Author Topic: The draw to U2 to younger fans  (Read 1420 times)

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Offline riffraff

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2017, 04:48:26 PM »
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?

I could definitely jam out to some Hawkmoon in your company, Riff! Here's to hoping you draw it at your next show!
Thanks, dude!

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2017, 10:16:43 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


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Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.

Offline connorfin22

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2017, 10:36:23 PM »
I am 19 and I have been a fan since I heard Beautiful Day when I was about 3 years old.

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #33 on: October 10, 2017, 10:46:54 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


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Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.

Where are you from? Ive noticed there is definitely more of a draw to all ages in smaller cities they performed at. Whether the people in smaller places like KC, indianapolis, boston, etc.  there genuinely like u2 or went because it was something to do....

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #34 on: October 11, 2017, 09:11:50 PM »
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.

Where are you from? Ive noticed there is definitely more of a draw to all ages in smaller cities they performed at. Whether the people in smaller places like KC, indianapolis, boston, etc.  there genuinely like u2 or went because it was something to do....

Los Angeles.  I had many friends who were lamenting the fact they couldn't go, but a lot live around the venue where it was performed, so a lot of us hung around outside or went to the park and just tried to listen since we couldn't get tickets.  The lucky few who could told us all about it!

Offline Perico

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2017, 09:23:24 PM »
Funny story my mom told us yesterday while we were going to the show. She is a fourth grade teacher and told the kids (10 years old) she was going to see U2 tonight. The kids freak out and they say to her "tell them we love them". She is surprised by their reaction so she adds it's a rock band bla bla, and the kids say they thought she mean "youtube" and she was refering to "youtubers", which are unbelievably popular among teens here. So then she wrote the name of the band on the chalkboard to make it clear and one of them said "Oh, yeah, my mom listens to them". It made me lol.

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #36 on: October 12, 2017, 09:24:59 AM »
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Offline The Exile

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2017, 02:45:31 PM »
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.

Spacejunk69

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #38 on: October 12, 2017, 03:06:02 PM »
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.

LOL - I asked my dad for extra pocket money the week I heard NYD - and at the weekend he drove me into town to buy the album. Over the next month I bought Boy and October.

Offline tarheelmch

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #39 on: October 12, 2017, 03:14:26 PM »
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.

LOL - I asked my dad for extra pocket money the week I heard NYD - and at the weekend he drove me into town to buy the album. Over the next month I bought Boy and October.

It was the videos for New Year's Day and, mostly, Sunday Bloody Sunday at Red Rocks that did it for me. MTV played them in heavy rotation back in '84. I bought War and the VHS for Under a Blood Red Sky, and then caught up with October and Boy.

Offline Luzita

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #40 on: October 12, 2017, 03:33:31 PM »
Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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Offline WookieeWarrior10

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #41 on: October 12, 2017, 03:44:47 PM »
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Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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I think that those stories have been exhausted... there aren't too many "young" people around here.

Offline tarheelmch

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #42 on: October 12, 2017, 06:11:47 PM »
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Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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Ha! True.

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2017, 06:22:12 PM »
Found another young fan at my school today... my friend who introduced me to U2 originally and I were talking about NLOTH, and one student doing his homework nearby interrupted our conversation to excitedly ask if we were talking about U2.  The conversation was short, but long enough for me to realize that this other guy was definitely a real fan.  He had picked up on us talking about U2 from our discussing the lyrics to Crazy Tonight, acted excited when I mentioned Acrobat being played on the upcoming tour, and said that he knew every U2 album cold except Rattle and Hum.

I think U2 is being swept up by younger fans like myself, but it takes just a bit more effort to connect with an older band and an older fanbase.  But at my school, there are quite a few of us.

Offline wlomaco

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2017, 06:45:07 PM »
OK, so I'm old.  However, my 19 year old went to the Indy show with me and my husband.  He described the show as "sweet."  He also said that Muse entertained him more, but U2 put on a better performance.  I saw his Snapchat posts and they were very positive.  He plays the bass and NYD and WOWY and BD are on his regular bass-playing rotation.  He has some U2 songs on his spotify playlist.  He loved Joey Ramone (the song).  I believe he will like the new music and I believe he will go see them again.

At age 12, I took him to his first U2 show (360).  My memory is that he looked miserable.  So, much progress has been made.

I doubt he'd be a fan (which he now is) but for hearing me blasting U2 since the day he was born.  But maybe.