Author Topic: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone  (Read 3026 times)

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Offline summerholly

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #45 on: December 31, 2017, 09:21:35 AM »
olimar Yeah I certainly understand the point being made even if I do object to the word girly bring used.  I look back at the eighties when I was young and there was a lot of what I considered vacuous, bland music back then played by both men and women if you study the charts.  In Aus there was also a very big pub rock scene where young rock bands like Cold Chisel, Angels, Rose Tatoo, Baby Animals, AC/DC could get big followings and rocking out to these bands was what you did on Friday and Saturday nights and there were people like Molly Meldrum in the industry who had a huge influence and supported air play of these young bands.

I don't really understand streaming and Spotify and all that stuff and the current marketing of music and I certainly don't much care for what I hear on the radio.  I just assume it is what the younger crew want to listen to.  I am out of touch with teenage rage so don't know what that current landscape is either. 

Some of the alternate radio stations that I sometimes tune into when I am on the road and particularly bored and which have a big following seem full of more antsy music and also more indie music that I don't hear on more commercial radio but that I find can be intriguing but have no idea who is playing it.  Mind you I have no idea who is playing the sh**e on the commercial radios either.   

I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too.  As to U2s latest album, close to his heart and full of meaning it might be but to be completely honest it probably wouldn't have appealed to me at any stage of my life as much as I love U2.   
« Last Edit: December 31, 2017, 09:25:21 AM by summerholly »

Offline olimar

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #46 on: December 31, 2017, 10:24:20 AM »
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I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too. 

Maybe there is, but it gets drowned out more easily now.
Radiohead might have got 5,000 people to buy Paranoid Android back in the mid-90s and get it to No. 5 in the charts or whatever. But thats physical purchases and it didnt take into account how often someone played it afterwards.
What Bono is getting at is that a teenager can play a single song 200 times in a week because thats just what they do and is part of their infatuation with an artist that might pass in a year. If thats part of a streaming service, it counts as multiple purchases of the song. So, its a lot easier for a particular demographic to rack up "sales" than it might have been and it skews the charts quite a bit. Radiohead wont get anywhere near like that fanatical streaming exposure.
Same with albums, where I think once an album gets a certain number of song plays, it counts as an album sale. The fact that somebody might have only listened to the same two songs multiple times and not heard the rest of it doesnt matter. That hugely impacts the ability of certain "types" of artists to make an impact and U2 are evidently one of them.
Curiously, even though Youre The Best Thing only got to about 93 or something in the charts, its subsequent plays over time are at an impressive 15 million now. That perhaps indicates that in this new streaming world, they still can draw big numbers, but they cant draw them in a concentrated enough rush to get chart recognition in light of the above.

Offline summerholly

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #47 on: December 31, 2017, 01:09:29 PM »
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I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too. 

Maybe there is, but it gets drowned out more easily now.
Radiohead might have got 5,000 people to buy Paranoid Android back in the mid-90s and get it to No. 5 in the charts or whatever. But thats physical purchases and it didnt take into account how often someone played it afterwards.
What Bono is getting at is that a teenager can play a single song 200 times in a week because thats just what they do and is part of their infatuation with an artist that might pass in a year. If thats part of a streaming service, it counts as multiple purchases of the song. So, its a lot easier for a particular demographic to rack up "sales" than it might have been and it skews the charts quite a bit. Radiohead wont get anywhere near like that fanatical streaming exposure.
Same with albums, where I think once an album gets a certain number of song plays, it counts as an album sale. The fact that somebody might have only listened to the same two songs multiple times and not heard the rest of it doesnt matter. That hugely impacts the ability of certain "types" of artists to make an impact and U2 are evidently one of them.
Curiously, even though Youre The Best Thing only got to about 93 or something in the charts, its subsequent plays over time are at an impressive 15 million now. That perhaps indicates that in this new streaming world, they still can draw big numbers, but they cant draw them in a concentrated enough rush to get chart recognition in light of the above.

Thanks for explaining.  So the direction of commercial music is in the hands of obsessive teenagers, how fabulous.

Offline miryclay

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #48 on: December 31, 2017, 04:46:29 PM »
Here is another RS article:
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Offline PowerSurge

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #49 on: January 02, 2018, 11:55:25 AM »
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I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too. 

Maybe there is, but it gets drowned out more easily now.
Radiohead might have got 5,000 people to buy Paranoid Android back in the mid-90s and get it to No. 5 in the charts or whatever. But thats physical purchases and it didnt take into account how often someone played it afterwards.
What Bono is getting at is that a teenager can play a single song 200 times in a week because thats just what they do and is part of their infatuation with an artist that might pass in a year. If thats part of a streaming service, it counts as multiple purchases of the song. So, its a lot easier for a particular demographic to rack up "sales" than it might have been and it skews the charts quite a bit. Radiohead wont get anywhere near like that fanatical streaming exposure.
Same with albums, where I think once an album gets a certain number of song plays, it counts as an album sale. The fact that somebody might have only listened to the same two songs multiple times and not heard the rest of it doesnt matter. That hugely impacts the ability of certain "types" of artists to make an impact and U2 are evidently one of them.
Curiously, even though Youre The Best Thing only got to about 93 or something in the charts, its subsequent plays over time are at an impressive 15 million now. That perhaps indicates that in this new streaming world, they still can draw big numbers, but they cant draw them in a concentrated enough rush to get chart recognition in light of the above.

Thanks for explaining.  So the direction of commercial music is in the hands of obsessive teenagers, how fabulous.

isn't that how it has always been???

c'mon, every major band in history started as a bunch of obsessive teenagers...most bands don't start with band members in their 40's...sorry to break it to you. 

Offline summerholly

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #50 on: January 02, 2018, 07:07:24 PM »
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I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too. 

Maybe there is, but it gets drowned out more easily now.
Radiohead might have got 5,000 people to buy Paranoid Android back in the mid-90s and get it to No. 5 in the charts or whatever. But thats physical purchases and it didnt take into account how often someone played it afterwards.
What Bono is getting at is that a teenager can play a single song 200 times in a week because thats just what they do and is part of their infatuation with an artist that might pass in a year. If thats part of a streaming service, it counts as multiple purchases of the song. So, its a lot easier for a particular demographic to rack up "sales" than it might have been and it skews the charts quite a bit. Radiohead wont get anywhere near like that fanatical streaming exposure.
Same with albums, where I think once an album gets a certain number of song plays, it counts as an album sale. The fact that somebody might have only listened to the same two songs multiple times and not heard the rest of it doesnt matter. That hugely impacts the ability of certain "types" of artists to make an impact and U2 are evidently one of them.
Curiously, even though Youre The Best Thing only got to about 93 or something in the charts, its subsequent plays over time are at an impressive 15 million now. That perhaps indicates that in this new streaming world, they still can draw big numbers, but they cant draw them in a concentrated enough rush to get chart recognition in light of the above.

Thanks for explaining.  So the direction of commercial music is in the hands of obsessive teenagers, how fabulous.

isn't that how it has always been???

c'mon, every major band in history started as a bunch of obsessive teenagers...most bands don't start with band members in their 40's...sorry to break it to you.

That is very true but I was simply referring to the direction that commercial music is taking seems  linked primarily to how many times a teenager listen to and plays a track. I remember in school how everyone was completely obsessed by the Bay City Rollers and a bit earlier by David Cassidy, all my girl friends had posters of David and then they forgot David and had the Rollers plastering their bedroom walls.   At the same time the fledgling INXS and U2 were probably playing in their garages/kitchens.  Nothing to do with starting at 40 lol.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2018, 03:54:19 AM by summerholly »

Offline ian ryan

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Re: long interview with Bono in Rolling Stone
« Reply #51 on: January 02, 2018, 08:56:12 PM »
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I just cant understand why if there was a market among young people for the sort of music Bono is yearning for is it not being made by young bands, or is it just that it is not what the young market is wanting to listen too. 

Maybe there is, but it gets drowned out more easily now.
Radiohead might have got 5,000 people to buy Paranoid Android back in the mid-90s and get it to No. 5 in the charts or whatever. But thats physical purchases and it didnt take into account how often someone played it afterwards.
What Bono is getting at is that a teenager can play a single song 200 times in a week because thats just what they do and is part of their infatuation with an artist that might pass in a year. If thats part of a streaming service, it counts as multiple purchases of the song. So, its a lot easier for a particular demographic to rack up "sales" than it might have been and it skews the charts quite a bit. Radiohead wont get anywhere near like that fanatical streaming exposure.
Same with albums, where I think once an album gets a certain number of song plays, it counts as an album sale. The fact that somebody might have only listened to the same two songs multiple times and not heard the rest of it doesnt matter. That hugely impacts the ability of certain "types" of artists to make an impact and U2 are evidently one of them.
Curiously, even though Youre The Best Thing only got to about 93 or something in the charts, its subsequent plays over time are at an impressive 15 million now. That perhaps indicates that in this new streaming world, they still can draw big numbers, but they cant draw them in a concentrated enough rush to get chart recognition in light of the above.

Thanks for explaining.  So the direction of commercial music is in the hands of obsessive teenagers, how fabulous.

isn't that how it has always been???

c'mon, every major band in history started as a bunch of obsessive teenagers...most bands don't start with band members in their 40's...sorry to break it to you. 

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