Author Topic: Post Concert Depression  (Read 917 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline coachtmoore

  • Stranger in a Strange Land
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Post Concert Depression
« on: September 19, 2017, 11:55:39 PM »
Does anyone out there feel meloncoly, sad, or depressed after going to the the 2017 Joshua Tree concert?  Am I alone on this?  Please hear me out before you judge.

I am not a depressed person.  However, U2 and specifically The Joshua Tree album were always the soundtrack of my life.  The meaning of the songs seemed change as I go through different phases of life.  In the small rural town I live in U2 songs are like a foreign language.  If it's not top 40 or pop country music, then no one around here can hear anything else.

Now to my point.  After the concert, which was awesome, I came to a realization that I will NEVER get to hear U2 sing those songs again live. I know I can watch YouTube concert footage or listen to CDs, but it won't be the same.  It feels like the passing of an old friend or that there was turning of one of life's pages.  There is nobody I can "really" talk to who can understand how I feel.

Has anyone else experience this feeling?

You gotta cry without weeping. . . I have no tears.
Talk without speaking. . . I have no words.
Scream without raising you voice. . . Can anyone hear me?

This is the first time that I have ever posted on a forum/blog.  I rarely even post on social media



Offline JFW

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 743
  • Wondering why I still walk the earth
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2017, 03:38:51 AM »
I do not recognize a sort of depression after a concert. This tour I went to my first U2-concert (in Amsterdam), and after the concert I went on holiday to Spain and France (I didn't even get the chance to go home first).

The concert gave me a lot of energy, did think almost every day about it. Spain has a lot of Joshua Tree related landscapes, so it was like an extension to the concert. But I get what you mean: you want to relive that feeling every time, but it's not possible. it works for me to try to remember the concert in your head in as many detail as you can.

I felt a bit (kind of) depressed after the IE-tour, while I'm not a depressed person, neither. I was a fan for about 2 years and listened every day to them. I have tried to get tickets for one of the four shows at ticketmaster two times (there were two different dates the sales started), but didn't succeed. Tried to get tickets via internet (a Dutch ebay), but didn't trust it enough. Even a few hours before the fourth show in Amsterdam I was thinking about buying GA tickets, but it was a risk. At one of the shows I tried to attend they played Magnificent. When those four shows were played it was definitive: I wouldn't go to the IE-tour. After watching the concertfilm Live In Paris, it almost hurted: what a show! At that moment I decided to save my money for the next tour for Songs of Experience. TJT17 came and the continuation of IE will come. So I'm happy about that.

U2's music gives me joy, even (or especially) when their songs are hurtful: they make me feel alive. It's a weird thing! Maybe it's the expression of my feelings?

Offline Belisama

  • Global Moderator
  • Original of the Species
  • ******
  • Posts: 45,814
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2017, 04:52:38 AM »
Having had a long career of following U2 and other tours, what you are experiencing is not uncommon.  A "dip" in mood is expected and normal after psyching yourself up for the joy and euphoria of a concert or tour.

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Does anyone out there feel meloncoly, sad, or depressed after going to the the 2017 Joshua Tree concert?  Am I alone on this?  Please hear me out before you judge.

I am not a depressed person.  However, U2 and specifically The Joshua Tree album were always the soundtrack of my life.  The meaning of the songs seemed change as I go through different phases of life.  In the small rural town I live in U2 songs are like a foreign language.  If it's not top 40 or pop country music, then no one around here can hear anything else.

Now to my point.  After the concert, which was awesome, I came to a realization that I will NEVER get to hear U2 sing those songs again live. I know I can watch YouTube concert footage or listen to CDs, but it won't be the same.  It feels like the passing of an old friend or that there was turning of one of life's pages.  There is nobody I can "really" talk to who can understand how I feel.

Has anyone else experience this feeling?

You gotta cry without weeping. . . I have no tears.
Talk without speaking. . . I have no words.
Scream without raising you voice. . . Can anyone hear me?

This is the first time that I have ever posted on a forum/blog.  I rarely even post on social media

Offline riffraff

  • Deep In the Heart
  • ****
  • Posts: 26,068
  • I know that this is not goodbye, my forum friends!
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2017, 05:16:52 AM »
Yeah, I don't know whether to laugh or cry...3 hours sleep. It was wonderful...

Offline trevgreg

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,202
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2017, 08:45:56 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Having had a long career of following U2 and other tours, what you are experiencing is not uncommon.  A "dip" in mood is expected and normal after psyching yourself up for the joy and euphoria of a concert or tour.

This.

Offline Smee

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 920
  • Im Eddie and im a Monkey
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2017, 09:00:27 AM »
Id say your just experiencing the comedown...after being so hyped, climaxing with the gig. I usually feel this way after having a great time. Its like a "back to reality" thing.

Offline codeguy

  • Elevated
  • ***
  • Posts: 3,792
  • If there is a light, don't let it go out
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2017, 10:45:40 AM »
I do have a feeling that the SOE album might be the last major release from the band. They have previously said that this is the last in the current iteration of U2 - IE they are internally expecting to re-invent themselves to produce anything that would come after SOE. The question was Dave Fanning asking Adam specifically in the context of whether Songs of Ascent would see the light of day. So if U2 is expecting reinvention of themselves after the conclusion of the next album/tour cycle, I would expect them to come up radically short. And at that point, having already done a two-album auto-biographical tour, and age 60+, what reasonable path is there? There are three options: Put out mediocre albums as an excuse to tour, tour for the sake of touring, or call it quits. I would hope they choose to tour for the sake of touring, just so I can see them another few times before the end, but I would anticipate that the band might choose to call it a day and focus on other pursuits.....especially if their audience consists only of 40/50 year old fans at that point.

Sad but it happens to them all.

Offline WhenIsSOE

  • Intellectual Tortoise
  • *
  • Posts: 485
  • I hope we will meet again!
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2017, 11:29:19 AM »
Are you sure they won't play any of those songs? Streets at least is probably a lock.

Offline skelter

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,197
  • Drowning is no sin
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2017, 03:42:13 AM »
I'm the opposite. I'm a depressed person but I don't feel sadness or anything in the days post-concert. Because it feels a bit like "another day in the office" from the band on this JT tour.

360 and SOI tour had more freshness and heart. I tell myself, who should I commemorate that "my KC show" was 1 week ago, when the band themselves won't? Lol

Offline riffraff

  • Deep In the Heart
  • ****
  • Posts: 26,068
  • I know that this is not goodbye, my forum friends!
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2017, 05:27:09 AM »
Well, after only two hours sleep after the show before I had to go go go all day with my dog-care business, I was still buzzing from the show. Last night I slept 8 hours, which is like 3 days  for me! I am, honestly, still "high" from the show. Incredible stuff.

Offline theocean

  • Genius of Compression
  • ****
  • Posts: 31,342
  • The songs are in your eyes
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2017, 06:41:27 PM »
I would say the best cure is to just keep on listening to the music.... ;)

Offline riffraff

  • Deep In the Heart
  • ****
  • Posts: 26,068
  • I know that this is not goodbye, my forum friends!
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2017, 05:14:38 AM »
Yup! I worked out to The Joshua Tree yesterday, and will do so again today...I CAN'T BELIEVE I SAW THIS ALBUM PERFORMED LIVE!!! No post concert depression for me! Well, maybe just a little bit when I realize that it's over...but SOE will be here soon enough, right? RIGHT!

Offline Lizard

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 603
  • Heard a song that made some sense out of the world
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2017, 12:38:15 PM »
Well, I was high for a couple weeks after the last show I saw, but then fell into a big hole....
I hope it'll be different for you.

Offline imedi

  • Child of Grace
  • **
  • Posts: 1,556
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2017, 05:31:53 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I do have a feeling that the SOE album might be the last major release from the band. They have previously said that this is the last in the current iteration of U2 - IE they are internally expecting to re-invent themselves to produce anything that would come after SOE. The question was Dave Fanning asking Adam specifically in the context of whether Songs of Ascent would see the light of day. So if U2 is expecting reinvention of themselves after the conclusion of the next album/tour cycle, I would expect them to come up radically short. And at that point, having already done a two-album auto-biographical tour, and age 60+, what reasonable path is there? There are three options: Put out mediocre albums as an excuse to tour, tour for the sake of touring, or call it quits. I would hope they choose to tour for the sake of touring, just so I can see them another few times before the end, but I would anticipate that the band might choose to call it a day and focus on other pursuits.....especially if their audience consists only of 40/50 year old fans at that point.

Sad but it happens to them all.
tend to agree which this sad to say.. the latest u2 song bombed in the charts no surprise as it was a meh song..
every dog has its day u2 done better than 99%..
when you release a song the same time as neil horan who has 10% of your talent yet he out sells you ...
 the writing is on the wall

Offline soloyan

  • Staring at the Sun
  • **
  • Posts: 1,421
  • A dangerous idea that almost makes sense
Re: Post Concert Depression
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2017, 05:43:50 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I do have a feeling that the SOE album might be the last major release from the band. They have previously said that this is the last in the current iteration of U2 - IE they are internally expecting to re-invent themselves to produce anything that would come after SOE. The question was Dave Fanning asking Adam specifically in the context of whether Songs of Ascent would see the light of day. So if U2 is expecting reinvention of themselves after the conclusion of the next album/tour cycle, I would expect them to come up radically short. And at that point, having already done a two-album auto-biographical tour, and age 60+, what reasonable path is there? There are three options: Put out mediocre albums as an excuse to tour, tour for the sake of touring, or call it quits. I would hope they choose to tour for the sake of touring, just so I can see them another few times before the end, but I would anticipate that the band might choose to call it a day and focus on other pursuits.....especially if their audience consists only of 40/50 year old fans at that point.

Sad but it happens to them all.

I respectfully disagree. To me, another option would be to loosen up a little. Write songs and release records without second guessing. Tour when you feel like it. U2 would be a great folk band if they wanted to. Act their age. Nothing wrong with that.