Author Topic: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?  (Read 979 times)

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Offline an tha

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2017, 01:12:03 PM »
The national language of Ireland is not Gaelic...it is Irish - a language only a very small number of people use as a first language.

Offline the_chief

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2017, 01:15:45 PM »
I'm Irish. I work in Dublin 5 days a week. It's begrudgery

1. The studio along the Grand Canal has thousands of goodwill messages written on the wall. You can spot the Irish people who have written because it's all about how he betrayed his country, avoided tax etc etc

2. Anyone I speak to in Dublin hates U2 because they think Bono is a "preaching c**t."
Yet, when something bad happens in the world, the same people talk about how bad it is and why people aren't doing anything about it. It's hypocritical beyond belief.

3. I know for a fact they pay taxes in this country. Each member of the band. However, I know someone who also knows this for a fact, yet he tries to argue against it to make out they don't.

That's the level you're dealing with here.
I completely understand people not liking them for their music. That's all well and good.

But, the love for U2 here hit a peak in 2001. It's been downhill since. Especially since 2005.
I remember the 3rd date in Dublin on the 360 tour. There were more people from other countries in attendance than there were Irish...Bono even noticed it. Seemed to be a bit taken a back

Offline 73October

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2017, 01:20:26 PM »
OK, I stand corrected an tha. 
I just looked on Wikipedia.  It is officially called Irish.  I just think more people speak it than is actually the case because there are Irish language schools and also a lot of public signage is bi-lingual and public bodies sometimes like to employ people who can speak both languages.

Offline an tha

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2017, 01:24:00 PM »
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OK, I stand corrected an tha. 
I just looked on Wikipedia.  It is officially called Irish.  I just think more people speak it than is actually the case because there are Irish language schools and also a lot of public signage is bi-lingual and public bodies sometimes like to employ people who can speak both languages.

Lots of people can indeed speak it because they have been taught it....but not many do speak it, not as their first language.

Similar in Wales - although it is even worse in Wales - road signs are bi-lingual and literally hardly anyone speaks Welsh regularly.

Some rural areas use it a little more.

« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 01:26:22 PM by an tha »

Offline 73October

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2017, 02:05:41 PM »
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OK, I stand corrected an tha. 
I just looked on Wikipedia.  It is officially called Irish.  I just think more people speak it than is actually the case because there are Irish language schools and also a lot of public signage is bi-lingual and public bodies sometimes like to employ people who can speak both languages.

Lots of people can indeed speak it because they have been taught it....but not many do speak it, not as their first language.

Similar in Wales - although it is even worse in Wales - road signs are bi-lingual and literally hardly anyone speaks Welsh regularly.

Some rural areas use it a little more.

I live in England (just) and work in Wales.  On an almost daily basis I have to work with Welsh road names and place names.  When someone rings up saying they live on/at xxxx, I have to ask them to repeat about 3 times so I come across as typically ignorantly English.  I work with people in rural areas and also in new housing schemes where the developer seems to be going out of their way to find the most ridiculous name for a new road with as many apostrophes, hyphens and soft double l's that you can have and as little English vowels than you need.

Offline an tha

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2017, 02:10:11 PM »
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OK, I stand corrected an tha. 
I just looked on Wikipedia.  It is officially called Irish.  I just think more people speak it than is actually the case because there are Irish language schools and also a lot of public signage is bi-lingual and public bodies sometimes like to employ people who can speak both languages.

Lots of people can indeed speak it because they have been taught it....but not many do speak it, not as their first language.

Similar in Wales - although it is even worse in Wales - road signs are bi-lingual and literally hardly anyone speaks Welsh regularly.

Some rural areas use it a little more.

I live in England (just) and work in Wales.  On an almost daily basis I have to work with Welsh road names and place names.  When someone rings up saying they live on/at xxxx, I have to ask them to repeat about 3 times so I come across as typically ignorantly English.  I work with people in rural areas and also in new housing schemes where the developer seems to be going out of their way to find the most ridiculous name for a new road with as many apostrophes, hyphens and soft double l's that you can have and as little English vowels than you need.

 :)

It is sport for them!

Offline 73October

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2017, 02:23:19 PM »
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I'm Irish. I work in Dublin 5 days a week. It's begrudgery

1. The studio along the Grand Canal has thousands of goodwill messages written on the wall. You can spot the Irish people who have written because it's all about how he betrayed his country, avoided tax etc etc

2. Anyone I speak to in Dublin hates U2 because they think Bono is a "preaching c**t."
Yet, when something bad happens in the world, the same people talk about how bad it is and why people aren't doing anything about it. It's hypocritical beyond belief.

3. I know for a fact they pay taxes in this country. Each member of the band. However, I know someone who also knows this for a fact, yet he tries to argue against it to make out they don't.

That's the level you're dealing with here.
I completely understand people not liking them for their music. That's all well and good.

But, the love for U2 here hit a peak in 2001. It's been downhill since. Especially since 2005.
I remember the 3rd date in Dublin on the 360 tour. There were more people from other countries in attendance than there were Irish...Bono even noticed it. Seemed to be a bit taken a back

Back to the thread..

I'd prefer to listen to what Bono has to say than some beardy guy with initials 'JC' who seems to be popping up at any popularist event going.  Some might say that both men may have messianic tendencies - but for different reasons. 
I'm British (and confused), but prefer what a man from the Irish Republic has to say current issues than an English republican man has to say about current issues - contrary to popular opinion (and chants to White Stripes songs) in my country.  I don't begrudge him - it's just that I don't identify per se (I don't want to get political, so will stop now)

Yes the band do pay their taxes in Ireland.  Moving part of their business to Netherlands is no different to other companies that do the same (Canon photocopiers have a branch of their business in Netherlands - for similar reasons?).  How many Irish companies lease a Canon copier, for example?

Offline ShankAsu

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2017, 02:50:57 PM »
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OK, I stand corrected an tha. 
I just looked on Wikipedia.  It is officially called Irish.  I just think more people speak it than is actually the case because there are Irish language schools and also a lot of public signage is bi-lingual and public bodies sometimes like to employ people who can speak both languages.

Lots of people can indeed speak it because they have been taught it....but not many do speak it, not as their first language.

Similar in Wales - although it is even worse in Wales - road signs are bi-lingual and literally hardly anyone speaks Welsh regularly.

Some rural areas use it a little more.

I live in England (just) and work in Wales.  On an almost daily basis I have to work with Welsh road names and place names.  When someone rings up saying they live on/at xxxx, I have to ask them to repeat about 3 times so I come across as typically ignorantly English.  I work with people in rural areas and also in new housing schemes where the developer seems to be going out of their way to find the most ridiculous name for a new road with as many apostrophes, hyphens and soft double l's that you can have and as little English vowels than you need.

 :)

It is sport for them!
same is true in Cornwall with the Cornish language although no one seems to speak it other than the random old man they wheel around for show.  I tried to pick a book up at Waterstones on how to speak Cornish and i couldn't even find one.  Seems it might as well be a dead language.

Offline DK46

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2017, 04:29:43 PM »
Well that settles it!

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Offline 73October

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Re: Where the streets have no statues: why do the Irish hate U2?
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2017, 11:29:25 AM »
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Well that settles it!

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From one of Bono and The Edge's near neighbours on the southside.  My understanding of parts of south Dublin is that there tend to be more rich people than the northside, and there's a whiff of colonialism hanging around (private schools, rugby, large grand Victorian houses etc).  That's the kind of Dublin I like - if I was Anglo-Irish, I'd fit in there.