Author Topic: The draw to U2 to younger fans  (Read 1582 times)

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Offline trainfanjacob8

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2017, 05:10:52 PM »
I'm 19, almost 20, and I got into U2 around 2005 (I was about 7 or 8 at the time).  My dad is a huge U2 fan (since 1983 or so) and he got me interested.  I remember I used to watch the Chicago 2005 DVD all the time. I like 1980s/1990s/2000s music so that also has drawn me to the band.  I agree with others that most kids go to U2 shows because they got into U2 from their parents.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 05:13:25 PM by trainfanjacob8 »

Offline Pride

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2017, 09:40:27 PM »
I started getting into them because my dad gave me U218 when I was 3 to watch in the car on long road trips. Maybe you just need to be brought up in an environment where that genre of music is played more often?

Offline Sunchild

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #47 on: October 16, 2017, 11:08:58 AM »
I got into U2 when I was 9 in 1989, thanks to Joshua Tree. I didnt like any of their albums preceding Joshua Tree though, too unfocused for me. However I must say that when I was 10 I was very into Beatles and Rolling Stones, and Stones have been playing for 30 years at that time, and I prefered their newer music when they were older, and other kids from my school have been into Stones as well around the same age. I think if we ourselves at a very young age have been listening to older bands then there's a good chance many young kids are listening to U2 today as well, they are just not as fanatical to be on forums like this, or even having enough ability to write in the first place, or old enough to go to concerts alone, and sometimes parents dont listen to the same things to take them. That might explain to anyone why the age of music performers or any artists has no relevance for children whatsoever, and it is possible more children listen to U2 than adults, one just never finds out. Get them to listen to them, and I'm sure many if not majority will love U2 at this time.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 11:15:02 AM by Sunchild »

Offline rlabs19

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #48 on: December 02, 2017, 07:59:14 PM »
22 years old. Got into U2 around the time of SOI because I actually thought it was a cool idea to give the music as a free download on iTunes. Didn't like the album but appreciated the effort.

From there, I got interested in their music. I always knew the hits like the Big 3 from TJT, BD, Elevation, Vertigo, etc. but didn't listen to the albums. My dad recommended The Unforgettable Fire (album) and I immediately fell in love with ASOH, though it took me a bit to get into the album itself. TJT was a natural listen and I fell in love with it. Absolutely love R&H and thought the DVD was awesome.

Then I just started listening to everything I could get my hands on.

That said, I'm not in the younger generation of U2 fans that thinks HTDAAB deserved 9 Grammy's or that BD is their best song. Give me Mothers of the Disappeared any day over 3/4 of what they've written in the 21st century.

Offline Clarky

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #49 on: December 02, 2017, 08:46:27 PM »
^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 08:48:20 PM by Clarky »

Offline kinsella

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #50 on: December 02, 2017, 11:12:52 PM »
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^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.

Err....quick but obvious question here - if you got ATYCLB for Christmas in 2000 and became U2 obsessed thereafter, how the hell did it take two years for your first listen to Achtung Baby?

Offline Clarky

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #51 on: December 03, 2017, 12:16:07 AM »
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^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.

Err....quick but obvious question here - if you got ATYCLB for Christmas in 2000 and became U2 obsessed thereafter, how the hell did it take two years for your first listen to Achtung Baby?

Haha, it seems crazy now but you have to remember that I was only about 14 and I didn't have the luxury of online streaming or downloading music. I certainly wasn't the type of kid who would go out and buy CDs until I was a bit older so I just had to wait for birthdays and Christmas gifts. (MUCH more special that way though, right?) I think sometime in 2003 I had heard everything up until that point. HTDAAB was the first big anticipated release for me.

Offline SwimmingSorrows

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #52 on: December 03, 2017, 10:51:57 AM »
I'm 21, born late 1995.  My dad's a huge fan.  He grew up in Boston, and his grandparents were from Galway.  U2 played a little theater he sometimes played drums at when he was 14 or 15, and somebody snuck him in to see "this cool new band from Ireland."  He's been hooked ever since.  When ATYCLB came out, he played that record a lot in my house.  I liked Elevation when I was 5, apparently, but I didn't really get into the band until much later. 

I vaguely remember hearing the main riff of Crazy Tonight in some commercial and liking it, so I bought that song on iTunes but didn't really like the rest of it very much.  I listened to some of SOI when it was put on my iTunes and thought it was pretty good but still didn't dive into the band.  I know as well that by this point I had heard some of their bigger hits, Sunday Bloody Sunday, With or Without You, I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For.  I also remember Pride coming on in McDonalds or something and my dad saying that that song had changed his life.  I was really struck by that, but I couldn't hear the song itself well enough for it to make an impression.

What finally tipped me over the edge was this video from a YouTuber called Todd in the Shadows where he lists the "top 5 awful moments in U2's Rattle and Hum."  He essentially goes through the movie analyzing what went wrong with it and pointing out some of the more annoying parts.  He does this as a fan of U2, though, and he talks about how it led to Achtung Baby.  He also praises Bono's rant in the live version of Sunday Bloody Sunday.  This is really what got me into them.  I looked up that video and would watch it over and over.  The vocals in that version are still my favorite bits of singing Bono's ever done. 

After that, I took my dad's CD of the Joshua Tree and put it in my car.  It was a week before I stopped just replaying the first 3 songs and actually listened to the rest of it.  I listened to the rest of their material in a pretty random order.  Achtung Baby I listened to for the first time driving to visit a high school friend at his college.  I'd never heard anything from it before, not even One, so that blew me away. 

I know this is now a medium-sized novel, but I feel like I should mention that my younger brother is a fan too.  He's 11, and I write this as Songs of Experience cuts through the walls from his room to mine.  He also loved the Sunday Bloody Sunday rant early on, and I gave him a greatest hits compilation I made to start him off and a couple live albums I edited together later.  (If anyone wants the tracklists for these, just ask). 

One more point for the older fans.  A lot of people here seem to assume the younger fans must have got into U2 through their recent material, but I think that assumes that we listen to music in the same way as older generations did, which isn't really true.  We have the entire history of music at our fingertips, and that means we aren't as stuck in our time as previous generations.  Almost everyone I know loves music both new and old.  Most of us love the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac as well as new bands like twenty one pilots and Walk the Moon.  If we hear a song we like by a band and want to hear more, we can just go find their most beloved album or a greatest hits playlist in seconds.  There are so many ways to get into a band now.  I got a friend into U2 by watching It Might Get Loud, as she liked The White Stripes a lot.  There's a band called Bane's World I found because I was listening to a song on Spotify called You Say by Dori Freeman, and their song You Say I'm in Love was alphabetically next.  There is really no one way that new fans get into U2, as there are now so many ways to do it.

Offline Belisama

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #53 on: December 03, 2017, 11:53:16 AM »
^ Thank you for that post, in particular the last paragraph.  You bring up an excellent point. 

As a kid I was subject to the music my parents played on their record player.  For some reason they were really hung up on The Platters and The Ray Conniff Singers. Plus what ever they were cranking up on their super cool 8 track in the car.  Most of the music I liked as a teen came from whatever I heard on the radio. .  if you didn't like the genre of a particular station, you might miss some amazing artists.  That was just the way of it.

Now music is so much more accessible (not just in an intellectual way).  Few things give me as much pleasure as an "older" fan than to be able to discuss U2 with fans of all ages, but in particular I learn from the younger fans who are also kind enough to share their favorite artists with me. 

Offline EnduringChill

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #54 on: December 03, 2017, 01:00:50 PM »
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One more point for the older fans.  A lot of people here seem to assume the younger fans must have got into U2 through their recent material, but I think that assumes that we listen to music in the same way as older generations did, which isn't really true.  We have the entire history of music at our fingertips, and that means we aren't as stuck in our time as previous generations.  Almost everyone I know loves music both new and old.  Most of us love the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac as well as new bands like twenty one pilots and Walk the Moon.  If we hear a song we like by a band and want to hear more, we can just go find their most beloved album or a greatest hits playlist in seconds.  There are so many ways to get into a band now.  I got a friend into U2 by watching It Might Get Loud, as she liked The White Stripes a lot.  There's a band called Bane's World I found because I was listening to a song on Spotify called You Say by Dori Freeman, and their song You Say I'm in Love was alphabetically next.  There is really no one way that new fans get into U2, as there are now so many ways to do it.
I love this point you make here. Younger listeners don't need to be exposed to U2's current music to discover them- so much of their older releases are now instantly available online. I'm 21 and was introduced to U2 through my father playing The Joshua Tree on CD, but after becoming interested in them, I listened to most of their albums subsequently on YouTube, whatever songs I could find. For a while after I joined this forum, I thought that was a rarity- it seemed like most fans had bought their albums as they came out, or just bought the albums in general, rather than listening to (mostly) everything for free as I did. And it's the same with other bands, as you mentioned! If I hear a band or artist mentioned somewhere and I feel they might be worth checking out, I look their name up on YouTube and watch whatever videos they have to see what they're like. (I guess a lot of people use Spotify for this but I've never really liked using Spotify.)

Not sure what it is that appeals to me about then, or rather I'm not sure if it's any different from what older fans like about them. I like their melodies and lyrics and the personalities of the band members. I don't know if age has much to do with it.

Offline Clarky

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #55 on: December 03, 2017, 04:51:47 PM »
Great post SwimmingSorrows

Offline Allhorizonbomb

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #56 on: December 05, 2017, 10:38:07 PM »
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.

Offline Allhorizonbomb

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #57 on: December 05, 2017, 10:42:48 PM »
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.

I will also have to say I'm in the extreme minority in that my parents did not introduce U2 to me. I found them on my own on the radio one day with I'll Go Crazy If I don't Go Crazy tonight.

Offline Belisama

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #58 on: December 06, 2017, 02:52:27 AM »
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.


I am a firm believer that there is a U2 for all tastes.  Curious. . . what draws you to No Line?  I too probably like No Line more than most fans.

Offline Allhorizonbomb

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Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
« Reply #59 on: December 06, 2017, 12:27:36 PM »
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.


I am a firm believer that there is a U2 for all tastes.  Curious. . . what draws you to No Line?  I too probably like No Line more than most fans.

I love the style of the album. It it just sounds so different from everything else, but familiar. I could deal without Get on Your Boots though.