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Offline Bundang Dave

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2017, 04:19:19 PM »
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1. Zooropa
2. Pop
3. Achtung Baby
4. The Unforgettable Fire
5. The Joshua Tree
6. No Line on the Horizon
7. Songs of Innocence
8. Songs of Experience
9. How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb
10. Rattle and Hum
11. War
12. All That You Can't Leave Behind
13. Boy
14. October

A 90s man I see. I think you would say "90s U2 is best".

Yes, their 90s output is definitely my favourite, and the early 80s output my least....though I enjoy tracks from all their albums.

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2017, 10:42:03 PM »
Quite a difficult question indeed, and there are so many factors to consider -- I honestly consider all albums well put together, and I think they all fulfill what they set out to accomplish to a remarkable degree.  Here's my list:

-- TOP TIER -- INSTANT CLASSICS -- WORTH THE SPIN --
1. ACHTUNG BABY -- Every song on this album is crafted to perfection, not to mention the album itself.  This is probably the album I've listened to all the way through more than any other, because the tracklist flows and the album tells a story.  From "Zoo Station" chopping down TJT to "Love is Blindness" painting a painful picture of bittersweet irony, every track is a gem and a jaw-dropper.  No skips.
2. THE JOSHUA TREE -- Streets is the quintessential opener and probably the best crafted song I have ever heard.  JT flows remarkably well itself and creates its own mood.  Every song fits, while some can be skips depending on your mood -- A few songs took me a few listens to really get, but overall few lackluster moments.  A truly top-notch album.
3. THE UNFORGETTABLE FIRE -- "A Sort of Homecoming" would challenge Streets for the trophy of best album-opener if the album version was more like the Wide Awake in America version, in my opinion.  As it is, TUF is a majestic, ambient accomplishment: the sound of U2 proving it could remain classic and expand its sounds past the first three albums.
4. WAR -- With this album U2 truly became great, and it is worthy of its best moments.  "Sunday Bloody Sunday" is a timeless ballad; "New Year's Day" is a show-stopper from beginning to end; "Drowning Man" is poignant and absolutely breathtaking.  The album is well-crafted and only deserves the number four position on this list considering the quality of the albums above it.
5. HOW TO DISMANTLE AN ATOMIC BOMB -- I was blown away by the quality of this album the first time I heard it, and immediately thought: "Why doesn't the U2 family rave about this album?  Why?"  "Vertigo" is the perfect opener for this album, setting the scene for, in Bono's words, U2's "first rock album."  "City of Blinding Lights" is a classic: every time it can't get better, it does.  "Sometimes You Can't Make it On Your Own" is heartwrenching and beautiful.  For the number of classics on this album, it's incredible there's so much silence surrounding it.  Few skippable moments.  A true classic.
6. SONGS OF EXPERIENCE -- Needs to be given more time to see how it stands the test of time, but remarkably, most songs seem to get better as time goes on.  Again, few skippable moments.  Little Things was a jaw-dropper the first time; "Red Flag Day" as well; "Summer of Love" and "The Showman" are U2 defying their own definition again, and this constant re-creation of their image is what makes them great.  Tracklist could be better; overall, well worth the listen.

-- MIDDLE TIER -- FIRST LISTEN WORTH IT -- CLASSICS WITH SOME SKIPS --
7. ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND -- The first five on this album leave me hoping for much more, but unfortunately the second half tapers off into oblivion.  The good moments are more than that: they are great, beyond great.  Yet after the first five tracks, "In A Little While" would seem to be an interlude... yet nothing comes up afterwards.  "When I Look at the World" is an unsung gem; nothing else seems to match the level of the classics on the album.
8. RATTLE AND HUM -- Many classic moments, including "Desire," "Heartland," "Hawkmoon 269."  "All I Want is You" is an incredible journey of catharsis: proof that U2 can keep a song intimate and powerful for the length of time they do.  Overall, only a few skippable moments; the sound gets repetitive toward the end, but if you stick around for "Heartland" and "All I Want is You" it's worth the listen.
9. SONGS OF INNOCENCE -- With so many albums over so many years, U2 had to recreate itself in album trilogies.  Not once, not twice, not three or four times.. but five.  SOI could definitely be better, with many lackluster moments and more than a few "Really, Bono?"s.  But the great moments are worth those in between, and SOE doing some excavation on this one increases the appreciation factor for SOI.

-- LOWER TIER -- U2'S LOWEST -- ANYONE ELSE'S GREATEST --
10. NO LINE ON THE HORIZON -- Yes, I do like Crazy Tonight.  My first listen to this album was not a spin all the way through.  NLOTH could not keep me interested, but the few great songs it has are some of my favorites of U2.  I'm not a fan of Fez or the title track; in my opinion, they're badly crafted, with less-than-average vocals.  However, I find Boots quite catchy, "Magnificent" utterly brilliant, and Crazy never gets old.
11. BOY -- Rugged, punk, and full of promise.  "Twilight," "I Will Follow," "Anh Cat Dubh," "Electric Co." are all foretastes of the greatness U2 would someday achieve -- few moments that stand out on their own.  The lyrical brilliance is their, and the concept is incredible.  Overall a great first album.
12. OCTOBER -- I'd call the opener U2's first great song.  The fade-in sings of U2's coming glory, and then it jumps into the sound of October's punk brilliance.  I was not around when the album came out, but I'd be very excited as a young U2 fan hearing this sound.  Many wonderful moments.
13. POP -- Call me crazy, but the experimentalism of the late nineties took me many months to actually listen to.  The first song I heard off here was "Please" -- an instant turn off.  Lackluster; devoid of brilliance.  There are some great moments: "Gone" with its aching feeling of almost, or something just lost; "Staring at the Sun" could be better pulled off, but still wonderful.  The rest is not worthy of U2, in my opinion
14. ZOOROPA -- The opener is intriguing.  "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" sounds the least unfinished of any of the work here.  Hastily done; takes experimentalism too far.  The whole album, again, took me many months to actually listen too.  I only listen to it to laugh.

Offline JaraSangASongAWeapon

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2017, 01:32:54 AM »
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Quite a difficult question indeed, and there are so many factors to consider -- I honestly consider all albums well put together, and I think they all fulfill what they set out to accomplish to a remarkable degree.  Here's my list:

-- TOP TIER -- INSTANT CLASSICS -- WORTH THE SPIN --
1. ACHTUNG BABY -- Every song on this album is crafted to perfection, not to mention the album itself.  This is probably the album I've listened to all the way through more than any other, because the tracklist flows and the album tells a story.  From "Zoo Station" chopping down TJT to "Love is Blindness" painting a painful picture of bittersweet irony, every track is a gem and a jaw-dropper.  No skips.
2. THE JOSHUA TREE -- Streets is the quintessential opener and probably the best crafted song I have ever heard.  JT flows remarkably well itself and creates its own mood.  Every song fits, while some can be skips depending on your mood -- A few songs took me a few listens to really get, but overall few lackluster moments.  A truly top-notch album.
3. THE UNFORGETTABLE FIRE -- "A Sort of Homecoming" would challenge Streets for the trophy of best album-opener if the album version was more like the Wide Awake in America version, in my opinion.  As it is, TUF is a majestic, ambient accomplishment: the sound of U2 proving it could remain classic and expand its sounds past the first three albums.
4. WAR -- With this album U2 truly became great, and it is worthy of its best moments.  "Sunday Bloody Sunday" is a timeless ballad; "New Year's Day" is a show-stopper from beginning to end; "Drowning Man" is poignant and absolutely breathtaking.  The album is well-crafted and only deserves the number four position on this list considering the quality of the albums above it.
5. HOW TO DISMANTLE AN ATOMIC BOMB -- I was blown away by the quality of this album the first time I heard it, and immediately thought: "Why doesn't the U2 family rave about this album?  Why?"  "Vertigo" is the perfect opener for this album, setting the scene for, in Bono's words, U2's "first rock album."  "City of Blinding Lights" is a classic: every time it can't get better, it does.  "Sometimes You Can't Make it On Your Own" is heartwrenching and beautiful.  For the number of classics on this album, it's incredible there's so much silence surrounding it.  Few skippable moments.  A true classic.
6. SONGS OF EXPERIENCE -- Needs to be given more time to see how it stands the test of time, but remarkably, most songs seem to get better as time goes on.  Again, few skippable moments.  Little Things was a jaw-dropper the first time; "Red Flag Day" as well; "Summer of Love" and "The Showman" are U2 defying their own definition again, and this constant re-creation of their image is what makes them great.  Tracklist could be better; overall, well worth the listen.

-- MIDDLE TIER -- FIRST LISTEN WORTH IT -- CLASSICS WITH SOME SKIPS --
7. ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND -- The first five on this album leave me hoping for much more, but unfortunately the second half tapers off into oblivion.  The good moments are more than that: they are great, beyond great.  Yet after the first five tracks, "In A Little While" would seem to be an interlude... yet nothing comes up afterwards.  "When I Look at the World" is an unsung gem; nothing else seems to match the level of the classics on the album.
8. RATTLE AND HUM -- Many classic moments, including "Desire," "Heartland," "Hawkmoon 269."  "All I Want is You" is an incredible journey of catharsis: proof that U2 can keep a song intimate and powerful for the length of time they do.  Overall, only a few skippable moments; the sound gets repetitive toward the end, but if you stick around for "Heartland" and "All I Want is You" it's worth the listen.
9. SONGS OF INNOCENCE -- With so many albums over so many years, U2 had to recreate itself in album trilogies.  Not once, not twice, not three or four times.. but five.  SOI could definitely be better, with many lackluster moments and more than a few "Really, Bono?"s.  But the great moments are worth those in between, and SOE doing some excavation on this one increases the appreciation factor for SOI.

-- LOWER TIER -- U2'S LOWEST -- ANYONE ELSE'S GREATEST --
10. NO LINE ON THE HORIZON -- Yes, I do like Crazy Tonight.  My first listen to this album was not a spin all the way through.  NLOTH could not keep me interested, but the few great songs it has are some of my favorites of U2.  I'm not a fan of Fez or the title track; in my opinion, they're badly crafted, with less-than-average vocals.  However, I find Boots quite catchy, "Magnificent" utterly brilliant, and Crazy never gets old.
11. BOY -- Rugged, punk, and full of promise.  "Twilight," "I Will Follow," "Anh Cat Dubh," "Electric Co." are all foretastes of the greatness U2 would someday achieve -- few moments that stand out on their own.  The lyrical brilliance is their, and the concept is incredible.  Overall a great first album.
12. OCTOBER -- I'd call the opener U2's first great song.  The fade-in sings of U2's coming glory, and then it jumps into the sound of October's punk brilliance.  I was not around when the album came out, but I'd be very excited as a young U2 fan hearing this sound.  Many wonderful moments.
13. POP -- Call me crazy, but the experimentalism of the late nineties took me many months to actually listen to.  The first song I heard off here was "Please" -- an instant turn off.  Lackluster; devoid of brilliance.  There are some great moments: "Gone" with its aching feeling of almost, or something just lost; "Staring at the Sun" could be better pulled off, but still wonderful.  The rest is not worthy of U2, in my opinion
14. ZOOROPA -- The opener is intriguing.  "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" sounds the least unfinished of any of the work here.  Hastily done; takes experimentalism too far.  The whole album, again, took me many months to actually listen too.  I only listen to it to laugh.

Great stuff...but Sunday Bloody Sunday is not a ballad. It's a lament but a mid to fast tempo rocker on the War album.

Offline lightmyway92

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2017, 09:18:00 AM »
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Quite a difficult question indeed, and there are so many factors to consider -- I honestly consider all albums well put together, and I think they all fulfill what they set out to accomplish to a remarkable degree.  Here's my list:

-- TOP TIER -- INSTANT CLASSICS -- WORTH THE SPIN --
1. ACHTUNG BABY -- Every song on this album is crafted to perfection, not to mention the album itself.  This is probably the album I've listened to all the way through more than any other, because the tracklist flows and the album tells a story.  From "Zoo Station" chopping down TJT to "Love is Blindness" painting a painful picture of bittersweet irony, every track is a gem and a jaw-dropper.  No skips.
2. THE JOSHUA TREE -- Streets is the quintessential opener and probably the best crafted song I have ever heard.  JT flows remarkably well itself and creates its own mood.  Every song fits, while some can be skips depending on your mood -- A few songs took me a few listens to really get, but overall few lackluster moments.  A truly top-notch album.
3. THE UNFORGETTABLE FIRE -- "A Sort of Homecoming" would challenge Streets for the trophy of best album-opener if the album version was more like the Wide Awake in America version, in my opinion.  As it is, TUF is a majestic, ambient accomplishment: the sound of U2 proving it could remain classic and expand its sounds past the first three albums.
4. WAR -- With this album U2 truly became great, and it is worthy of its best moments.  "Sunday Bloody Sunday" is a timeless ballad; "New Year's Day" is a show-stopper from beginning to end; "Drowning Man" is poignant and absolutely breathtaking.  The album is well-crafted and only deserves the number four position on this list considering the quality of the albums above it.
5. HOW TO DISMANTLE AN ATOMIC BOMB -- I was blown away by the quality of this album the first time I heard it, and immediately thought: "Why doesn't the U2 family rave about this album?  Why?"  "Vertigo" is the perfect opener for this album, setting the scene for, in Bono's words, U2's "first rock album."  "City of Blinding Lights" is a classic: every time it can't get better, it does.  "Sometimes You Can't Make it On Your Own" is heartwrenching and beautiful.  For the number of classics on this album, it's incredible there's so much silence surrounding it.  Few skippable moments.  A true classic.
6. SONGS OF EXPERIENCE -- Needs to be given more time to see how it stands the test of time, but remarkably, most songs seem to get better as time goes on.  Again, few skippable moments.  Little Things was a jaw-dropper the first time; "Red Flag Day" as well; "Summer of Love" and "The Showman" are U2 defying their own definition again, and this constant re-creation of their image is what makes them great.  Tracklist could be better; overall, well worth the listen.

-- MIDDLE TIER -- FIRST LISTEN WORTH IT -- CLASSICS WITH SOME SKIPS --
7. ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND -- The first five on this album leave me hoping for much more, but unfortunately the second half tapers off into oblivion.  The good moments are more than that: they are great, beyond great.  Yet after the first five tracks, "In A Little While" would seem to be an interlude... yet nothing comes up afterwards.  "When I Look at the World" is an unsung gem; nothing else seems to match the level of the classics on the album.
8. RATTLE AND HUM -- Many classic moments, including "Desire," "Heartland," "Hawkmoon 269."  "All I Want is You" is an incredible journey of catharsis: proof that U2 can keep a song intimate and powerful for the length of time they do.  Overall, only a few skippable moments; the sound gets repetitive toward the end, but if you stick around for "Heartland" and "All I Want is You" it's worth the listen.
9. SONGS OF INNOCENCE -- With so many albums over so many years, U2 had to recreate itself in album trilogies.  Not once, not twice, not three or four times.. but five.  SOI could definitely be better, with many lackluster moments and more than a few "Really, Bono?"s.  But the great moments are worth those in between, and SOE doing some excavation on this one increases the appreciation factor for SOI.

-- LOWER TIER -- U2'S LOWEST -- ANYONE ELSE'S GREATEST --
10. NO LINE ON THE HORIZON -- Yes, I do like Crazy Tonight.  My first listen to this album was not a spin all the way through.  NLOTH could not keep me interested, but the few great songs it has are some of my favorites of U2.  I'm not a fan of Fez or the title track; in my opinion, they're badly crafted, with less-than-average vocals.  However, I find Boots quite catchy, "Magnificent" utterly brilliant, and Crazy never gets old.
11. BOY -- Rugged, punk, and full of promise.  "Twilight," "I Will Follow," "Anh Cat Dubh," "Electric Co." are all foretastes of the greatness U2 would someday achieve -- few moments that stand out on their own.  The lyrical brilliance is their, and the concept is incredible.  Overall a great first album.
12. OCTOBER -- I'd call the opener U2's first great song.  The fade-in sings of U2's coming glory, and then it jumps into the sound of October's punk brilliance.  I was not around when the album came out, but I'd be very excited as a young U2 fan hearing this sound.  Many wonderful moments.
13. POP -- Call me crazy, but the experimentalism of the late nineties took me many months to actually listen to.  The first song I heard off here was "Please" -- an instant turn off.  Lackluster; devoid of brilliance.  There are some great moments: "Gone" with its aching feeling of almost, or something just lost; "Staring at the Sun" could be better pulled off, but still wonderful.  The rest is not worthy of U2, in my opinion
14. ZOOROPA -- The opener is intriguing.  "Stay (Faraway, So Close!)" sounds the least unfinished of any of the work here.  Hastily done; takes experimentalism too far.  The whole album, again, took me many months to actually listen too.  I only listen to it to laugh.
That was probably the most enjoyable of all these lists to read.  I love the enthusiasm and lack of cynicism/negativity.  I also agree completely about "How to Dismantle..."                           

Offline hollywoodswag

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2017, 12:06:40 PM »
I'll go with my review in a similar format to Racingfan53's:

The medalists:

Gold - The Joshua Tree: In my opinion, this is the greatest album ever made. There genuinely is not a dud to be found on it. RHMT is the closest to a miss that this album has, but even it has grown on me somewhat. Streets is the ultimate rock anthem, and it just flows through one legendary song after another. Every time I play this album, I find myself appreciating at least one of its songs even more than I did the last time. I dare say it's the closest thing to a perfect album. Even if most of this album's greatest wouldn't necessarily crack my top ten, every last song is very, very good, and no other album can claim that quite as well as this one. After every great song, I know there's another one to which I can look forward (except for MOTD, because the album ends, lol).
Silver - Achtung Baby: This is at number two because while this album's best songs are arguably better than TJT's best songs, as an album, it falls ever so slightly short on consistency. That's no major problem, though, as this album brings some of the greatest rock and roll thunder ever created. Zoo Station. Even Better Than the Real Thing (a somewhat clever title, considering that its remixes make the title much more fitting). One. Until the End of the World. So Cruel. The Fly. Mysterious Ways. Tryin' to Throw Your Arms Around the World. Ultra Violet. That right there is some serious firepower. U2 really brought the goods on this one. Even when the album slumps, it's hardly dreadful, but again, when it's on its high notes, it's unmatched. If B-sides counted, this album would be gold by a country mile.
Bronze - Zooropa: That this album, a quickly-made project delivered in the middle of a tour, turned out to be so spectacular makes this album stand that much higher in my eyes. Everything about the story of this album makes it seem like it should've been little more than just a gift for the diehards, and yet it contains consistency rivaled probably only by the gold medalist on this list. However, it also packs in some of the most solid contributions to the band's catalogue. The title track and side two of the album (DGPFYCC, SDABTO, and Dirty Day especially so) are the stand-outs in my eyes, but it's a fun listen the whole way through.

Honorable Mentions:

4 - How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb: Yet another album that gets better with every listen, this album contains The Edge at his most ferocious, and some of the greatest entries to the band's catalogue came out of it. Vertigo is one of my favorite songs of all time, with COBL close behind. This one is on my list for further listening as my recent play-throughs have seen some more songs standing out to me, with SYCMIOYO and Love and Peace being two prime examples of growers. ABOY, Crumbs from Your Table, and One Step Closer round out my list of this album's hits, but the rest seem to hinder the consistency of this album a bit, which keeps it from medal contention.
5 - All That You Can't Leave Behind: This one is somewhat similar to Bomb in that it's pretty much fifty percent greatest hits and fifty percent U2 filler (I call it U2 filler because the band's filler is everyone else's best and U2 seems to put a lot of effort into every song they write). Beautiful Day (a song I can't believe I still enjoy considering the insistence radio had on beating it to death), Elevation, and Kite are a legendary trifecta, and Walk On, New York, and Peace on Earth bring the goods as well. I really enjoy the general sound of this album. The instrumental portion of it just has such an optimistic sound, almost like it's bursting forth with hope for the future. That's a perfect thing for it to do, too, seeing as it ushered in the new millennium. This is another album soon to get more listens from me.
6 - No Line on the Horizon: Consistency gives this album it's standing in my eyes. Unknown Caller is probably the only legendary song from this one in my opinion, but there are a number of other really good ones to be found (NLOTH, Magnificent, IGCIIDGCT, GOYB, and SUC). It may not have the number of heavy hitters that albums lower on my list have, but the fact that it stays interesting has left me with a high opinion of it.

Still Very Good:

7 - Pop: This album harkens back to my comments about albums like Bomb and ATYCLB being held up by heavy hitters, but the gaps between the great and the not so great really start to widen here. Last Night on Earth is top ten for me, with Gone right up in the pantheon of greats in its own right, but Discotheque, Do You Feel Loved, and The Playboy Mansion are probably the only other ones on this album worth noting.
8 - Rattle & Hum: There are a lot of gems to be found on this album. Desire, Hawkmoon 269, Angel of Harlem, God, Pt. II, and All I Want Is You are just fantastic (maybe GP2 a little less so than the others), and there are some fun live gems to be had as well. It's really just this low because the abundance of live tracks and the low number of other studio additions leave me feeling that this one doesn't bring too much in the grand scheme of things to U2's back catalogue, and I would have been happy with the studio tracks I mentioned being put together on an EP (or add the other studio tracks I wasn't as crazy about and maybe a B-side or two from one of the singles and have a different LP).
9 - The Unforgettable Fire: This one was tough to place because A Sort of Homecoming, Pride, The Unforgettable Fire, and Bad are truly incredible and better than many of the higher-ranked albums heaviest hitters, but the rest of the album is actually a pretty forgettable fire. I can forgive that, though, as it was the first foray into this type of sound that would be perfected on TUF's successor, and again, when this album is good, it's exceptional.

Good:

10 - Boy: This is one of the more fun entries into U2's discography. You can sense the desire they had to prove themselves, and we got I Will Follow, An Cat Dubh, Out of Control, and The Electric Co. out of it. I would like to listen to it some more to get more familiar with it, as there are a few songs I'm still a little fuzzy on, but I do find the album a bit rough, and that's what keeps it down here.
11 - War: A sign of things to come, but my belief that SBS and NYD are overrated (read: not bad, but not as Earth-shattering as they're generally viewed to be) and that the album never really takes off until the show-stopping closing duo of Surrender and 40 keeps this album from jumping higher on my list. It's still good as a whole, don't get me wrong, but U2 just has too many better ones.
12 - October: This one and the one right above it go a little back and forth in my eyes. Gloria and I Threw a Brick are both very good, the former especially so, and I Fall Down is my favorite track off of the band's opening trilogy and one of my all-time favorites on top of that. This is one I actually want to rank higher, but its inconsistency has kept it down here for now.

Meh:

13 - Songs of Innocence: ...aaaaaand here is where things went downhill. This album, more than any other before it, really made it seem like the band was desperate for people to like them. After twelve good to earth-shattering albums, they seem to have decided that they desperately needed approval and relevance, and it led to the most mediocre album the band had yet released. There isn't a single legendary song on this one, with EBW, SFS, TIWYCRMN, and The Troubles being the closest to really good that the album ever got. Even for those, I struggle with whether I really do like them or I'm desperate to find something resembling greatest hits on this outing. I like hwow Racingfan53 termed the lowest tier as everyone else's best, and I would agree that this album, were it put out by OneRepublic or Coldplay might have gotten me a bit more interested in them, but as a U2 album, it's just not that interesting.
14 - Songs of Experience: SOI at least had a degree of consistency to it. This one doesn't. I feel like its strongest points (especially YTBTAM, Summer of Love, and The Little Things) best those of its predecessor, but it falls HARD at points, and Bono is delivering spectacular lyrics at one point only to fall flat in the very next song. It has that same desperate need for approval feel that SOI had, but to a larger degree. It needs more listens, but my initial listens have seen it get less enjoyment from me on each respective listen instead of more.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 02:03:24 PM by hollywoodswag »

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2017, 01:27:09 PM »
JaraSangASongAWeapon -- You're right.  My bad.  Bono himself has said that he dislikes the song being misinterpreted as a call to arms.  Personally, I'm not a huge fan of SBS.  I just personally don't like listening to it, but I think it's musically very good, and I can see why many people do like it.

lighmyway92 -- Thank you!  I had a lot of fun writing my list, and HTDAAB is one of my favorites.  Although I think I've listened to AB more times, I think HTDAAB is my second most-played entire album, since I love the mood and it's just wonderful to listen to it build.  The tracklist is phenomenal.  I have a question though: It seems that I can't find a single person who likes "Yahweh," but I actually love that track.  Sure, it doesn't sound like a great amount of effort was put into it, but perhaps that's the point.  Maybe, the song being about God, it's supposed to sound more like a thought than a finished idea?

Again, it's extremely difficult to rank U2's catalogue.  If nothing else, simply because they have so much quality, that it doesn't seem fair to rank any albums lower than the top tier!  As I wrote in my list, I truly believe that many of U2's lowest points are great by most general music standards.

Offline Rasmus

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2017, 01:55:30 PM »
My top 3 and last place are very consistent but the rest can change on a daily basis:

1. Achtung Baby
2. The Joshua Tree
3. Zooropa
4. Pop
5. All That You Cant Leave Behind
6. Boy
7. The Unforgetable Fire
8. War
9. Songs of Innocence
10. Rattle & Hum
11. October
12. Songs of Experience
13. How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb
14. No Line on the Horizon

Offline lightmyway92

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2017, 03:32:55 PM »
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JaraSangASongAWeapon -- You're right.  My bad.  Bono himself has said that he dislikes the song being misinterpreted as a call to arms.  Personally, I'm not a huge fan of SBS.  I just personally don't like listening to it, but I think it's musically very good, and I can see why many people do like it.

lighmyway92 -- Thank you!  I had a lot of fun writing my list, and HTDAAB is one of my favorites.  Although I think I've listened to AB more times, I think HTDAAB is my second most-played entire album, since I love the mood and it's just wonderful to listen to it build.  The tracklist is phenomenal.  I have a question though: It seems that I can't find a single person who likes "Yahweh," but I actually love that track.  Sure, it doesn't sound like a great amount of effort was put into it, but perhaps that's the point.  Maybe, the song being about God, it's supposed to sound more like a thought than a finished idea?

Again, it's extremely difficult to rank U2's catalogue.  If nothing else, simply because they have so much quality, that it doesn't seem fair to rank any albums lower than the top tier!  As I wrote in my list, I truly believe that many of U2's lowest points are great by most general music standards.
I really like "Yahweh" a lot.  It's the joyful chorus and the Edge's mesmerizing guitar that make it great for me.  A lot of people have a problem with the lyrics, but I've always been more focused on melody, so a few questionable lines never killed a song for me like it does for a lot of people, I've noticed. Edge's riff on this song always reminded me a little of his riff on "One Tree Hill" from The Joshua Tree, one of my favorite U2 songs!  In fact, I love the sound of Edge's guitar on all the songs on this album (I also absolutely love "Miracle Drug"), the very prominent chiming guitar reminds me a lot of Boy

Another reason I love How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb so much is for sentimental reasons:  The Vertigo tour was the first time I got to see U2 in concert after being a fan ever since War.  I got into the inside of the catwalk, and I was so close I could read the brand names (Gibson, Fender, etc) on Edge's guitar!  During "I Still Haven't Found..." I was singing along when Edge noticed me, made eye contact and gave me a grin!  I could tell that he was happy to see me enjoying the song so much!  I always tell that story, so much that I'm sure people are tired of hearing it by now!
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 03:43:29 PM by lightmyway92 »

Offline BorneOfSound

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2017, 06:13:13 PM »
Always subject to change but for fun...
1. The Unforgettable Fire
2. The Joshua Tree
3. Songs Of Experience
4. Achtung Baby
5. Songs Of Innocence
6. All That You Can't Leave Behind
7. No Line On the Horizon
8. How to Dismantle An Atomic Bomb
9. Zooropa
10. War
11. Boy
12. Pop
13. Rattle and Hum
14. October


And I love October so...hard list.

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2017, 06:18:15 PM »
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JaraSangASongAWeapon -- You're right.  My bad.  Bono himself has said that he dislikes the song being misinterpreted as a call to arms.  Personally, I'm not a huge fan of SBS.  I just personally don't like listening to it, but I think it's musically very good, and I can see why many people do like it.

lighmyway92 -- Thank you!  I had a lot of fun writing my list, and HTDAAB is one of my favorites.  Although I think I've listened to AB more times, I think HTDAAB is my second most-played entire album, since I love the mood and it's just wonderful to listen to it build.  The tracklist is phenomenal.  I have a question though: It seems that I can't find a single person who likes "Yahweh," but I actually love that track.  Sure, it doesn't sound like a great amount of effort was put into it, but perhaps that's the point.  Maybe, the song being about God, it's supposed to sound more like a thought than a finished idea?

Again, it's extremely difficult to rank U2's catalogue.  If nothing else, simply because they have so much quality, that it doesn't seem fair to rank any albums lower than the top tier!  As I wrote in my list, I truly believe that many of U2's lowest points are great by most general music standards.
I really like "Yahweh" a lot.  It's the joyful chorus and the Edge's mesmerizing guitar that make it great for me.  A lot of people have a problem with the lyrics, but I've always been more focused on melody, so a few questionable lines never killed a song for me like it does for a lot of people, I've noticed. Edge's riff on this song always reminded me a little of his riff on "One Tree Hill" from The Joshua Tree, one of my favorite U2 songs!  In fact, I love the sound of Edge's guitar on all the songs on this album (I also absolutely love "Miracle Drug"), the very prominent chiming guitar reminds me a lot of Boy

Another reason I love How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb so much is for sentimental reasons:  The Vertigo tour was the first time I got to see U2 in concert after being a fan ever since War.  I got into the inside of the catwalk, and I was so close I could read the brand names (Gibson, Fender, etc) on Edge's guitar!  During "I Still Haven't Found..." I was singing along when Edge noticed me, made eye contact and gave me a grin!  I could tell that he was happy to see me enjoying the song so much!  I always tell that story, so much that I'm sure people are tired of hearing it by now!

I think you're the first person I've found on this site who's expressed a positive opinion on "Yahweh."  I'm glad to know I'm not the only one!  In fact, I heard the album a bit before I first found this site (earlier this year in the summer, since I'm a young person) and I actually remember "Yahweh" hitting me immediately.  I liked "Vertigo," COBL, "Yahweh," and "Miracle Drug" immediately.  Some of the others, especially Crumbs, took a bit to grow on me, but now I listen to the album with zero skips quite regularly.

Wow, your Vertigo tour experience sounds wonderful!  That moment with Edge is awesome.  I have yet to attend my first concert -- I'm just a teenager, but I don't know how much longer they'll be around, so hopefully I can pick up tickets to my local Experience concert or hope for another concert in the near future.

Offline JaraSangASongAWeapon

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2017, 10:00:10 PM »
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I'll go with my review in a similar format to Racingfan53's:

The medalists:

Gold - The Joshua Tree: In my opinion, this is the greatest album ever made. There genuinely is not a dud to be found on it. RHMT is the closest to a miss that this album has, but even it has grown on me somewhat. Streets is the ultimate rock anthem, and it just flows through one legendary song after another. Every time I play this album, I find myself appreciating at least one of its songs even more than I did the last time. I dare say it's the closest thing to a perfect album. Even if most of this album's greatest wouldn't necessarily crack my top ten, every last song is very, very good, and no other album can claim that quite as well as this one. After every great song, I know there's another one to which I can look forward (except for MOTD, because the album ends, lol).
Silver - Achtung Baby: This is at number two because while this album's best songs are arguably better than TJT's best songs, as an album, it falls ever so slightly short on consistency. That's no major problem, though, as this album brings some of the greatest rock and roll thunder ever created. Zoo Station. Even Better Than the Real Thing (a somewhat clever title, considering that its remixes make the title much more fitting). One. Until the End of the World. So Cruel. The Fly. Mysterious Ways. Tryin' to Throw Your Arms Around the World. Ultra Violet. That right there is some serious firepower. U2 really brought the goods on this one. Even when the album slumps, it's hardly dreadful, but again, when it's on its high notes, it's unmatched. If B-sides counted, this album would be gold by a country mile.
Bronze - Zooropa: That this album, a quickly-made project delivered in the middle of a tour, turned out to be so spectacular makes this album stand that much higher in my eyes. Everything about the story of this album makes it seem like it should've been little more than just a gift for the diehards, and yet it contains consistency rivaled probably only by the gold medalist on this list. However, it also packs in some of the most solid contributions to the band's catalogue. The title track and side two of the album (DGPFYCC, SDABTO, and Dirty Day especially so) are the stand-outs in my eyes, but it's a fun listen the whole way through.

Honorable Mentions:

4 - How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb: Yet another album that gets better with every listen, this album contains The Edge at his most ferocious, and some of the greatest entries to the band's catalogue came out of it. Vertigo is one of my favorite songs of all time, with COBL close behind. This one is on my list for further listening as my recent play-throughs have seen some more songs standing out to me, with SYCMIOYO and Love and Peace being two prime examples of growers. ABOY, Crumbs from Your Table, and One Step Closer round out my list of this album's hits, but the rest seem to hinder the consistency of this album a bit, which keeps it from medal contention.
5 - All That You Can't Leave Behind: This one is somewhat similar to Bomb in that it's pretty much fifty percent greatest hits and fifty percent U2 filler (I call it U2 filler because the band's filler is everyone else's best and U2 seems to put a lot of effort into every song they write). Beautiful Day (a song I can't believe I still enjoy considering the insistence radio had on beating it to death), Elevation, and Kite are a legendary trifecta, and Walk On, New York, and Peace on Earth bring the goods as well. I really enjoy the general sound of this album. The instrumental portion of it just has such an optimistic sound, almost like it's bursting forth with hope for the future. That's a perfect thing for it to do, too, seeing as it ushered in the new millennium. This is another album soon to get more listens from me.
6 - No Line on the Horizon: Consistency gives this album it's standing in my eyes. Unknown Caller is probably the only legendary song from this one in my opinion, but there are a number of other really good ones to be found (NLOTH, Magnificent, IGCIIDGCT, GOYB, and SUC). It may not have the number of heavy hitters that albums lower on my list have, but the fact that it stays interesting has left me with a high opinion of it.

Still Very Good:

7 - Pop: This album harkens back to my comments about albums like Bomb and ATYCLB being held up by heavy hitters, but the gaps between the great and the not so great really start to widen here. Last Night on Earth is top ten for me, with Gone right up in the pantheon of greats in its own right, but Discotheque, Do You Feel Loved, and The Playboy Mansion are probably the only other ones on this album worth noting.
8 - Rattle & Hum: There are a lot of gems to be found on this album. Desire, Hawkmoon 269, Angel of Harlem, God, Pt. II, and All I Want Is You are just fantastic (maybe GP2 a little less so than the others), and there are some fun live gems to be had as well. It's really just this low because the abundance of live tracks and the low number of other studio additions leave me feeling that this one doesn't bring too much in the grand scheme of things to U2's back catalogue, and I would have been happy with the studio tracks I mentioned being put together on an EP (or add the other studio tracks I wasn't as crazy about and maybe a B-side or two from one of the singles and have a different LP).
9 - The Unforgettable Fire: This one was tough to place because A Sort of Homecoming, Pride, The Unforgettable Fire, and Bad are truly incredible and better than many of the higher-ranked albums heaviest hitters, but the rest of the album is actually a pretty forgettable fire. I can forgive that, though, as it was the first foray into this type of sound that would be perfected on TUF's successor, and again, when this album is good, it's exceptional.

Good:

10 - Boy: This is one of the more fun entries into U2's discography. You can sense the desire they had to prove themselves, and we got I Will Follow, An Cat Dubh, Out of Control, and The Electric Co. out of it. I would like to listen to it some more to get more familiar with it, as there are a few songs I'm still a little fuzzy on, but I do find the album a bit rough, and that's what keeps it down here.
11 - War: A sign of things to come, but my belief that SBS and NYD are overrated (read: not bad, but not as Earth-shattering as they're generally viewed to be) and that the album never really takes off until the show-stopping closing duo of Surrender and 40 keeps this album from jumping higher on my list. It's still good as a whole, don't get me wrong, but U2 just has too many better ones.
12 - October: This one and the one right above it go a little back and forth in my eyes. Gloria and I Threw a Brick are both very good, the former especially so, and I Fall Down is my favorite track off of the band's opening trilogy and one of my all-time favorites on top of that. This is one I actually want to rank higher, but its inconsistency has kept it down here for now.

Meh:

13 - Songs of Innocence: ...aaaaaand here is where things went downhill. This album, more than any other before it, really made it seem like the band was desperate for people to like them. After twelve good to earth-shattering albums, they seem to have decided that they desperately needed approval and relevance, and it led to the most mediocre album the band had yet released. There isn't a single legendary song on this one, with EBW, SFS, TIWYCRMN, and The Troubles being the closest to really good that the album ever got. Even for those, I struggle with whether I really do like them or I'm desperate to find something resembling greatest hits on this outing. I like hwow Racingfan53 termed the lowest tier as everyone else's best, and I would agree that this album, were it put out by OneRepublic or Coldplay might have gotten me a bit more interested in them, but as a U2 album, it's just not that interesting.
14 - Songs of Experience: SOI at least had a degree of consistency to it. This one doesn't. I feel like its strongest points (especially YTBTAM, Summer of Love, and The Little Things) best those of its predecessor, but it falls HARD at points, and Bono is delivering spectacular lyrics at one point only to fall flat in the very next song. It has that same desperate need for approval feel that SOI had, but to a larger degree. It needs more listens, but my initial listens have seen it get less enjoyment from me on each respective listen instead of more.

Really interesting way to look at U2 albums, good stuff, but my quarrel is this: how, *how* can you rank The Unforgettable Fire at #9? After Pop? On the basis of ASOH, Bad, TUF, Wire, MLK, ISS, Promenade (and the b sides TTS and LCT), and not even considering Pride, The Unforgettable Fire belongs in the upper echelons, the top 5 of any U2 fan's list. I mean, those are legendary songs, and Bad is perhaps U2's greatest live song. The album was an epochal shift for the band considering the sound they had in the first 3 albums...Eno and Lanois. This album was also the necessary bridge to make The Joshua Tree.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 10:34:43 PM by JaraSangASongAWeapon »

Offline hollywoodswag

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2017, 05:27:22 AM »
Interestingly enough, TUF was at the front of my mind as I was writing the reviews for many of the albums above it. I kept going down the list and asking myself, "Is it time? Is it time?" I was surprising myself as I was going through and just realizing how much more I enjoyed other albums. I feel like a few shifts depending on my level of enjoyment at a particular time could see TUF moving upward a bit, but at best, I don't see it placing anywhere above the very bottom of the top fifty percent of the albums. The album as a whole, despite being anchored by four spectacular songs, just doesn't capture my attention as well as many of the band's other works.

Offline andyc2111

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2017, 11:29:26 AM »
1. Achtung Baby - bold, experimental not to mention the disharmony in the band, created the backdrop of fantastically painful and cynical lyrics with cutting music that never lets you off the hook.
2. Joshua Tree - masterpiece that really captured the late 80ís, both culturally and politically. The recent tour just showed how relevant the material still is.
3. POP - I was one of those people that just got 90ís U2. I loved the dark and personal lyrics packaged up in the Neon coating. Plus PopMart was just the most amazing thing Iíve ever seen.
4. Zooropa - So many underrated songs on this record, love the atmosphere and how sonically it switches from song to song - the run of Numb - Lemon - Stay, probably the most extreme U2 ever got.
5. The Unforgettable Fire - Dawn of a new direction for the band. Love the singles off the record, but actually itís Promenade, Wire and Elvis in America that for me are the most interesting and atmospheric pieces. Great album.
6. Boy - what a debut and still stands up today, which is the biggest compliment I could pay it.
7. Songs of Experience - No doubt for me, itís the best record theyíve done since POP, love the reflective lyrics and intensity to the album.
8. War - Drowning Man - nuff said
9. All You Cant Leave Behind - I hated this record when it came out, but have appreciated it more as itís gotten older. Solid songs throughout. Peace on Earth and Wild Honey make me sick in my mouth though.
10. Rattle and Hum - bit of a mish mash, when itís good itís great - heartland, god part II, when itís bad itís really bad - love rescue me
11. No Line on the Horizon - I actually like a lot of the songs, but for me it doesnít sound like a record, more a collection thrown together. It seems like they lost their bottle with the experimental stuff and the album suffers as a result. Iíll go crazy and stand up comedy next to fez-being born just doesnít work.
12. Songs of Innocence - The only reason this isnít bottom is down to Every Breaking Wave.
13. October - meh
14. Atomic Bomb - absolutely hate this record. Over produced and contrived musically. Lyrically ham fisted, some of Bonoís worst lines. I didnít like the tour - aside from the Zoo TV encore. This is not a rock album.

Offline EdgeUK8_my_mind

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2017, 05:23:29 PM »
Today I would rank them this way (it changes):
1) Joshua Tree
2) Achtung Baby
3) ATYCLB
4) SoE
5) TUF
6) SoI
7) HTDAAB
8) Pop
9) War
10) Rattle & Hum
11) Boy
12) NLOTH
13) Zooropa
14) October

I can find stuff I like on all these.


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Offline jjack339

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Re: Rank U2's albums
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2017, 12:31:45 AM »
Achtung Baby
The Joshua Tree
The Unforgettable Fire
War
Songs of Experience
Zooropa
October
Rattle and Hum
All That You Can't Leave Behind
Boy
Songs of Innocence
No Line On The Horizon
How To Dismantle an Atomic Bomb
Pop