Author Topic: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?  (Read 2423 times)

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Offline GoalisSoul40

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2018, 03:19:55 PM »
SOI has its moments and is overall very solid, but SOE is by far the superior album (in my opinion) and may end up being considered a late career masterpiece when all is said and done. SOI just falls a bit stale at times and, as I have noted elsewhere, seems too rooted in the band's personal, historical experiences in late 70s Dublin. SOE is more universal in its themes and appeal. I don't want to say SOE is more innovative (that would be the wrong word), but it seems fresher and resonates more than SOI. 

Offline Manos73

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2018, 05:39:53 PM »
I thought SOI was great when it came out. I still think it's decent. It doesn't have the lasting power of AB or even Pop. In comparison to SOE, it's so much better than SOE. What a wasted opportunity.

Offline Mercurial

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2018, 05:47:28 PM »
I really like both, but I haven't listened to SOI in a while. The only song I don't really like on SOE is American Soul, the music is good, but the lyrics....ugh. I went back and listened to its counterpart Volcano on SOI and it's so much better. I think they're a great "set" (SOI and SOE).

Offline suitoflights

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2018, 04:16:09 PM »
I think SOI is far superior to SOE. And probably their most consistent album since Achtung Baby. And I say that as a big fan of POP.

Offline Clarky

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2018, 05:14:02 PM »
SOI feels beige to me. I don't dislike it, but it doesn't contain any moments of joy or excitement.
SOE, at least after a couple of months, has moments of joy and feels more vibrant. I prefer that.

Offline soloyan

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2018, 11:23:42 AM »
My take on this is... give SOE 3 more years and then we can talk ;-)


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Offline ian ryan

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2018, 11:37:58 PM »
I think it's the fourth in their series of defining albums: Joshua Tree, Achtung Baby, All That You Can't Leave Behind, and Songs Of Innocence. Coming off this album, I'm very excited to see where they go.

Offline Billy Rhythm

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2018, 03:49:51 AM »
'Songs of Innocence' is their weakest album, in my opinion...  Thankfully, they redeemed themselves with 'Songs of Experience', the most concise record they've made since 'Pop'...  The first two songs on 'Innocence' are really good but it drops off of a cliff after that...  It's the same with 'All That You Can't Leave Behind' & 'How To Dismantle An Atomic Bomb' but atleast those two were front loaded with more than 2 good songs...:-)

Offline cocamojoe

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2018, 04:38:24 PM »
SOI is automatically better by default of its not having such cloyingly atrocious lyrics as does SOE, found especially on both GOOYOW and American Soul.

Offline BlueSquirrel

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2018, 01:37:46 PM »
I fell in love at first listen with Songs of innocence. It's a killer album imho. I love it as much as All that you can't leave behind. I still listen to it on a daily basis. Iris, Cedarwood Road, Song for someone, Every Breaking Wave, The Miracle of Joey Ramone, The Troubles, etc. It is packed with masterpieces. Some people believe that it is overproduced, but I fail to see why.
It has a wide range of sounds that I associate with U2 (great vocals, searing guitars / bass, chiming sounds, energetic drums, great vocals...overall a warm sound, powerful but light at the same time). I love the lyrics and the fact that many of the songs start quietly before building up into a passion / a rage.

I didn't have the same experience with, well, Songs of Experience. It seemed a harder-to-get-into kind of album (it felt like what I would possibly perceive as "overproduced" with the vocoder/electro touch right at the beginning in the first song, emphatic choirs that remind me more of Coldplay than U2 in some parts, and on top of that, the guitar sound which is sort of "muffled" or "turned down" a bit in the mix... ), but it has grown on me a lot lately. It's actually better with headphones on than played on the CD player (which is not necessarily the case with other U2 albums imho). The good performances on drums, bass and vocals (plus the "trippy" guitar solo on Lights of home) all do the trick. I'm not too keen on some of the lyrics, though (American Soul...). But You're the best thing about me and The Little things that give you away are quintessential U2.  Red Flag Day brings back the passion of the Boy / October era with excellent drums and bass (and sounds like The Cure a lot as well btw). Lights of home is unusual and beautiful. The Blackout is probably my favourite (it would have been a great album opener from my point of view). Love is bigger has good oh oh parts to sing along. I can imagine all of these songs sounding great live.
However, I still find Love is all we have left very difficult to get into.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2018, 05:54:46 AM by BlueSquirrel »

Offline boom boom

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2018, 05:42:54 AM »
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I fell in love at first listen with Songs of innocence. It's a killer album imho. I love it as much as All that you can't leave behind. I still listen to it on a daily basis. Iris, Cedarwood Road, Song for someone, Every Breaking Wave, The Miracle of Joey Ramone, The Troubles, etc. It is packed with masterpieces. Some people believe that it is overproduced, but I fail to see why.
It has a wide range of sounds that I associate with U2 (great vocals, searing guitars / bass, chiming sounds, energetic drums...overall a warm sound, powerful but light at the same time). I love the lyrics and the fact that many of the songs starts quietly before building up into a passion / a rage.

I didn't have the same experience with, well, Songs of Experience. It seemed a harder-to-get-into kind of album (it felt like what I would possibly perceive as "overproduced" with the vocoder/megaphone, emphatic choirs that remind me more of Coldplay than U2, and on top of that, the guitar sound which is sort of "muffled" or "turned down" a bit in the mix... ), but it has grown on me a lot lately. The good performances on drums, bass and vocals (plus the "trippy" guitar solo on Lights of home) do the trick. I'm not too keen on some of the lyrics, though (American Soul...). But The Little things that give you away is quintessential U2. Red Flag Day brings back the passion of the Boy / October era with excellent drums and bass (and sounds like The Cure a lot as well btw). Lights of home is unusual and beautiful. The Blackout is probably my favourite. Love is bigger has good oh oh parts to sing along... I can imagine all of these songs sounding great live.
However, I still find Love is all we have left very difficult to get into.
I agree, and also loved SOI on first listen and not so much SOE.  I also agree that for all the complaints that SOI was over-produced, I think that SOE is even more over-produced.

I also think that SOI is more rockier an album and SOE  has a more softer sound and feel to it, which has me wondering where did the Edge go on this album.  I know he is a minimalist guitar player in style, but he really disappeared on this album.

Lyrically I think the album is stronger than SOI slightly but doesn't back it up with the sound and feel.
Too many light feeling songs on it like Summer of Love, Landlady, Little things.  Also agree not really big on Love is all we have left,  just goes nowhere.  Album should have started off with Lights of Home.

Basically this album just sounds a bit tame and doesn't have that rock feel.  Maybe they chose the wrong mixes or just the production making it sound that way.

Hope on the next album they go a bit harder in sound.

Offline BlueSquirrel

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Re: Re-evaluating SOI: How does it stack up?
« Reply #26 on: February 27, 2018, 07:43:27 AM »
I think I see what you mean.

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Album should have started off with Lights of Home.

Good idea! I would have preferred "Lights of home" as an opener as well (and "Love is all we have left" as a conclusion even though it would have been perhaps a bit too obvious).

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I also think that SOI is more rockier an album and SOE  has a more softer sound and feel to it, which has me wondering where did the Edge go on this album.

Fortunately, the bass guitar and drums duo held on well throughout the all album (and esp. on Red Flag Day) but we probably could have done with more guitar on some of the tracks...

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I know he is a minimalist guitar player in style, but he really disappeared on this album.

Actually I remember reading somewhere that The Edge's daughter was really ill at some point - but thankfully she's ok nowadays. I don't know exactly when that happened, but if it was at the same time as the recording of that album, he probably took some time off from the band to nurse her back to health...

Anyway I like the way some of the songs on the album such as American Soul or The Blackout seem to be "propelled" by the guitar sound. The energy delivered in both is contagious and reminds me of Elevation / Vertigo. It makes you want to jump around. They will be massive live (and The Blackout could also be an interesting concert opener imo). The guitar work at the end of The Little Things is fantastic too (it has this U2 trademark sound imo).

I forgot to mention The Landlady. It's a beautifully-crafted intimate ballad with moving lyrics but I wish it sounded a bit more "atmospheric" or "experimental" like Promenade, Unknown Caller (great Edge solo and soulful drums btw), Fez Being Born or even "The Troubles", if you see what I mean.

To conclude, The Best Thing About Me is a worthy single. It's brilliantly catchy and upbeat! I love dancing to it and it gets a lot more airplay than The Miracle of Joey Ramone (to be fair, it is so effective that it is still played on a daily basis on at least four radio stations here...).
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 03:16:55 PM by BlueSquirrel »