Author Topic: Young fans  (Read 1660 times)

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Online laoghaire

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2018, 08:51:42 AM »
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Hope this link works. Not tried this before. Was a great thread on this topic that I recall. There are more young fans out there than you probably think but obviously not a core part of the fan base.

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Thanks, I will check that out. Sorry to be posting topics already covered, but I just joined yesterday.

Online laoghaire

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2018, 09:01:07 AM »
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I'm a teenage U2 fan. I've gotten a few of my friends into them too. I know they have young fans out there, but most are only into the hits. It's interesting because when I play them for my friends they usually like the music, but as soon as they see a picture and how old the band is they're turned off.

But its music. How does the way the band currently looks effect whether you enjoy the music or not?

It's a compliment in a way, because they were picturing a yound and relevant band, and were surprised to see fogeys.

I'm sorry to reveal such a shallow part of me, but I'd be lying if I said their looks didn't matter to me at all when I adopted them. But that was in 1988 and they are only 14 years older than me. They are still gorgeous to me, but if I were 11 now, 46 years is an awfully big gap. So, I get it, though it's a crying shame if that one thing got in the way of a young person who would otherwise feel like they spoke to them.

Offline u2dc

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2018, 11:06:38 AM »
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I'm a teenage U2 fan. I've gotten a few of my friends into them too. I know they have young fans out there, but most are only into the hits. It's interesting because when I play them for my friends they usually like the music, but as soon as they see a picture and how old the band is they're turned off.

But its music. How does the way the band currently looks effect whether you enjoy the music or not?

No idea. Teenagers are a tricky group of people like that.

Offline u2dc

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2018, 11:21:50 AM »
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I'm a teenage U2 fan. I've gotten a few of my friends into them too. I know they have young fans out there, but most are only into the hits. It's interesting because when I play them for my friends they usually like the music, but as soon as they see a picture and how old the band is they're turned off.

What hits in particular would a young person like if they liked any?

We do seem to have a bias against age. Honestly, I think even here in the land of fans most people feel like they can't possibly be that good anymore. I feel like I'm swimming against the tide when I think, no, they are better than ever.

But I understand about teens - these old guys can't possibly have anything relevant to say to you, right? And they indeed are on a different phase of life. They have a body of work from their youth but it is no longer relevant. For us geezers they are memories we explore, but not fresh new ideas anymore.

But it's possible - rare, but possible - to find resonance in a band from an older generation. I'm not from the Beatles' time but they do have things to say. Otis Redding was before my time, but I can find things to feel in his voice.

Beautiful Day and WOWY are definitely the favorites in my experience. The Best Thing was played a lot on the radio where I live and is actually a favorite among my friend group. I've been playing SOE as whole for them and Best Thing, GOOYOW, Red Flag Day, and Summer Of Love are the most well-received.

Online laoghaire

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2018, 11:47:19 AM »
I feel like Summer of Love could actually get some traction, if Spotify were to put it in rotation.

Offline Racingfan53

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2018, 01:51:28 PM »
I too am a high-school age U2 fan.  It wasn't my idea; it was my friend who got me into U2.

I know at least five people my age who would describe themselves as U2 fans, more than a few who went to the JT17 concert last year, and many, many more who like a lot of their songs.

Human nature doesn't change.  I find it funny how some of U2's 'older' fans tend to set up some sort of dichotomy between old music and new music.  The issue is not that this generation is inherently different from the last, but that U2 isn't cool for whatever reason.  There has always been bad music and good music, and always will be, but those of us who look for something deeper will love U2.

Here's the thing: I don't hate modern music either.  I have my own musical taste, and it happens to involve U2 because I genuinely believe they have some of the best (if not THE best) music out there.  I think they will last.  Just because new artists turn out new songs doesn't mean that teens won't like the old stuff: it's still new to us, and it speaks to us.  Just because I like Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran doesn't mean that U2 doesn't hold a special place in my heart.

Online laoghaire

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2018, 02:28:25 PM »
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I too am a high-school age U2 fan.  It wasn't my idea; it was my friend who got me into U2.

I know at least five people my age who would describe themselves as U2 fans, more than a few who went to the JT17 concert last year, and many, many more who like a lot of their songs.

Human nature doesn't change.  I find it funny how some of U2's 'older' fans tend to set up some sort of dichotomy between old music and new music.  The issue is not that this generation is inherently different from the last, but that U2 isn't cool for whatever reason.  There has always been bad music and good music, and always will be, but those of us who look for something deeper will love U2.

Here's the thing: I don't hate modern music either.  I have my own musical taste, and it happens to involve U2 because I genuinely believe they have some of the best (if not THE best) music out there.  I think they will last.  Just because new artists turn out new songs doesn't mean that teens won't like the old stuff: it's still new to us, and it speaks to us.  Just because I like Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran doesn't mean that U2 doesn't hold a special place in my heart.

You know FIVE people your age who would describe themselves as U2 fans?? I'm 41 and I don't think I ever knew another one (ok, my mother kind of was) and at this point in time you know FIVE? (mindblown)

You're totally right about the dichotomy we see, and I'm immersed in that myself. I am having a hard time seeing it any other way. It feels to us like things changed. The Internet, digital music downloads, YouTube. There was Baby Boomer rock and Gen X rock and as far as I can see rock pretty much died. U2 held on but their popularity turned against them. We tolerated Bono's big mouth back in the day but we feel more enlightened now.  I love the old songs but I can't imagine they aren't dated. I don't know, I can't wrap my head around it.

I love Bruno. A lot. I saw him in concert a few months ago - first concert I'd been to in decades. I love Bruno, but the show was very rushed, the sound wasn't great, and there was no showmanship. Really hit me how U2, and Bono really, put on a hell of a show including every little detail we wouldn't even think about. Bruno had pyrotechnics but crummy speakers, come on, man.

I haven't tried Ed yet. Have been meaning to give him a listen sometime.

Offline mythbustesr

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2018, 05:00:25 PM »
21 year old fan here. If I'm being honest, I think the train has left the station for getting a mass young audience again.
The general public has soured on them with the iTunes stuff and their incessant need to be relevant. A lot of people my age are getting into bands like New Order, The Cure, The Smiths etc etc and I think a lot of them would enjoy U2, but they can't. The music has no cultural weight anymore and people can't get past their current impressions of the band.

Even the Kendrick Lamar songs were met with a "lol" rather than, "oh, are U2 cool?". Kendrick doesn't exactly have a reputation of working with *cool* rock bands (see: Maroon 5 and Imagine Dragons collabs)

I was fortunate to grow up with U2's music, but it took a lot of work for me to get back into them. Once I was there I was obsessed, but I can't imagine convincing any of my friends to do the same.

Offline wons

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2018, 05:39:13 PM »
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I too am a high-school age U2 fan.  It wasn't my idea; it was my friend who got me into U2.

I know at least five people my age who would describe themselves as U2 fans, more than a few who went to the JT17 concert last year, and many, many more who like a lot of their songs.

Human nature doesn't change.  I find it funny how some of U2's 'older' fans tend to set up some sort of dichotomy between old music and new music.  The issue is not that this generation is inherently different from the last, but that U2 isn't cool for whatever reason.  There has always been bad music and good music, and always will be, but those of us who look for something deeper will love U2.

Here's the thing: I don't hate modern music either.  I have my own musical taste, and it happens to involve U2 because I genuinely believe they have some of the best (if not THE best) music out there.  I think they will last.  Just because new artists turn out new songs doesn't mean that teens won't like the old stuff: it's still new to us, and it speaks to us.  Just because I like Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran doesn't mean that U2 doesn't hold a special place in my heart.

You do realize that most of the music that Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran do is Pop or dance music or somewhere around those genre's. U2 is rock band and is focused primarily on the rock music genre. So its not just that these are different artist in terms of age, but their making music primarily in different genre's. I think a better question to ask would be which music genre do you prefer, Rock, Pop, or Dance?

Offline wons

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2018, 05:49:48 PM »
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. A lot of people my age are getting into bands like New Order, The Cure, The Smiths etc etc and I think a lot of them would enjoy U2, but they can't.

Those bands are the same age as U2 roughly, but they have a much smaller following than U2. The Smiths are not even a band anymore. New Orders latest album only made it to #34 in the United States compared to U2's latest which entered at #1. The Cure have never had an album go to #1 in the United States. Say what you will about U2 and young people, but overall I'd say the bands you list would not really be doing much better based on the overall statistics. I realize though that this is what you see among the people you know and is your personal experience.

Offline wons

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2018, 05:54:23 PM »
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I too am a high-school age U2 fan.  It wasn't my idea; it was my friend who got me into U2.

I know at least five people my age who would describe themselves as U2 fans, more than a few who went to the JT17 concert last year, and many, many more who like a lot of their songs.

Human nature doesn't change.  I find it funny how some of U2's 'older' fans tend to set up some sort of dichotomy between old music and new music.  The issue is not that this generation is inherently different from the last, but that U2 isn't cool for whatever reason.  There has always been bad music and good music, and always will be, but those of us who look for something deeper will love U2.

Here's the thing: I don't hate modern music either.  I have my own musical taste, and it happens to involve U2 because I genuinely believe they have some of the best (if not THE best) music out there.  I think they will last.  Just because new artists turn out new songs doesn't mean that teens won't like the old stuff: it's still new to us, and it speaks to us.  Just because I like Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran doesn't mean that U2 doesn't hold a special place in my heart.

You know FIVE people your age who would describe themselves as U2 fans?? I'm 41 and I don't think I ever knew another one (ok, my mother kind of was) and at this point in time you know FIVE? (mindblown)

When I was in High School, nearly everyone loved U2. When the Rattle And Hum film came out in the theaters, nearly everyone in our class when to see the film at the first showing after school. For Senior year, All I Want Is You was the prom theme. Not only were all my friends U2 fans, but I would say it was difficult to find someone in our age range that was not a U2 fan. We all went to Ireland on a Senior class trip, largely based on are fandom of U2. Went to Windmill Lane Studios, Bono's House etc. U2 dominated everything back then.


Watch this video below:

ZOO TV opening night MTV U2 fans:

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This is what it was like back then!
« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 05:56:22 PM by wons »

Offline mythbustesr

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2018, 06:36:48 PM »
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. A lot of people my age are getting into bands like New Order, The Cure, The Smiths etc etc and I think a lot of them would enjoy U2, but they can't.

Those bands are the same age as U2 roughly, but they have a much smaller following than U2. The Smiths are not even a band anymore. New Orders latest album only made it to #34 in the United States compared to U2's latest which entered at #1. The Cure have never had an album go to #1 in the United States. Say what you will about U2 and young people, but overall I'd say the bands you list would not really be doing much better based on the overall statistics. I realize though that this is what you see among the people you know and is your personal experience.

I guess my point bringing up those bands is that because U2 have continued to make music and push themselves into the mainstream, young people aren't able to look back at U2 in the same way. Despite U2 being an exciting and experimental band through the 80s and 90s, they will always just be seen as a pop band with some big hits.

It's a credit to U2 that they continue to make music (which is often great), but I think as they lose relevance, their legacy does too.

Offline wons

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2018, 06:43:02 PM »
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. A lot of people my age are getting into bands like New Order, The Cure, The Smiths etc etc and I think a lot of them would enjoy U2, but they can't.

Those bands are the same age as U2 roughly, but they have a much smaller following than U2. The Smiths are not even a band anymore. New Orders latest album only made it to #34 in the United States compared to U2's latest which entered at #1. The Cure have never had an album go to #1 in the United States. Say what you will about U2 and young people, but overall I'd say the bands you list would not really be doing much better based on the overall statistics. I realize though that this is what you see among the people you know and is your personal experience.

I guess my point bringing up those bands is that because U2 have continued to make music and push themselves into the mainstream, young people aren't able to look back at U2 in the same way. Despite U2 being an exciting and experimental band through the 80s and 90s, they will always just be seen as a pop band with some big hits.

It's a credit to U2 that they continue to make music (which is often great), but I think as they lose relevance, their legacy does too.

Well, its the risk every band has when they continue on after making it big. Breaking up or when someone dies always has a way of making someone or something legendary after a period of time or cementing their legacy.

But, when VH1 came out with the shows LEGENDS and BEHIND THE MUSIC, back in the 1990s, U2 were put in the small group of people in the LEGENDS category. So already back in 1998, U2 were considered one of the greatest bands of all time.

Offline summerholly

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2018, 07:11:15 PM »
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I too am a high-school age U2 fan.  It wasn't my idea; it was my friend who got me into U2.

I know at least five people my age who would describe themselves as U2 fans, more than a few who went to the JT17 concert last year, and many, many more who like a lot of their songs.

Human nature doesn't change.  I find it funny how some of U2's 'older' fans tend to set up some sort of dichotomy between old music and new music.  The issue is not that this generation is inherently different from the last, but that U2 isn't cool for whatever reason.  There has always been bad music and good music, and always will be, but those of us who look for something deeper will love U2.

Here's the thing: I don't hate modern music either.  I have my own musical taste, and it happens to involve U2 because I genuinely believe they have some of the best (if not THE best) music out there.  I think they will last.  Just because new artists turn out new songs doesn't mean that teens won't like the old stuff: it's still new to us, and it speaks to us.  Just because I like Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran doesn't mean that U2 doesn't hold a special place in my heart.

You do realize that most of the music that Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran do is Pop or dance music or somewhere around those genre's. U2 is rock band and is focused primarily on the rock music genre. So its not just that these are different artist in terms of age, but their making music primarily in different genre's. I think a better question to ask would be which music genre do you prefer, Rock, Pop, or Dance?

I don't really look at music in terms of Genre, more of what I enjoy.  I love Rock but I still really enjoy other Genre when I am in the mood like pop and country influences, what my parents listened to, and off course when you are a teenager or young adult a bands or artist's hotness also has its influences.  Just the way it is.  When you are young you are less likely to connect with people 40 years older that you.

Yeah also when a band or artist breaks up at the peak of their careers or even die sometimes they can become rediscovered by younger generations in a different way to band like U2 who keeps forging ahead and trying to remain relevant.  I personally discovered Janis Joplin long after she was dead for example and enjoyed hunting out old recordings and videos and her tumultuous story as an early woman of rock.  A legacy frozen in time.

Offline Luzita

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Re: Young fans
« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2018, 08:59:50 PM »
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

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