Author Topic: The draw to U2 to younger fans  (Read 1580 times)

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Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2017, 07:19:51 AM »
U2 was in regular rotation in the car as a younger child. My mom primarily played ATYCLB and HTDAAB (coincidentally my two least favorite U2 albums!), which fueled my embryonic fandom at the ripe age of...  maybe seven? Possibly a tad older.

For the longest time my enjoyment of the band never extended past that, and eventually I forgot about them for a while. Then SOI dropped in 2014, which coaxed me to delve into U2's full discography. Shortly thereafter, I joined this forum after a few short months of true fandom.

Oddly enough, I'm one of the only younger fans that have grown to despise the band's newer material.

Offline julez728

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2017, 08:52:56 AM »
My best friend introduced me to their music in the early 90s just after AB was released...I was about 12 at the time.  I just remember being intrigued and I wanted to hear more.  I acquired their back catalog over time with the help of my brother.

I still enjoy their music and am glad they are still putting out new material and are having fun doing so.

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2017, 07:32:26 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2017, 08:40:15 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Offline ricebird5678

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2017, 08:51:04 PM »
I, myself, would what would be considered a 'young' fan. I am 23 years old and I can vividly remember riding in my late grandfather's pick-up truck to the store after a long day in the fields. I'd say I was 16 at the time. He was a spiritual man, and he had a burned CD, and his favorite song was "40." Thus, I was introduced to U2 thanks to David if you will.

As a few years passed on, and my awareness of the 'good music' increased, I realized how innovative U2 was and fell in love with their sounds, lyric, and passion for their profession. I will admit I would have paid an arm and a leg to be at Slane Castle or in Sydney for ZOOTV. That U2 has come and gone, but the legend lives on.

I have seen the band in concert once, at the Bonnaroo music festival this past summer. I was in a group of 40+ and I convinced a few of them to check out U2 with me. Waited for ten hours to get as close to the front as possible, and needless to say, they are hooked on the band as I am.

I think with my generation, U2 can not connect. The bubble gum music of today is so shallow that we don't tend to search for music with meaning. I just hope U2 does not continue their recent trend of trying to conform to today's norms. The Blackout is a very fresh song and a return to form in my opinion.

Offline Luzita

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2017, 08:58:10 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we dont really know. Its fascinating that, even though the dad rock thing may be a barrier, its not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Im curious did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


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Offline Smee

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2017, 07:50:38 AM »
Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Offline DoYouFeelLoved

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The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2017, 08:08:02 AM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?
For me, I do love 80's U2, but it's mostly the early days up until TUF.
I like TJT but, for some reason, I've always had a hard time relating with the aesthetics and live performances of the 87-90 period.
I don't like the way they were presenting themselves and I don't like the way the songs were being played live.
I don't think I've ever watched a full show of that era in eleven years of my fandom.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 08:09:33 AM by DoYouFeelLoved »

Offline Smee

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2017, 08:54:51 AM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?
For me, I do love 80's U2, but it's mostly the early days up until TUF.
I like TJT but, for some reason, I've always had a hard time relating with the aesthetics and live performances of the 87-90 period.
I don't like the way they were presenting themselves and I don't like the way the songs were being played live.
I don't think I've ever watched a full show of that era in eleven years of my fandom.
Im the polar opposite. I adored the live performances back then. Bonos vocal was on point (even tho he was likely wrecking his voice). Give a live performance of any tune back then, over its modern day version

Offline evaboogaard

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2017, 09:22:24 AM »
I'm 18, my dad introduced NLOTH (the album) to me when it came out, and i actually loved it. I started getting into all of their old stuff about 2 years ago, though. For me it started with ATYCLB, NLOTH and eventually SOI. I didn't even listen to the Joshua Tree, lmao.

Offline WhenIsSOE

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2017, 09:23:11 AM »
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Hold Me Thrill Me Kiss Me.

Also, Pride for some reason and the bass line in New Year's Day.
All of it.

Offline codeguy

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2017, 11:59:23 AM »
45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2017, 04:37:17 PM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.

Offline riffraff

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2017, 04:45:22 PM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?

Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2017, 04:47:27 PM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?

I could definitely jam out to some Hawkmoon in your company, Riff! Here's to hoping you draw it at your next show!