Author Topic: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix  (Read 1379 times)

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Offline cocamojoe

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My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« on: April 17, 2017, 04:56:27 PM »
Now that the new mix is finally here, and as I have listened to it a good half-dozen or so times, here are my thoughts:

Bono's new vocal recording sounds great, imo. My only quibble, is when he sings "in reeeed hiiiillll toooowwwn", as there is this shimmering vocal effect that I hate, replete with an echo. It sounds plastic, and I don't like it. Also, I don't get why there are horns? And, while the horn melody itself isn't bad, they sound fake, like a synthesizer, rather than actual horns.

Barring those two critiques, I quite like it, and think that current Bono sounds great alongside younger Bono's voice. If I remember right, Bono has, complainingly, referred to his voice in the verses as "sounding like a rich man singing about being poor", or something to that effect. All the same, the positive differences are, overall, so minute, that it seems rather superfluous.

Does anyone know if this is being released to radio? If so, do you think that it'll chart well?

On another U2 forum, there is a user who is so ridiculously, hilariously dramatic about his love for this song, that I will eventually wander over there, in the hopes of finding some feedback from him.



Offline codeguy

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2017, 06:28:48 PM »
It won't chart. I like it, but it's still from a 30 year old album

Offline lucas.homem

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2017, 07:38:18 PM »
Not a song that I like, but the new version is fine.

Offline monopoly

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2017, 07:43:39 PM »
I like the new guitar

Offline trevgreg

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2017, 08:18:22 PM »
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It won't chart. I like it, but it's still from a 30 year old album

I don't know if anyone was honestly expecting it to. Were they?

Offline cocamojoe

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2017, 08:36:32 PM »
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It won't chart. I like it, but it's still from a 30 year old album
I was semi under the impression that it was being released as a single, partially in the hopes of it's helping to increase interest in their upcoming tour.

I don't know if anyone was honestly expecting it to. Were they?

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2017, 09:59:16 PM »
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It won't chart. I like it, but it's still from a 30 year old album

I don't know if anyone was honestly expecting it to. Were they?

Not sure who would. This wasn't single material back in the day, it's certainly not now. Great song, just not a fit for pop radio.

Offline zoo adam

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2017, 02:02:15 AM »
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It won't chart. I like it, but it's still from a 30 year old album

I don't know if anyone was honestly expecting it to. Were they?

Not sure who would. This wasn't single material back in the day, it's certainly not now. Great song, just not a fit for pop radio.

It was slated as the second JT single & a video made. There is a thread on why it was not released.

I believe it is radio material. Not too long, high tempo & a great song for summer.

But as a video has not been made U2 are not treating it as a single. Which is a pity as a video & radio play will make it a hit, 30 years old or not. 
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 02:05:17 AM by zoo adam »

Offline an tha

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2017, 02:33:06 AM »
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Now that the new mix is finally here, and as I have listened to it a good half-dozen or so times, here are my thoughts:

Bono's new vocal recording sounds great, imo. My only quibble, is when he sings "in reeeed hiiiillll toooowwwn", as there is this shimmering vocal effect that I hate, replete with an echo. It sounds plastic, and I don't like it. Also, I don't get why there are horns? And, while the horn melody itself isn't bad, they sound fake, like a synthesizer, rather than actual horns.

Barring those two critiques, I quite like it, and think that current Bono sounds great alongside younger Bono's voice. If I remember right, Bono has, complainingly, referred to his voice in the verses as "sounding like a rich man singing about being poor", or something to that effect. All the same, the positive differences are, overall, so minute, that it seems rather superfluous.

Does anyone know if this is being released to radio? If so, do you think that it'll chart well?

On another U2 forum, there is a user who is so ridiculously, hilariously dramatic about his love for this song, that I will eventually wander over there, in the hopes of finding some feedback from him.

In answer to your question about the brass - the below is taken from an editorial from The Guardian newspaper here in The UK.


Few of Britain's coal mines are still operative but remarkably several of their bands play on. Eleven of them have come together to release an album.


Few sounds are as evocative of a place and time in British life as a colliery brass band.

By turns magnificent and melancholy, a miners' band sings even now of a way of life in which the disciplines of some of the hardest physical work ever devised by humankind coexisted with the very different disciplines of creating something beautiful and haunting not to mention the accompaniment to an old Hovis TV advert.

When Emile Zola, on the final page of his novel Germinal, writes of the countryside ringing with song as the black and avenging army of miners toils underground, the sound of brass is not hard to hear. Anyone who can remember the conflicted emotions of March 3 1985, when the defeated miners marched back to work behind their brass bands after their year-long strike, is likely to retain the rich memory that, while the pit embodied life as it actually was, the brass band sang for life as it might be.

A quarter of a century on, few of the pits now remain. Yet remarkably and appropriately several of the bands play on. Resonant names like the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, Betteshanger Brass, or Buckhaven and Methil Miners Brass Band still blow their horns, though the coalfields are long closed.

Eleven surviving bands have now come together to make an album called The Music Lives On Now the Mines Have Gone, due for release at the start of this month, on the anniversary of the end of the strike. It deserves to sell well. The music, like the memory, does not fade.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 02:35:23 AM by an tha »

Offline il_capo

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2017, 12:02:15 PM »
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Now that the new mix is finally here, and as I have listened to it a good half-dozen or so times, here are my thoughts:

Bono's new vocal recording sounds great, imo. My only quibble, is when he sings "in reeeed hiiiillll toooowwwn", as there is this shimmering vocal effect that I hate, replete with an echo. It sounds plastic, and I don't like it. Also, I don't get why there are horns? And, while the horn melody itself isn't bad, they sound fake, like a synthesizer, rather than actual horns.

Barring those two critiques, I quite like it, and think that current Bono sounds great alongside younger Bono's voice. If I remember right, Bono has, complainingly, referred to his voice in the verses as "sounding like a rich man singing about being poor", or something to that effect. All the same, the positive differences are, overall, so minute, that it seems rather superfluous.

Does anyone know if this is being released to radio? If so, do you think that it'll chart well?

On another U2 forum, there is a user who is so ridiculously, hilariously dramatic about his love for this song, that I will eventually wander over there, in the hopes of finding some feedback from him.

In answer to your question about the brass - the below is taken from an editorial from The Guardian newspaper here in The UK.


Few of Britain's coal mines are still operative but remarkably several of their bands play on. Eleven of them have come together to release an album.


Few sounds are as evocative of a place and time in British life as a colliery brass band.

By turns magnificent and melancholy, a miners' band sings even now of a way of life in which the disciplines of some of the hardest physical work ever devised by humankind coexisted with the very different disciplines of creating something beautiful and haunting not to mention the accompaniment to an old Hovis TV advert.

When Emile Zola, on the final page of his novel Germinal, writes of the countryside ringing with song as the black and avenging army of miners toils underground, the sound of brass is not hard to hear. Anyone who can remember the conflicted emotions of March 3 1985, when the defeated miners marched back to work behind their brass bands after their year-long strike, is likely to retain the rich memory that, while the pit embodied life as it actually was, the brass band sang for life as it might be.

A quarter of a century on, few of the pits now remain. Yet remarkably and appropriately several of the bands play on. Resonant names like the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, Betteshanger Brass, or Buckhaven and Methil Miners Brass Band still blow their horns, though the coalfields are long closed.

Eleven surviving bands have now come together to make an album called The Music Lives On Now the Mines Have Gone, due for release at the start of this month, on the anniversary of the end of the strike. It deserves to sell well. The music, like the memory, does not fade.

Nice summary of the importance of brass bands in colliery towns.  Dave Russell has written a good history of brass bands in northern towns for those who want to read a bit more.  I do wonder why U2 feel it is important to make the brass prominent in the song in 2017 rather than in 1987, however. 

Offline aviastar

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2017, 01:17:11 PM »
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Now that the new mix is finally here, and as I have listened to it a good half-dozen or so times, here are my thoughts:

Bono's new vocal recording sounds great, imo. My only quibble, is when he sings "in reeeed hiiiillll toooowwwn", as there is this shimmering vocal effect that I hate, replete with an echo. It sounds plastic, and I don't like it. Also, I don't get why there are horns? And, while the horn melody itself isn't bad, they sound fake, like a synthesizer, rather than actual horns.

Barring those two critiques, I quite like it, and think that current Bono sounds great alongside younger Bono's voice. If I remember right, Bono has, complainingly, referred to his voice in the verses as "sounding like a rich man singing about being poor", or something to that effect. All the same, the positive differences are, overall, so minute, that it seems rather superfluous.

Does anyone know if this is being released to radio? If so, do you think that it'll chart well?

On another U2 forum, there is a user who is so ridiculously, hilariously dramatic about his love for this song, that I will eventually wander over there, in the hopes of finding some feedback from him.

In answer to your question about the brass - the below is taken from an editorial from The Guardian newspaper here in The UK.


Few of Britain's coal mines are still operative but remarkably several of their bands play on. Eleven of them have come together to release an album.


Few sounds are as evocative of a place and time in British life as a colliery brass band.

By turns magnificent and melancholy, a miners' band sings even now of a way of life in which the disciplines of some of the hardest physical work ever devised by humankind coexisted with the very different disciplines of creating something beautiful and haunting not to mention the accompaniment to an old Hovis TV advert.

When Emile Zola, on the final page of his novel Germinal, writes of the countryside ringing with song as the black and avenging army of miners toils underground, the sound of brass is not hard to hear. Anyone who can remember the conflicted emotions of March 3 1985, when the defeated miners marched back to work behind their brass bands after their year-long strike, is likely to retain the rich memory that, while the pit embodied life as it actually was, the brass band sang for life as it might be.

A quarter of a century on, few of the pits now remain. Yet remarkably and appropriately several of the bands play on. Resonant names like the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, Betteshanger Brass, or Buckhaven and Methil Miners Brass Band still blow their horns, though the coalfields are long closed.

Eleven surviving bands have now come together to make an album called The Music Lives On Now the Mines Have Gone, due for release at the start of this month, on the anniversary of the end of the strike. It deserves to sell well. The music, like the memory, does not fade.

The brass bands are the subject of a funny (from what I remember) movie called Brassed Off...haven't seen it in years though.

Offline Bono in love with himself

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2017, 11:41:56 PM »
Scorch the Earth so tie it to the Sky...

great line.

Offline eddyjedi

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2017, 06:39:42 AM »
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Scorch the Earth so tie it to the Sky...

great line.

Set fire to the sky you mean? That's what i hear anyway.

Offline Smee

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2017, 09:24:15 AM »
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Scorch the Earth so tie it to the Sky...

great line.

Set fire to the sky you mean? That's what i hear anyway.

Thats what i always thought it was too

Offline Bono in love with himself

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Re: My thoughts on the new Red Hill Mining Town mix
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2017, 05:27:03 PM »
And we stooped so low
 To reach so high.