Author Topic: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone  (Read 3035 times)

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Offline U2Fan

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #30 on: December 29, 2017, 10:22:32 AM »
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Nice to read him commenting a bit more on Aung San Suu Kyi. I think it's safe to say Walk On is gone from the setlists forever.

The comments on the statue of David were a bit out of nowhere and jarring. Bono seems to have a weird fixation on male circumcision. It's not the first time I've seen him mention the subject.

Walk On is a great song, and it would be a crying shame if they never play it live again.  The song is bigger than that one woman.  We're stealing it back!

Offline dwaltman

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #31 on: December 29, 2017, 01:50:40 PM »
Jann Wenner must have know that line didn't sit well.  As I was reading it, I thought immediately he will be taken to task for either the girly line or the hip-hop rage line.  Wenner could have edited it out knowing that it could lead to an unfair representation of either the interview and/or of Bono.  I wonder if there is truth in Wenner forcing SOI to be named RS's album of the year?   

Celebrity has it's price...and this is one of those times. I'd hate to be scrutinized so closely by complete strangers. I guess you learn to ignore it.

Offline ian ryan

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #32 on: December 29, 2017, 02:59:34 PM »
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Well, Summer, surprise, I'm a girl, but I just don't get all freaked out over every little comment or microaggression or whatever it's called.  Sorry, should I be more sensitive and thus tuned in to the zeitgeist?  I honestly don't think Bono meant anything demeaning by it so it's no big deal to me. 

It is called microaggression. The world tried to placate feminists but then feminists created something else to get bothered about. They keep creating new terms. What I am doing right is 'forum-violence'.

Please stay on topic. We’ve made it really, really clear that this place isn’t a personal soapbox.

Offline GPitt

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2017, 03:07:26 PM »
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I'm clearly not a feminist, as I agree with Bono and I'm a woman.  It's time for another Chrissie Hynde/Debbie Harry.  Too long since the last one.

They're out there, Jehnny Beth for example. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

These kinds of things don't get played on the radio, however, which is more to Bono's point I think. He's by and large correct, pop music (including country) is marketed toward a feminine audience/aesthetic, no doubt because that's who spends the money/streams most. Part of that is a natural balancing of voices as women are more accepted in the public sphere, and part of it is ideological and cultural. There have always been gendered music markets and artists, but just like everything it has intensified thanks to better data analytics and the subsequent honing/purification of consumerism. Hip hop IS the only pop market catering to masculinity, but was there ever more than one? Hip hop replaced rock n roll, which Bono obviously dislikes, but I am not sure there is room for more than one masculine pop category as far as the industry is concerned.

Offline durk

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2017, 03:48:03 PM »
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Nice to read him commenting a bit more on Aung San Suu Kyi. I think it's safe to say Walk On is gone from the setlists forever.

The comments on the statue of David were a bit out of nowhere and jarring. Bono seems to have a weird fixation on male circumcision. It's not the first time I've seen him mention the subject.
one of my fav U2 songs ever.
Walk On is a great song, and it would be a crying shame if they never play it live again.  The song is bigger than that one woman.  We're stealing it back!

Offline connorfin22

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #35 on: December 29, 2017, 05:29:11 PM »
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If only we could have a massive, somewhat comprehensive, discussion on this exciting RS article, but factions were made a few months ago. Shrug.

Edit: who's hammering the "girly" comments? Girls on tumblr?

Every single music website on all social medials.

Offline summerholly

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #36 on: December 29, 2017, 05:48:14 PM »
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Every single music website on all social medials.

Well who knows, if it is actually a problem and some comments would suggest that it is, maybe the somewhat heated response will bring it right into the spotlight and give people food for thought.  Maybe it will result in a shift!  Maybe Bono has inadvertently or deliberately oiled the wheels for some change!  Bono is no stranger to being hammered in the media, he does like to bring about a response! especially when it comes to facilitating change!
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 06:07:50 PM by summerholly »

Offline connorfin22

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #37 on: December 29, 2017, 07:46:29 PM »
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Every single music website on all social medials.

Well who knows, if it is actually a problem and some comments would suggest that it is, maybe the somewhat heated response will bring it right into the spotlight and give people food for thought.  Maybe it will result in a shift!  Maybe Bono has inadvertently or deliberately oiled the wheels for some change!  Bono is no stranger to being hammered in the media, he does like to bring about a response! especially when it comes to facilitating change!

That could be true, if he had worded it differently it would have got no attention.

Offline chriskellyco

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #38 on: December 29, 2017, 09:37:37 PM »
"Music has become too passive."  There.  Fixed.

Offline oktobergirl

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2017, 09:59:03 PM »
Summer of Love to me is a bad song , sonically.


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Offline DulmoU2

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2017, 11:29:13 PM »
I think you are all acting a little girly.
Absolutely overreacting about this.

Offline U2Fan

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2017, 05:37:55 AM »
I'm enjoying the die hards defending the girly comment!  ;D ;D ;D

Offline olimar

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2017, 08:32:22 AM »
Read this reported in, I think, NME and then read the interview itself later.
I can get that the mainstream media take soundbites from it, but Im surprised at its interpretation on this thread.

The use of the word "too girly" is a bad choice and has connotations, but the general point was about a lack of "rage", anger, opinion etc getting any attention or having a voice.
This is directly related to the way music is consumed now, which he mentions.
The singles (and album charts to an increasing degree) are entirely and exclusively dominated by the listening habits of its teenage audience. Of course, it was always heavily influenced in this way, but its pretty much exclusive now as the weighting has changed owing to streaming.
And songs that chart highly get more time on commercial radio and more exposure etc, as has always been the case.

Go back 10 years and someone like Radiohead could make a dent in the top 10 with a new single, but thats almost impossible now. I was surprised to discover that neither of the Gallagher brothers, despite having huge interest in the UK still, have managed a top 20 single between them in the last 3-4 years. The Stone Roses released their first new material in 18 years and it peaked at No. 17 and lasted two weeks in the charts.
The UK Singles chart top 10 is currently made up of 6 christmas songs, released years ago, but very few would have actually bought this week as an individual purchase.
If this environment existed in 2000, U2 wouldnt have had their last two No. 1 singles.

Its not to say that the music doesnt exist, or that women specifically arent making it, it was more about how it isnt being heard at all. I have a lot of time for what Ed Sheeran has achieved, but one of the criticisms of his music is that it often relates to familiar themes and with a degree of blandness. Its hard to see how anything with a voice, a political opinion, rage or whatever, is going to make a mark these days. Bono speaks in the interview about how even his son thinks hes going to start the revolution to make it heard.

The only exception to this is Hip Hop, which remains able to appeal to the right audience and gain the exposure to repeated plays, but also contains the sort of emotions, the rage, that Bono alludes to. Id imagine thats why U2 have also tried to align with the likes of Jay-Z in the past and Kendrick Lamar more recently too.

I suspect this is all something very close to Bonos heart currently, given that he has just put his soul over 3 years into personal, emotional and political stories, all that stand alone as songs rather than just as part of an album, so that they can try and appeal to the current market and its processes, only to see them fail to make the remotest impact on the charts. Thats also why they released so many different versions of Best Thing, to try and increase the number of plays racked up against one song. His frustrations might be about the music landscape in general, but its specifically being fuelled by the failures of his own band.

Maybe Im making excuses here, or Ive read it totally wrong, but I think the choice of the word "girly" was wrong, rather than the motive or point being made.

Offline olimar

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2017, 08:39:35 AM »
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"Music has become too passive."  There.  Fixed.

Actually, thats about perfect....!!

Offline olimar

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2017, 08:45:35 AM »
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So...  something interesting to me from the interview is did the Edge come up with that riff to “Summer of Love Himself?”  Because I didn’t see any “sampled by,” or “inspired by” in the album jacket.

Edge definitely didnt come up with the riff, its shown being tried out in a hotel room by Ryan Tedder (or his guitarist, I forget which).
But, given that it hasnt been recorded and therefore registered for royalties, I dont think it needs to be credited. And given that the guy who came up with it (or his band) is also producing the album, he was happy to give it up. Im sure there are countless examples of Daniel Lanois or Eno coming up with a riff and saying "hey, would this work?"