Author Topic: Young fans  (Read 1356 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wons

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 300
Re: Young fans
« Reply #45 on: March 26, 2018, 02:04:03 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I noticed another question in the survey that's really interesting: How old were you when you became a U2 fan?

I think we instinctively know it's when we're young that a band can really imprint on us. Something about those formative years, when the world is new, gives the music we encounter then greater resonance. The survey data backs up that impression. The results are valid regardless of whether the age profile of the respondents is representative of hardcore U2 fandom or not -- and I would think this psychology applies to all musical acts, not just U2.

22% became U2 fans at 12 or younger, 65% in their teen years, another 10% in their 20s, and less than 5% were 30 or older.

Results here:  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I love data!

Actually its less than 2.5%  became fans after age 30. Its unbelievable how resistant people over 30 are to new music as this poll seems to suggest. I have my favorites of course, but I have gotten into Coldplay, Snow Patrol, The Killers after I when past 30.

Offline summerholly

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 160
Re: Young fans
« Reply #46 on: March 27, 2018, 03:08:35 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I noticed another question in the survey that's really interesting: How old were you when you became a U2 fan?

I think we instinctively know it's when we're young that a band can really imprint on us. Something about those formative years, when the world is new, gives the music we encounter then greater resonance. The survey data backs up that impression. The results are valid regardless of whether the age profile of the respondents is representative of hardcore U2 fandom or not -- and I would think this psychology applies to all musical acts, not just U2.

22% became U2 fans at 12 or younger, 65% in their teen years, another 10% in their 20s, and less than 5% were 30 or older.

Results here:  You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I love data!

Actually its less than 2.5%  became fans after age 30. Its unbelievable how resistant people over 30 are to new music as this poll seems to suggest. I have my favorites of course, but I have gotten into Coldplay, Snow Patrol, The Killers after I when past 30.

Yes I have got into bands past 30. I was in my early thirties when Pearl Jam, Smashing Pumpkins, Nirvana came on the scene although the word fan is probably not a word I associate myself too often or with those bands, I just enjoyed their music without wanting to get into the band in detail.   I was more likely to be a fan when when I was much younger.

Offline tarheelmch

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 14
Re: Young fans
« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2018, 08:25:16 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

I'm in that 13% too. The thing is, even people who became fans of the band in their very early period were often younger than the band, as opposed to being the same age like us. There's another chart in the survey that shows that. 22% became fans in 1983 or earlier:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Besides that, there are quite a few old 80s fans who bailed in the 90s. I was in that group myself until just a couple of years ago -- as I believe you were as well. I actually stopped following the band earlier than Pop -- I left with Achtung Baby, shocking as that may seem. Just couldn't get into the new sound. Only recently learned to love it. But there were actually a lot of people like me, and even more left with Zooropa and Pop, and many never came back. These would be people who still remember 80s U2 fondly, and maybe came out for JT30, but are no longer active fans. I think that's another reason the fandom is younger than you might think.

Yes very true and I am not sure what made me regain interest.  I have always had their early music in rotation on my ipod in recent years uploaded from  my various CDs.  I think it was after I saw Bono on a Michael Hutchence documentary and wondered what became of the band and then I came across a Kite vid and thought "oh I like that" and the emotion Bono had in it that I wondered what else I had missed.  I have had fun reading books and catching up on all the missed years made easier by the fact I now have satellite internet and can actually connect to the rest of the world lol.  Yes I also left after Achtung Baby which I loved.  I just find the band interesting and I admire Bono despite all the controversy that seems to follow him.

This is so interesting because it's my story as well. I left after Achtung Baby, really after the Zoo TV Outside Broadcast shows, because as groundbreaking as they were, they were so huge there was no sense of intimacy. It was just too big for me.
I came back in 2001, in October specifically. ATYCLB had been out for a while, but then 9/11 happened. The songs on that album just resonated with me after that. Then I saw them in a 12,000 seat venue that October, and I've been back ever since. It sometimes still takes me a year or two to really get into a new album, but I eventually always do. I got into SOE immediately, though.

Offline Luzita

  • Refugee
  • *
  • Posts: 219
Re: Young fans
« Reply #48 on: March 27, 2018, 02:38:01 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

I'm in that 13% too. The thing is, even people who became fans of the band in their very early period were often younger than the band, as opposed to being the same age like us. There's another chart in the survey that shows that. 22% became fans in 1983 or earlier:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Besides that, there are quite a few old 80s fans who bailed in the 90s. I was in that group myself until just a couple of years ago -- as I believe you were as well. I actually stopped following the band earlier than Pop -- I left with Achtung Baby, shocking as that may seem. Just couldn't get into the new sound. Only recently learned to love it. But there were actually a lot of people like me, and even more left with Zooropa and Pop, and many never came back. These would be people who still remember 80s U2 fondly, and maybe came out for JT30, but are no longer active fans. I think that's another reason the fandom is younger than you might think.

Yes very true and I am not sure what made me regain interest.  I have always had their early music in rotation on my ipod in recent years uploaded from  my various CDs.  I think it was after I saw Bono on a Michael Hutchence documentary and wondered what became of the band and then I came across a Kite vid and thought "oh I like that" and the emotion Bono had in it that I wondered what else I had missed.  I have had fun reading books and catching up on all the missed years made easier by the fact I now have satellite internet and can actually connect to the rest of the world lol.  Yes I also left after Achtung Baby which I loved.  I just find the band interesting and I admire Bono despite all the controversy that seems to follow him.

This is so interesting because it's my story as well. I left after Achtung Baby, really after the Zoo TV Outside Broadcast shows, because as groundbreaking as they were, they were so huge there was no sense of intimacy. It was just too big for me.
I came back in 2001, in October specifically. ATYCLB had been out for a while, but then 9/11 happened. The songs on that album just resonated with me after that. Then I saw them in a 12,000 seat venue that October, and I've been back ever since. It sometimes still takes me a year or two to really get into a new album, but I eventually always do. I got into SOE immediately, though.

It sounds like you experienced something that many fans did, leaving in the 90s and coming back with ATYCLB. Summerholly and I are in a different category, because we came back much more recently.

Offline skelter

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,224
  • Drowning is no sin
Re: Young fans
« Reply #49 on: March 27, 2018, 02:42:48 PM »
Oh, another thread of moms to blog post about their precocious children.

From where I stood in jt2017, I saw 20-somethings. I'm 20-something. If I stood 10 feet to the right, my limited demographic view might be different. Moot point.

Offline laoghaire

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 108
Re: Young fans
« Reply #50 on: March 27, 2018, 05:49:01 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Oh, another thread of moms to blog post about their precocious children.

Lol, my daughter informed me yesterday that she NEVER SAID she liked them. Sigh. Would have been fun.

I assume you meant precious, nothing precocious about that exchange, lol.

Offline summerholly

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 160
Re: Young fans
« Reply #51 on: March 28, 2018, 08:08:03 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We know U2 do have some teenage fans, and we also know the majority of their fans are older, but from anecdotal stories we can’t say more than that. “We need data!” shouts my inner science geek.

Fortunately, there’s data right on this site, which periodically conducts surveys. The last one was in 2016, and over 4,000 people responded. I think that’s a pretty good sample of the hardcore fan community (at least the ones who are active online). One of the questions asked was age. A little over 4% were teenagers and 12% were in their 20s. Here are the results:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I find it interesting that only 13% of their fan base are the people that grew up with them and are the same age as them like me!  Maybe they were the ones that deserted in the Pop era?  I know I wasn't into that era in fact I barely remember even hearing music from Pop in the radio where I lived.  I was in to other bands in that time frame and U2 were not really on my radar.

I'm in that 13% too. The thing is, even people who became fans of the band in their very early period were often younger than the band, as opposed to being the same age like us. There's another chart in the survey that shows that. 22% became fans in 1983 or earlier:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Besides that, there are quite a few old 80s fans who bailed in the 90s. I was in that group myself until just a couple of years ago -- as I believe you were as well. I actually stopped following the band earlier than Pop -- I left with Achtung Baby, shocking as that may seem. Just couldn't get into the new sound. Only recently learned to love it. But there were actually a lot of people like me, and even more left with Zooropa and Pop, and many never came back. These would be people who still remember 80s U2 fondly, and maybe came out for JT30, but are no longer active fans. I think that's another reason the fandom is younger than you might think.

Yes very true and I am not sure what made me regain interest.  I have always had their early music in rotation on my ipod in recent years uploaded from  my various CDs.  I think it was after I saw Bono on a Michael Hutchence documentary and wondered what became of the band and then I came across a Kite vid and thought "oh I like that" and the emotion Bono had in it that I wondered what else I had missed.  I have had fun reading books and catching up on all the missed years made easier by the fact I now have satellite internet and can actually connect to the rest of the world lol.  Yes I also left after Achtung Baby which I loved.  I just find the band interesting and I admire Bono despite all the controversy that seems to follow him.

This is so interesting because it's my story as well. I left after Achtung Baby, really after the Zoo TV Outside Broadcast shows, because as groundbreaking as they were, they were so huge there was no sense of intimacy. It was just too big for me.
I came back in 2001, in October specifically. ATYCLB had been out for a while, but then 9/11 happened. The songs on that album just resonated with me after that. Then I saw them in a 12,000 seat venue that October, and I've been back ever since. It sometimes still takes me a year or two to really get into a new album, but I eventually always do. I got into SOE immediately, though.

The weird thing is that I like their old music even better now than I did when it was new.  Maybe because I didn't listen to it much for so long.  It is like a discovery of something good that was missing for a very long time.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2018, 08:10:53 AM by summerholly »

Offline trainfanjacob8

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 39
  • Worst things in the world are justified by belief
Re: Young fans
« Reply #52 on: April 01, 2018, 11:07:40 AM »
I'm in my early 20s and I, like others my age, got into U2 in 2005 because my Dad is a huge U2 fan.  I know a few U2 fans my age, but not too many.  Some are dedicated fans; many haven't heard of them before, some only know Bono, the Apple-U2 incident, or they like BD, Streets, and ISHFWILF and that's it.

Offline wons

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 300
Re: Young fans
« Reply #53 on: April 01, 2018, 10:42:58 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Oh, another thread of moms to blog post about their precocious children.

From where I stood in jt2017, I saw 20-somethings. I'm 20-something. If I stood 10 feet to the right, my limited demographic view might be different. Moot point.

I was on the field at both shows and it seemed like there was no one in their 20s and 30s. Nearly all seemed to be 40 and up, with the exception of people who brought their children who were most likely under age 20.