Does the band's recent "mysterious" publicity about Blackout/The Blackout qualify as "different" or "experimental" for them?

I'd say the mailers are different for U2 (although mysterious snail-mail is exactly how Radiohead promoted their most recent album). I for one am stoked that we may have new music within the week.

they did?

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i love the promo campaign for the AMAZING OKC box set. very retro. that and sending letters out.

well good on U2 for being different this time.

Offline shineinthesummernight

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #512 on: August 29, 2017, 05:53:20 PM »
Sounds energetic and fun!

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #513 on: August 30, 2017, 12:03:07 PM »
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I've listened to The Blackout twice and it's already stuck in my head, though not necessarily in a good way.  Too many "when the lights go out," I think.

It's certainly a big, loud song, and it does get you moving.  I THINK it might be a well-made song, but it also seems a bit of a mess of pieces that don't quite flow.  I don't know.  Songs eventually come together in one's mind after repeated listens, but I don't see myself listening to The Blackout repeatedly, mostly BECAUSE of its big loudness. 

More tied in with some of the ideas of this discussion chain, though, I guess I can conclude that I'm an Eno/Lanois production ambience fan.

The Blackout has the feel of any number of bands big and small, and of a particular type there were a lot of in Los Angeles when I lived there years ago, and probably still are: slick studio feel, loud, lots of attitude, dudes in the band are good-looking, but not much SOUL.

Anyway, I feel pretty much the same about The Blackout as I did Joey Ramone after first listens...except the chorus of Joey Ramone didn't get stuck in my head.  When will these "when the lights go out" in my mind go away?

I'm middle aged and need some ambience in my home listening music.  "I need some sugar in my bowl..."  Nina Simone

I only like a couple Elbow songs, but found myself listening to this live version of Starlings endlessly last night.  So good!
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Maybe I wish U2 would make more "mature" music? 

I've only listened once, and had mostly a positive impression, but I'll agree with you regarding "ambiance".  I feel like they really embraced ambiance in their music from 1984 through the end of the 90's or so.  Since then, I feel like they've sort of idolized their early "punk" period and really skewed that direction since then.  It's fine every once in awhile, but I feel like maybe they could steer back to some of the ambient textures they used in arguably their most successful and creative period.

Offline NOLA Fly

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #514 on: August 30, 2017, 12:29:56 PM »
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I've listened to The Blackout twice and it's already stuck in my head, though not necessarily in a good way.  Too many "when the lights go out," I think.

It's certainly a big, loud song, and it does get you moving.  I THINK it might be a well-made song, but it also seems a bit of a mess of pieces that don't quite flow.  I don't know.  Songs eventually come together in one's mind after repeated listens, but I don't see myself listening to The Blackout repeatedly, mostly BECAUSE of its big loudness. 

More tied in with some of the ideas of this discussion chain, though, I guess I can conclude that I'm an Eno/Lanois production ambience fan.

The Blackout has the feel of any number of bands big and small, and of a particular type there were a lot of in Los Angeles when I lived there years ago, and probably still are: slick studio feel, loud, lots of attitude, dudes in the band are good-looking, but not much SOUL.

Anyway, I feel pretty much the same about The Blackout as I did Joey Ramone after first listens...except the chorus of Joey Ramone didn't get stuck in my head.  When will these "when the lights go out" in my mind go away?

I'm middle aged and need some ambience in my home listening music.  "I need some sugar in my bowl..."  Nina Simone

I only like a couple Elbow songs, but found myself listening to this live version of Starlings endlessly last night.  So good!
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Maybe I wish U2 would make more "mature" music? 

I've only listened once, and had mostly a positive impression, but I'll agree with you regarding "ambiance".  I feel like they really embraced ambiance in their music from 1984 through the end of the 90's or so.  Since then, I feel like they've sort of idolized their early "punk" period and really skewed that direction since then.  It's fine every once in awhile, but I feel like maybe they could steer back to some of the ambient textures they used in arguably their most successful and creative period.

Yeah.  They seem to want to "rawk" when they're much better at roll.

Miracle Drug isn't a favorite song, but I like listening to it because of its ambience, you know?  That widescreen technicolor sweep... 

I just listened to it again.  It's certainly a rocker.  Seems like the strongest part of the song are Adam and the lyrics (except for Fred, Ned, Jack, and Zack, which are sure to get the Unknown Caller treatment on the forum).





I don't know, it seems to me to tie in with the "Go easy on me, brother." in the pre-chorus.

Offline lucas.homem

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #515 on: August 30, 2017, 01:32:37 PM »
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I've listened to The Blackout twice and it's already stuck in my head, though not necessarily in a good way.  Too many "when the lights go out," I think.

It's certainly a big, loud song, and it does get you moving.  I THINK it might be a well-made song, but it also seems a bit of a mess of pieces that don't quite flow.  I don't know.  Songs eventually come together in one's mind after repeated listens, but I don't see myself listening to The Blackout repeatedly, mostly BECAUSE of its big loudness. 

More tied in with some of the ideas of this discussion chain, though, I guess I can conclude that I'm an Eno/Lanois production ambience fan.

The Blackout has the feel of any number of bands big and small, and of a particular type there were a lot of in Los Angeles when I lived there years ago, and probably still are: slick studio feel, loud, lots of attitude, dudes in the band are good-looking, but not much SOUL.

Anyway, I feel pretty much the same about The Blackout as I did Joey Ramone after first listens...except the chorus of Joey Ramone didn't get stuck in my head.  When will these "when the lights go out" in my mind go away?

I'm middle aged and need some ambience in my home listening music.  "I need some sugar in my bowl..."  Nina Simone

I only like a couple Elbow songs, but found myself listening to this live version of Starlings endlessly last night.  So good!
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Maybe I wish U2 would make more "mature" music? 

I've only listened once, and had mostly a positive impression, but I'll agree with you regarding "ambiance".  I feel like they really embraced ambiance in their music from 1984 through the end of the 90's or so.  Since then, I feel like they've sort of idolized their early "punk" period and really skewed that direction since then.  It's fine every once in awhile, but I feel like maybe they could steer back to some of the ambient textures they used in arguably their most successful and creative period.

Yeah.  They seem to want to "rawk" when they're much better at roll.

Miracle Drug isn't a favorite song, but I like listening to it because of its ambience, you know?  That widescreen technicolor sweep... 

I just listened to it again.  It's certainly a rocker.  Seems like the strongest part of the song are Adam and the lyrics (except for Fred, Ned, Jack, and Zack, which are sure to get the Unknown Caller treatment on the forum).





I don't know, it seems to me to tie in with the "Go easy on me, brother." in the pre-chorus.

Not sure what you mean.  Sounds like the names were thrown in just for the sake of rhyming with words in other lines.

Are you saying Fred, Ned, Jack, and Zack are brothers?   8)

I think the names are there to "mimic" conversations, to show that those thoughts are coming from the people, not only from the writer of the song.

Offline NOLA Fly

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #516 on: August 30, 2017, 02:06:40 PM »
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I've listened to The Blackout twice and it's already stuck in my head, though not necessarily in a good way.  Too many "when the lights go out," I think.

It's certainly a big, loud song, and it does get you moving.  I THINK it might be a well-made song, but it also seems a bit of a mess of pieces that don't quite flow.  I don't know.  Songs eventually come together in one's mind after repeated listens, but I don't see myself listening to The Blackout repeatedly, mostly BECAUSE of its big loudness. 

More tied in with some of the ideas of this discussion chain, though, I guess I can conclude that I'm an Eno/Lanois production ambience fan.

The Blackout has the feel of any number of bands big and small, and of a particular type there were a lot of in Los Angeles when I lived there years ago, and probably still are: slick studio feel, loud, lots of attitude, dudes in the band are good-looking, but not much SOUL.

Anyway, I feel pretty much the same about The Blackout as I did Joey Ramone after first listens...except the chorus of Joey Ramone didn't get stuck in my head.  When will these "when the lights go out" in my mind go away?

I'm middle aged and need some ambience in my home listening music.  "I need some sugar in my bowl..."  Nina Simone

I only like a couple Elbow songs, but found myself listening to this live version of Starlings endlessly last night.  So good!
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Maybe I wish U2 would make more "mature" music? 

I've only listened once, and had mostly a positive impression, but I'll agree with you regarding "ambiance".  I feel like they really embraced ambiance in their music from 1984 through the end of the 90's or so.  Since then, I feel like they've sort of idolized their early "punk" period and really skewed that direction since then.  It's fine every once in awhile, but I feel like maybe they could steer back to some of the ambient textures they used in arguably their most successful and creative period.

Yeah.  They seem to want to "rawk" when they're much better at roll.

Miracle Drug isn't a favorite song, but I like listening to it because of its ambience, you know?  That widescreen technicolor sweep... 

I just listened to it again.  It's certainly a rocker.  Seems like the strongest part of the song are Adam and the lyrics (except for Fred, Ned, Jack, and Zack, which are sure to get the Unknown Caller treatment on the forum).





I don't know, it seems to me to tie in with the "Go easy on me, brother." in the pre-chorus.

Not sure what you mean.  Sounds like the names were thrown in just for the sake of rhyming with words in other lines.

Are you saying Fred, Ned, Jack, and Zack are brothers?   8)

Rhyming was part of their function, for sure. I'm saying "brothers" in the "brotherhood of man" sense. Like lucas.homem said above, they could also be pointing to the narrators interactions with others--friends, neighbors, guy on the next pub stool, etc.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2017, 02:18:36 PM by NOLA Fly »

Offline Blueyedboy

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #517 on: August 30, 2017, 02:47:49 PM »
Adam is on fire man!

Offline miami

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #518 on: August 30, 2017, 03:04:28 PM »
I was thinking for a moment that the names were referring to previous American presidents, illustrating how trump is a pale comparison to previous presidents. However, my theory quickly floundered after discovering only jack and Zach held presidential office, unless Fred and ned were nicknames of other presidents.

I'm sure the names have some sort of significance. Or maybe not.

Offline shineinthesummernight

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #519 on: August 30, 2017, 06:59:37 PM »
The rhythm section on "The Blackout" kicks a##.  Great confidence and swagger!

Offline hollywoodswag

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #520 on: September 06, 2017, 09:18:40 AM »
I want to pull a quote out of that article. It's where Bono says that the problem with rock is that it's trying to be cool. I feel like the same could be said of SOI and now The Blackout and You're the Best Thing About Me. They both sound like a band's attempt at relevance in modern music, and I feel like it's to their detriment. It's almost as if they got spooked by the relatively lackluster reception to NLOTH, even though I don't think it was the experimentation on that album that hurt them as much as it was just them not having their best outing. Even so, I'd put Magnificent and Unknown Caller up amongst their greatest songs, and GOYB was no slouch either.

SOI and these early SOE songs (TLTTGYA less so than most) just seem like U2 trying to push their way to the top of charts without asking if these are the charts worth topping. It's like the 80s. The music that was popular then aged terribly, and those artists are relegated to being nostalgia acts. I often think that we're going through another round of that. U2 has always succeeded in having their own sounds during each decade that are unique to them, and it's why I could go see TJT live and not think of it as an 80s show. Those songs don't age. These ones will.

Offline Neil Young, man!

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #521 on: September 06, 2017, 02:32:19 PM »
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I would much prefer U2 make a "weird" song that sucks than something like Elevation or Vertigo.

I agree, and think a perfect example of this is Breathe. It has a cello (FFS!), a weird time signature, bizarre spoken/shouted verses about cockatoos, a bridge that appears after the first verse and then never recurs, etc.

Personally, I dislike the song (so much that I eventually removed it from my NLOTH playlist altogether), but I am happy that U2 made it. I'd rather my favorite band push their boundaries and create music that their fans love (even if I don't in some cases) than watch them sound like a domesticated version of Keane or Coldplay.
Agree with this and many prior comments to the same effect. I would prefer that U2s legacy is "they did some weird s-t at the end" rather than "despite finally trying desperately to fit into the new music scene, they never had another hit".

Offline MEMORY_MAN

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #522 on: September 07, 2017, 11:09:04 AM »
Great article.  I think the essence of joy they are trying to convey may not be sitting well with some folks, and that is the exact aim it seems they are going for.

Offline timeisatrain

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #523 on: September 07, 2017, 12:39:37 PM »
U2 show all signs of being a band surrounded by yes-men.

Offline The Exile

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Re: U2, Please: Get Up Off Your Knees
« Reply #524 on: September 08, 2017, 01:14:32 AM »
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I would much prefer U2 make a "weird" song that sucks than something like Elevation or Vertigo.

I agree, and think a perfect example of this is Breathe. It has a cello (FFS!), a weird time signature, bizarre spoken/shouted verses about cockatoos, a bridge that appears after the first verse and then never recurs, etc.

Personally, I dislike the song (so much that I eventually removed it from my NLOTH playlist altogether), but I am happy that U2 made it. I'd rather my favorite band push their boundaries and create music that their fans love (even if I don't in some cases) than watch them sound like a domesticated version of Keane or Coldplay.
Agree with this and many prior comments to the same effect. I would prefer that U2s legacy is "they did some weird s-t at the end" rather than "despite finally trying desperately to fit into the new music scene, they never had another hit".

Yes, I'd prefer experimentation with results I don't like than U2 By Numbers.

Now some are arguing that TBT is experimental. Maybe, I'm not sure. But I am sure that I don't like it, mainly because I find most radio pop to be vacuous and banal.