Author Topic: Find ticketdrops?  (Read 1026 times)

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Offline Mr. Sarajevo 20

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2017, 10:27:12 AM »
I got GA in 2005 for Chicago, day of show, while I was in Midway airport, had just landed.
 Had flown in for shows 3 and 4, but acquired a GA from Ticketmaster day of the 2nd show.

Happens for most U2 shows.

Offline Gavin82

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2017, 10:56:47 AM »
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My m8s got Dublin tixs from 2nd market paid 30 over FV they happy with that
Do you know where?
[/quote

Yeah Viagogo i know its NOT the right way to get tixs as such cos all the public are doing is fueling the 2nd sites even more anyway they got Block 307 for 195 Im sure Dublin will get  a GA drop but i do thinkit may have had a little drop at least by now like all others

TM has London #1 back on now Block M7 yeah i know its 187 each BUT we are paying it Londons going to be well busy with U2 & Hyde Park having Tom P etc]

Offline an tha

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2017, 05:27:26 PM »
187 i'd rather send a message to u2 and any other band that that isn't an acceptable price and the more people who send them that message the better as it would help stop them charging such a laughable amount in the future.

There is just no way it should cost the best part of 400 before travel, food, drink etc for a couple to go and see a 2 odd hour pop concert....it is in my view disgusting.

I realise u2 aren't the worst when it comes to this as well but still.

I REALLY hope those seats remain unsold.

Offline trevgreg

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2017, 07:50:25 PM »
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I don't know if this is something that happens often in Europe, but in the US this is not true. Ticket drops can happen any time, but it almost never happens on the day of. About the only time I have seen day of ticket drops is when the band released unused comp tickets, but that's typically for smaller venues and it doesn't happen very often. I have noticed that  most ticket drops occur within 2 weeks of the show, but unfortunately I have never seen this happen with U2 and I have been seeing them regularly since 1987. ~edit~ It doesn't mean it has never happened, but I have never heard of it happening nor do I know anyone who got tickets that way.

A few weeks ago, I saw Green Day and kept an eye on Ticketmaster throughout the afternoon of the show for ticket drops. I already had decent lower level seats, but was interested in seeing what might come up. They did a ticket drop around 2 p.m. for some very good lower level tickets, which I saw get snapped up right away and put right on StubHub for twice the price. Then a little before 5 p.m., 5 or 6 really good 12th row seats in the second-closest section to the stage popped up. After a few refreshes, I picked up two of them and sold the original tickets before the show and broke even. It actually wasn't much of an upgrade from what I already had, but the closer view was definitely nice!

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187 i'd rather send a message to u2 and any other band that that isn't an acceptable price and the more people who send them that message the better as it would help stop them charging such a laughable amount in the future.

There is just no way it should cost the best part of 400 before travel, food, drink etc for a couple to go and see a 2 odd hour pop concert....it is in my view disgusting.

I realise u2 aren't the worst when it comes to this as well but still.

I REALLY hope those seats remain unsold.

The only time I ever really balked at a ticket price in my life was for a Rolling Stones ticket, on the stadium field, for $425 with fees included. One seat. $425. And it wasn't even a close row or anything... like 38th or whatever it was. I laughed and thought that I'd keep an eye on StubHub for a decent seat closer to the day of the show. Then to my luck, some fourth row seats came up at half of the original price two days before the show, and I finally pulled the trigger there. Still paid less for that than what I did for a Paul McCartney ticket during his pre-sale the following year. Oddly enough, there were some decent tickets that also came down a bit closer to the day of that show on StubHub, so maybe I would've been better off waiting there too.

I do GA for most shows, so I rarely spend more than $90 for a show as it is. That's probably why I don't mind breaking the bank a bit every so often if I'm getting a decent ticket for a big act. But that's just me. Unfortunately, that's sort of the nature of the beast until things change, which they might never do.

Someone here posted an article awhile ago about a man who helped ticket bots succeed way back when, and it had an interesting part that might explain why ticket prices are so high for some acts these days (and might explain why those Stones and McCartney tickets went down in price when they wouldn't sell)...

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If there's a reliably profitable secondary market for tickets, that means tickets are being priced too inexpensively by the artist. Pricing tickets too low is an understandable decision for an artist to make, because obviously no one wants to play to an empty venue and no artist wants to be seen as greedily extracting as much money as possible from fans. When face value ticket prices increase, scalpers generally respond by sitting sales out, meaning less competition for fans during public onsales.

"There's an emotional aspect to what artists do, which is to say 'I'm not willing to charge $500 even though clearly the market value is $500. I'm going to charge $100, and at the end of the day someone else is going to make that money,'" Rich Holtzman, head of StubHub's music business development, told me. "The marketplace will always exist as long as artists won't increase their ticket prices."

Ticketmaster takes this view, as well: "What drives the secondary market and creates the motivation for scalpers to use bad acting bots is the enormity of the pricing gap between the face value and market value of a ticket," Ticketmaster's Mulkey said.

Offline Gavin82

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2017, 03:35:41 AM »
400 is nothing these days i know someone who went to Glasgow to Hydro Arena
Train from Cardiff was 130ish
Tix was 180 but she got it for 140
Hotel was 80

thats before food & drink etc it can be cheaper to fly to another EU country too see them
« Last Edit: April 22, 2017, 03:38:27 AM by Gavin82 »

Offline an tha

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2017, 04:38:22 AM »
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I don't know if this is something that happens often in Europe, but in the US this is not true. Ticket drops can happen any time, but it almost never happens on the day of. About the only time I have seen day of ticket drops is when the band released unused comp tickets, but that's typically for smaller venues and it doesn't happen very often. I have noticed that  most ticket drops occur within 2 weeks of the show, but unfortunately I have never seen this happen with U2 and I have been seeing them regularly since 1987. ~edit~ It doesn't mean it has never happened, but I have never heard of it happening nor do I know anyone who got tickets that way.

A few weeks ago, I saw Green Day and kept an eye on Ticketmaster throughout the afternoon of the show for ticket drops. I already had decent lower level seats, but was interested in seeing what might come up. They did a ticket drop around 2 p.m. for some very good lower level tickets, which I saw get snapped up right away and put right on StubHub for twice the price. Then a little before 5 p.m., 5 or 6 really good 12th row seats in the second-closest section to the stage popped up. After a few refreshes, I picked up two of them and sold the original tickets before the show and broke even. It actually wasn't much of an upgrade from what I already had, but the closer view was definitely nice!

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
187 i'd rather send a message to u2 and any other band that that isn't an acceptable price and the more people who send them that message the better as it would help stop them charging such a laughable amount in the future.

There is just no way it should cost the best part of 400 before travel, food, drink etc for a couple to go and see a 2 odd hour pop concert....it is in my view disgusting.

I realise u2 aren't the worst when it comes to this as well but still.

I REALLY hope those seats remain unsold.

The only time I ever really balked at a ticket price in my life was for a Rolling Stones ticket, on the stadium field, for $425 with fees included. One seat. $425. And it wasn't even a close row or anything... like 38th or whatever it was. I laughed and thought that I'd keep an eye on StubHub for a decent seat closer to the day of the show. Then to my luck, some fourth row seats came up at half of the original price two days before the show, and I finally pulled the trigger there. Still paid less for that than what I did for a Paul McCartney ticket during his pre-sale the following year. Oddly enough, there were some decent tickets that also came down a bit closer to the day of that show on StubHub, so maybe I would've been better off waiting there too.

I do GA for most shows, so I rarely spend more than $90 for a show as it is. That's probably why I don't mind breaking the bank a bit every so often if I'm getting a decent ticket for a big act. But that's just me. Unfortunately, that's sort of the nature of the beast until things change, which they might never do.

Someone here posted an article awhile ago about a man who helped ticket bots succeed way back when, and it had an interesting part that might explain why ticket prices are so high for some acts these days (and might explain why those Stones and McCartney tickets went down in price when they wouldn't sell)...

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

If there's a reliably profitable secondary market for tickets, that means tickets are being priced too inexpensively by the artist. Pricing tickets too low is an understandable decision for an artist to make, because obviously no one wants to play to an empty venue and no artist wants to be seen as greedily extracting as much money as possible from fans. When face value ticket prices increase, scalpers generally respond by sitting sales out, meaning less competition for fans during public onsales.

"There's an emotional aspect to what artists do, which is to say 'I'm not willing to charge $500 even though clearly the market value is $500. I'm going to charge $100, and at the end of the day someone else is going to make that money,'" Rich Holtzman, head of StubHub's music business development, told me. "The marketplace will always exist as long as artists won't increase their ticket prices."

Ticketmaster takes this view, as well: "What drives the secondary market and creates the motivation for scalpers to use bad acting bots is the enormity of the pricing gap between the face value and market value of a ticket," Ticketmaster's Mulkey said.


Once TM et al got the green light for legalised touting it all changed.

Offline magnolia61

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Re: Find ticketdrops?
« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2017, 02:52:42 AM »
I am 'dropping' 4 x GA Berlin and am looking for 4 x GA New York 29th :-)

« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 02:55:40 AM by magnolia61 »