Author Topic: Catholic Guilt & U2  (Read 1022 times)

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Offline robert

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Catholic Guilt & U2
« on: April 24, 2018, 10:46:27 AM »
I read somewhere that Bono said in an interview that he thought his poetry or song writing in U2, is non doubt due
to some sort of catholic guilt.
And I was thinking today, that I think this is the reason why I like them so much as well.
In particular albums like POP or to a certain extend Achtung Baby.
Does any one else agree with this?
I mean I've never even been to church but I just feel this way.
Just wondering?



Offline miryclay

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2018, 04:36:31 PM »
Catholic guilt is the big part of the Irish emotional landscape. It has to seep in somehow.

Offline summerholly

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2018, 04:32:13 AM »
I didn't think that Bono was a catholic. Although his father was a Catholic, wasn't his mother a Protestant and she raised him as such?  I got the feeling that although Bono is a Christian he doesn't align himself to specific religions.

Offline Rasmus

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2018, 04:56:33 AM »
I agree with you OP and also that it comes through in some albums more than others. Pop is probably the best example and also SOE to a certain extent.

Offline JTNash

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2018, 09:42:33 AM »
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I didn't think that Bono was a catholic. Although his father was a Catholic, wasn't his mother a Protestant and she raised him as such?  I got the feeling that although Bono is a Christian he doesn't align himself to specific religions.
the schools in Ireland are largely Catholic so he Iím sure got some Catholic teaching

Offline summerholly

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2018, 07:02:12 PM »
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I didn't think that Bono was a catholic. Although his father was a Catholic, wasn't his mother a Protestant and she raised him as such?  I got the feeling that although Bono is a Christian he doesn't align himself to specific religions.
the schools in Ireland are largely Catholic so he Iím sure got some Catholic teaching

Yes most likely.  Mind you I went to convents most of my schooling because of where I lived and got lots of Catholic tuition from the nuns, who were actually quite nice, and really I am none the wiser about Catholicism and Catholic guilt whatever that is lol, it wasn't really my thing.

Offline Luzita

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2018, 10:07:21 PM »
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I didn't think that Bono was a catholic. Although his father was a Catholic, wasn't his mother a Protestant and she raised him as such?  I got the feeling that although Bono is a Christian he doesn't align himself to specific religions.

Youíre right, though Bonoís father was Catholic he was raised Protestant. However, Ireland is such a heavily Catholic country Iím sure he picked up some Catholic guilt by osmosis.

Mind you I think the guilt trip stuff is specifically Irish Catholic. I am Latina and was raised Catholic ó not in a very religious family but my cultural surroundings were Catholic ó and guilt was never a big thing.


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Online laoghaire

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2018, 06:41:37 AM »
It's baked into the culture. I don't know if it's still as big of a cultural feature today, but in my family it was passed down two generations from the last Irish family member, that's how pervasive it is.

I read that book by that Irish guy who came to America and became a teacher - my memory is worth nothing these days, I know his name but can't dig it out. But in the book that describes coming to and settling in New York, wow, that Irish Catholic guilt is a massive and toxic thing. And I seriously doubt a guy growing up there in the 60s, 70s, and 80s could be untouched by it, even if only one parent was Catholic.

Offline miryclay

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2018, 07:39:52 AM »
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I didn't think that Bono was a catholic. Although his father was a Catholic, wasn't his mother a Protestant and she raised him as such?  I got the feeling that although Bono is a Christian he doesn't align himself to specific religions.
the schools in Ireland are largely Catholic so he Iím sure got some Catholic teaching

All of U2 went to a non-denominational Secondary School.

Offline miryclay

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2018, 07:42:15 AM »
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It's baked into the culture. I don't know if it's still as big of a cultural feature today, but in my family it was passed down two generations from the last Irish family member, that's how pervasive it is.

I read that book by that Irish guy who came to America and became a teacher - my memory is worth nothing these days, I know his name but can't dig it out. But in the book that describes coming to and settling in New York, wow, that Irish Catholic guilt is a massive and toxic thing. And I seriously doubt a guy growing up there in the 60s, 70s, and 80s could be untouched by it, even if only one parent was Catholic.

Are you speaking of "Teacher Man" by Frank McCourt? He also wrote "Tis".

Offline summerholly

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2018, 09:34:54 AM »
Well my Grandmother was Irish and definitely religious as she and I had lots of debates on the subject when I was younger and she was still alive but I had to google catholic guilt to understand what it meant.   I don't think she suffered from it, she was a very practical woman! but I have seen documentaries set in the sixties era that depicted it and yes it was pretty pervasive in that culture.  From what I read of Bono's father he didn't seem the type. 

I think Bono inherently is quite a conflicted person struggling with a lot of stuff from his childhood.

Offline miryclay

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2018, 10:11:06 AM »
I think it has been phased out socially in 21st Century Ireland. But very much alive in mid to early20th century. 

Online laoghaire

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2018, 10:44:21 AM »
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It's baked into the culture. I don't know if it's still as big of a cultural feature today, but in my family it was passed down two generations from the last Irish family member, that's how pervasive it is.

I read that book by that Irish guy who came to America and became a teacher - my memory is worth nothing these days, I know his name but can't dig it out. But in the book that describes coming to and settling in New York, wow, that Irish Catholic guilt is a massive and toxic thing. And I seriously doubt a guy growing up there in the 60s, 70s, and 80s could be untouched by it, even if only one parent was Catholic.

Are you speaking of "Teacher Man" by Frank McCourt? He also wrote "Tis".

Frank McCourt, yes, thank you.

Offline Luzita

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2018, 11:21:57 AM »
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It's baked into the culture. I don't know if it's still as big of a cultural feature today, but in my family it was passed down two generations from the last Irish family member, that's how pervasive it is.

I read that book by that Irish guy who came to America and became a teacher - my memory is worth nothing these days, I know his name but can't dig it out. But in the book that describes coming to and settling in New York, wow, that Irish Catholic guilt is a massive and toxic thing. And I seriously doubt a guy growing up there in the 60s, 70s, and 80s could be untouched by it, even if only one parent was Catholic.

Are you speaking of "Teacher Man" by Frank McCourt? He also wrote "Tis".

Frank McCourt, yes, thank you.
I think the really famous book he wrote was Angelaís Ashes, wasnít it


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Online laoghaire

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Re: Catholic Guilt & U2
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2018, 01:12:14 PM »
Yeah, that's it, but I think I just read 'Tis.

I think the Catholic guilt works in different ways on different people. Some rebel - but still feel consumed by it. Some fall to it. Some appear to have shrugged it off but it's embedded in their souls. The Irish person in my family appeared mostly immune to it but she certainly taught it to her daughter and grandchildren, and it was revealed in certain ways.