Author Topic: Young fans  (Read 1652 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Clarky

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 836
  • I've got a head like a lit cigarette
Re: Young fans
« Reply #30 on: March 24, 2018, 09:11:37 PM »
I'm 31 - no one I know is into U2 even half as much as I am but I don't know if that's a fair metric. I've given up on trying to be an evangelist of sorts, which I sort of was in my teen years. U2 just don't really enter the discussion anymore these days, which I've come to peace with.

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #31 on: March 24, 2018, 11:30:19 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I'm a teenage U2 fan. I've gotten a few of my friends into them too. I know they have young fans out there, but most are only into the hits. It's interesting because when I play them for my friends they usually like the music, but as soon as they see a picture and how old the band is they're turned off.

But its music. How does the way the band currently looks effect whether you enjoy the music or not?

As we discussed in a different thread, pop music fandom isn’t about just the music. Many  young people are very influenced by whether they think the musician is sexy or cool. Shallow but true.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 11:32:15 PM by Luzita »

Offline wons

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 600
Re: Young fans
« Reply #32 on: March 24, 2018, 11:49:07 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The problem with such an online poll for a fan website is that it tends to skew younger. Younger fans are more likely to take such a poll and be going to such a website. Its suggesting that about 40% of the fans are under 40. From what I have seen I think that only about 10% of the fans are under 40.

When you look at when U2 had their most successful and longest time in the mainstream, it was from 1985 to 1993. After 1993 until around 2000-2001, the band was not gaining significant number of new fans and was actually losing many people. Then 2000 through 2006, either the band gained back old fans, or brought in new, possibly younger fans, uncertain. 2007 through 2012 the fanbase remains roughly steady. Since 2012 the fansbase is shrinking again.

So your only significant growth spurts are 1985 to 1993 and 2000 to 2006. There is a question mark about the 2000 to 2006 because you don't know if the people are old fans coming back to the band or brand new fans.

1985 to 1993, most of these new fans in any of these years would probably be between the ages of 16 to 22. So as old as 22 in 1985 and as young as 16 in 1993. In 2018, that is an age range of 41 to 55. I think 80% are in the 41 to 55 age range, with 10% older and 10% younger. I think polling done at a concert would be more reliable than polling done at a website and that Its results would be similar to my estimates.

Offline NintendoFan204

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 44
  • Don't mind me... just some cool guy.
Re: Young fans
« Reply #33 on: March 25, 2018, 12:21:56 AM »
Prepare for a long post. I feel like writing tonight...

I am a young U2 fan (18, born 1999). We aren't as incredibly rare as you may think. A lot of us have parents who listened to U2 when we grew up. They had hits in three decades, so that certainly helps the age range of their fans. There were at least a few fans in my high school and I already know of a couple in my college. I am sure there are some other people that are fans and I just don't realize it. At least a dozen of my FB friends (who are my age) have liked their FB page, so they at least have a decent amount of young casual fans.

Now, what got me into U2? Well, I grew up hearing U2 in my household. They are the favorite band of everyone in my house (my parents and two brothers). ATYCLB and HTDAAB were newer when I was growing up, so they are filled with nostalgic memories whenever I hear them. ATYCLB is especially nostalgic since my parents played it a lot.

I started to listen to my own music in junior high. From around 2009-2014, I didn't really listen to U2 a lot. My dad played No Line On The Horizon a fair amount, but my family listened to them less frequently starting around this period. Around 2015 I was looking for music to listen to and I was struggling to find a band that I was really interested in. I got sick of Pandora and was using Spotify more and more. One night, I decided to listen to U2, who I hadn't listened to in quite awhile. I scrolled through their albums to see how many songs I recognized, and most of the song titles were familiar. I think I listened to ATYCLB that night (possibly some Zooropa as well).

Around this time, I really got into them. I was listening to a lot of their 2000s stuff and started jumping to their other albums as time passed. I rediscovered old childhood favorites (Beautiful Day, Mysterious Ways, Discotheque, etc.). I gained more interest in songs I didn't appreciate enough as a kid (WOWY, One, WGRYWH, Stay, etc.) I grew to love songs I recalled, but didn't know that all well (TTTYHATW, RHMT, Miracle Drug, etc). SOI was weird to hear since I knew none of the songs at first (my family never really played it when it came out). I didn't care for it at first, but it grew on me slowly and I know love it (just as I do all of their albums!)

At one point, I started listening to Pop. I loved Discotheque and Staring At The Sun as a kid, but a lot of the other songs were only sort of familiar to me. As I listened to each one, I started to slowly remember all of them. I noticed something else... every damn song was amazing! I got addicted to a different song every other day. During one of my earlier listens, I recall being shocked by how incredible those first seven tracks are (I love the bottom five as well, including Miami, but those first seven...). I was pretty confused and pi**ed when I found out the album was widely considered the black sheep of their catalogue since I had grown to love it so much. (Luckily, the reception has warmed over time, and these forums seem to like Pop quite a bit).

Pop is still my favorite album and U2 (for a few years now) is back to being my favorite band, just as they were when I was a kid. I saw them in Philly during Joshua Tree 30 with my family (who got back into them around when I did) and I loved it. I also have tickets for E+I! I missed out on so many years of the band because of when I was born, so I am trying to see them every time they come to Philadelphia.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2018, 12:23:29 AM by NintendoFan204 »

Offline summerholly

  • Refugee
  • *
  • Posts: 226
Re: Young fans
« Reply #34 on: March 25, 2018, 12:48:03 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #35 on: March 25, 2018, 01:29:26 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The problem with such an online poll for a fan website is that it tends to skew younger. Younger fans are more likely to take such a poll and be going to such a website. Its suggesting that about 40% of the fans are under 40. From what I have seen I think that only about 10% of the fans are under 40.

When you look at when U2 had their most successful and longest time in the mainstream, it was from 1985 to 1993. After 1993 until around 2000-2001, the band was not gaining significant number of new fans and was actually losing many people. Then 2000 through 2006, either the band gained back old fans, or brought in new, possibly younger fans, uncertain. 2007 through 2012 the fanbase remains roughly steady. Since 2012 the fansbase is shrinking again.

So your only significant growth spurts are 1985 to 1993 and 2000 to 2006. There is a question mark about the 2000 to 2006 because you don't know if the people are old fans coming back to the band or brand new fans.

1985 to 1993, most of these new fans in any of these years would probably be between the ages of 16 to 22. So as old as 22 in 1985 and as young as 16 in 1993. In 2018, that is an age range of 41 to 55. I think 80% are in the 41 to 55 age range, with 10% older and 10% younger. I think polling done at a concert would be more reliable than polling done at a website and that Its results would be similar to my estimates.

You’re right that this website’s poll isn’t necessarily completely representative. Online fandom might skew younger than fandom as a whole. On the other hand, given ticket prices, concert audiences might well skew older than fandom as a whole.

You say there is a question mark about the period 2000 - 2006, about whether it was old fans coming back or new young fans. From comments I’ve seen online, it was definitely both. Hard to know the proportions but I think U2 made a large number of new young fans in that period. If we use your age range and assume as old as 22 in 2000 and as young as 16 in 2006, this group would be between 28 and 40 today.

I actually think you’re overestimating ages a bit because, as we can see from many comments, lots of people get into a band in the tween age range, 11 or 12, rather than the actual teen years, so both age ranges should start about 4 years younger. Plus there is a steady stream of younger people who got into the band after they stopped being at the top of the charts due to being exposed by parents or older siblings or sometimes just discovering the band on their own.

It’s hard to know for sure but I suspect the survey isn’t far off. I’m at the older end myself, at 57, yet here I am online. We’ve reached the point where older people *are* usually online, esp. intelligent people, and I think U2 fandom skews smart.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2018, 02:17:53 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

I'm in that 13% too. The thing is, even people who became fans of the band in their very early period were often younger than the band, as opposed to being the same age like us. There's another chart in the survey that shows that. 22% became fans in 1983 or earlier:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Besides that, there are quite a few old 80s fans who bailed in the 90s. I was in that group myself until just a couple of years ago -- as I believe you were as well. I actually stopped following the band earlier than Pop -- I left with Achtung Baby, shocking as that may seem. Just couldn't get into the new sound. Only recently learned to love it. But there were actually a lot of people like me, and even more left with Zooropa and Pop, and many never came back. These would be people who still remember 80s U2 fondly, and maybe came out for JT30, but are no longer active fans. I think that's another reason the fandom is younger than you might think.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2018, 02:36:21 AM by Luzita »

Offline summerholly

  • Refugee
  • *
  • Posts: 226
Re: Young fans
« Reply #37 on: March 25, 2018, 04:53:04 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

I'm in that 13% too. The thing is, even people who became fans of the band in their very early period were often younger than the band, as opposed to being the same age like us. There's another chart in the survey that shows that. 22% became fans in 1983 or earlier:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Besides that, there are quite a few old 80s fans who bailed in the 90s. I was in that group myself until just a couple of years ago -- as I believe you were as well. I actually stopped following the band earlier than Pop -- I left with Achtung Baby, shocking as that may seem. Just couldn't get into the new sound. Only recently learned to love it. But there were actually a lot of people like me, and even more left with Zooropa and Pop, and many never came back. These would be people who still remember 80s U2 fondly, and maybe came out for JT30, but are no longer active fans. I think that's another reason the fandom is younger than you might think.

Yes very true and I am not sure what made me regain interest.  I have always had their early music in rotation on my ipod in recent years uploaded from  my various CDs.  I think it was after I saw Bono on a Michael Hutchence documentary and wondered what became of the band and then I came across a Kite vid and thought "oh I like that" and the emotion Bono had in it that I wondered what else I had missed.  I have had fun reading books and catching up on all the missed years made easier by the fact I now have satellite internet and can actually connect to the rest of the world lol.  Yes I also left after Achtung Baby which I loved.  I just find the band interesting and I admire Bono despite all the controversy that seems to follow him.

Offline 73October

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,169
  • Joy is an act of defiance
Re: Young fans
« Reply #38 on: March 25, 2018, 03:35:26 PM »
Young fans (and fans of all ages) should be following Inhaler.  They could shatter the electronic ceiling.

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #39 on: March 25, 2018, 03:58:10 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Young fans (and fans of all ages) should be following Inhaler.  They could shatter the electronic ceiling.
What is the electronic ceiling?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline 73October

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,169
  • Joy is an act of defiance
Re: Young fans
« Reply #40 on: March 25, 2018, 04:03:23 PM »
It's a figurative speech I made up.  Like the glass ceiling in business (women coming to more prevalence) - EDM, Electronica, hip-hop/grime is so prevalent that it needs to be shattered by the underground music scene if any other genre can break through.

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #41 on: March 25, 2018, 04:17:41 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
It's a figurative speech I made up.  Like the glass ceiling in business (women coming to more prevalence) - EDM, Electronica, hip-hop/grime is so prevalent that it needs to be shattered by the underground music scene if any other genre can break through.

Nice insight. It would be great if rock came back. I guess it's possible.

Offline JFW

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 837
  • Wondering why I still walk the earth
Re: Young fans
« Reply #42 on: March 25, 2018, 04:18:02 PM »
I'm 21, was 16 when I started listening. A year later I had to admit that I became a fan.

My sister (18) is liking SOE, she's humming it.

Other sister (16) likes some too, a bit.

Offline Luzita

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 315
Re: Young fans
« Reply #43 on: March 25, 2018, 09:23:28 PM »
I noticed another question in the survey that's really interesting: How old were you when you became a U2 fan?

I think we instinctively know it's when we're young that a band can really imprint on us. Something about those formative years, when the world is new, gives the music we encounter then greater resonance. The survey data backs up that impression. The results are valid regardless of whether the age profile of the respondents is representative of hardcore U2 fandom or not -- and I would think this psychology applies to all musical acts, not just U2.

22% became U2 fans at 12 or younger, 65% in their teen years, another 10% in their 20s, and less than 5% were 30 or older.

Results here:  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I love data!

Offline YouGoOn

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 24
Re: Young fans
« Reply #44 on: March 26, 2018, 01:27:39 PM »
I'm 31 (youngish?) and U2 is my favorite band.