Author Topic: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof  (Read 2012 times)

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Offline summerholly

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2018, 09:09:14 PM »
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Adam was born in England and has always had an English accent, but he lives in Brazil now.
Edge was born in Wales and has always had a Welsh accent, but he lives in California now.
The Irish and American accents have blend very closely, and now that Bono lives mostly in New York, his accent has shifted a bit.


He? I didn't know that Adam lives in Brazil.. I think he and his wife live in London.
Also I don't think Bono lives mostly in NY. In the summer the family lives in Eze, South of France.
I think the family stayed in NY for 2 years or so, when the had some construction work at their Killiney house. This was in 2006 or so.
But I remember an interview of last year where Bono said that he has a feeling of what a home is when he is in Irland.


My basic point is that accents donít behave according to where you associate a person being from. I was born in America, but Iím also an English citizen, and Iíve spent a lot of time living in Spain. Iíve had a number of people ask me where my accent is from, even though I live in the state I was born in. Itís hard to define an accent based on where a person lives or where they were born. Accents adapt to where a person is.

Yes this is true, I have lived in quite a few different countries growing up and have had various accents although most people detected a hint of the country that I was in before and would ask, there was always something a little different probably based on my parents accent.  Theirs never seemed to change much.  Funny because when I travel overseas without fail people pick my accent as Australian, whereas people in Australia detect that there is something else in there.

Offline DaleAnny

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2018, 02:45:07 PM »
Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

Offline MissSarajevo

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2018, 03:36:21 PM »
All I can think of are references to places in Dublin such as Cedarwood Road and Seven Towers (Running to Stand Still)

Offline Luzita

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #33 on: September 12, 2018, 12:52:49 AM »
An Cat Dubh (song title) is in Irish. Gloria has lines in Latin (Catholic connection).

Sunday Bloody Sunday refers to Irish history.


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Offline DaleAnny

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #34 on: September 12, 2018, 12:42:10 PM »
MissSarajevo, Luzita, thanks a lot!

Offline Smee

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2018, 07:37:52 AM »
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I'd agree with what daveyg says about the bands accents.

Regarding the question as to whether Irish accents are vulnerable to being swallowed by American accents I would say no.  There are parts of Dublin and the surrounding counties where this might be the case and I don't say that as a criticism but as an observation.   What is commonly referred to as the D4 accent seems to be a constantly evolving abomination of an Oirish accent  ;) .  Many of the newer broadcasters speak with such an accent.  ( Am I coming across as a grumpy old fart?) If you go beyond the pale you will find plenty of local accents that are difficult to understand.
Thanks for the comment. Itís fascinating to learn there is such a thing as a ďD4Ē accent. I figured there would probably be different kinds of Dublin accents, just like there are different New York accents.

When I was in Ireland I didnít run across any people that were hard to understand. Also didnít encounter any that werenít pleasant to listen to. Granted I was only there for 10 days. In Britain there are definitely accents that are both ugly-sounding and almost indecipherable to an American. Scotland was the worst.


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As a proud Scot. i take offence at my fellow countrymen and womens accents being classed as "ugly" #Cheek

Offline david

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2018, 05:33:03 PM »
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Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

There are loads, but you probably won't find much insight on a forum like this.

Bono is very influenced by Irish poets such as WB Years, Seamus Heaney and others,at times he even directly quotes their words verbatim in his songs. Mofo and Peace on Earth are two examples of this. They have numerous songs which deal with the Irish troubles, Please, The Troubles, Sunday Bloody Sunday, Raised by Wolves are just a few off the top of my head. Honestly there are so many Irish cultural references in U2 songs it would be impossible to list them all off here. Great idea for a Master's dissertation though!

Offline Luzita

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #37 on: October 03, 2018, 08:22:45 PM »
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Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

There are loads, but you probably won't find much insight on a forum like this.

Bono is very influenced by Irish poets such as WB Years, Seamus Heaney and others,at times he even directly quotes their words verbatim in his songs. Mofo and Peace on Earth are two examples of this. They have numerous songs which deal with the Irish troubles, Please, The Troubles, Sunday Bloody Sunday, Raised by Wolves are just a few off the top of my head. Honestly there are so many Irish cultural references in U2 songs it would be impossible to list them all off here. Great idea for a Master's dissertation though!
Can you give some examples of direct quotes from these poets?


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Online Tortuga

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #38 on: October 04, 2018, 05:35:43 AM »
Edgeís frequent use of drone strings could be seen as being related to the Irish uillean pipes.


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Offline ShankAsu

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #39 on: November 13, 2018, 03:24:44 PM »
Irish accents are too exclusive.  The band now has European accents approved by Juncker.

Offline david

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #40 on: November 14, 2018, 03:43:19 PM »
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Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

There are loads, but you probably won't find much insight on a forum like this.

Bono is very influenced by Irish poets such as WB Years, Seamus Heaney and others,at times he even directly quotes their words verbatim in his songs. Mofo and Peace on Earth are two examples of this. They have numerous songs which deal with the Irish troubles, Please, The Troubles, Sunday Bloody Sunday, Raised by Wolves are just a few off the top of my head. Honestly there are so many Irish cultural references in U2 songs it would be impossible to list them all off here. Great idea for a Master's dissertation though!
Can you give some examples of direct quotes from these poets?


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Sorry for not replying until now. In the song Peace on Earth Bono sings 'we hear it every Christmas time but hope and history won't rhyme'. That is a direct quotation from Seamus Heaney. Similarly during Mofo Bono refers to a 'god shaped hole' and 'the face I had before the world was made'. More learned people than me could tell you the poems but they are references to WB Yeats. In a more general sense Bono has referred to the poet Brendan Kennelly as an influence in his recent writing for the 'experience' albums. Kennelly told him to 'write as if he was dead'. I hope this is some help.

Offline Luzita

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #41 on: November 14, 2018, 03:53:38 PM »
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Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

There are loads, but you probably won't find much insight on a forum like this.

Bono is very influenced by Irish poets such as WB Years, Seamus Heaney and others,at times he even directly quotes their words verbatim in his songs. Mofo and Peace on Earth are two examples of this. They have numerous songs which deal with the Irish troubles, Please, The Troubles, Sunday Bloody Sunday, Raised by Wolves are just a few off the top of my head. Honestly there are so many Irish cultural references in U2 songs it would be impossible to list them all off here. Great idea for a Master's dissertation though!
Can you give some examples of direct quotes from these poets?


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Sorry for not replying until now. In the song Peace on Earth Bono sings 'we hear it every Christmas time but hope and history won't rhyme'. That is a direct quotation from Seamus Heaney. Similarly during Mofo Bono refers to a 'god shaped hole' and 'the face I had before the world was made'. More learned people than me could tell you the poems but they are references to WB Yeats. In a more general sense Bono has referred to the poet Brendan Kennelly as an influence in his recent writing for the 'experience' albums. Kennelly told him to 'write as if he was dead'. I hope this is some help.

Yes, thanks! I've heard him refer to "writing as if dead" but didn't know those direct quotes. The "god shaped hole" is sort of part of the language now though.  Didn't know it originated with Yeats.

Offline miryclay

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Re: U2's Irish Accents -- or Lack Thereof
« Reply #42 on: November 14, 2018, 03:55:16 PM »
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Hello guys!
I`m new here and I`m here because I`m writing a graduation paper for my master`s degree and it is devoted to U2 and the cultural features in the language of their lyrics.
I see that you are discussing the accents here, so here is my request to you (you are much more experts in U2 and in language than I am, so I would be grateful to you if you could help me): is there any songs where the Irish culture and Irish history is well seen in the language?
Thank you so much in advance !

There are loads, but you probably won't find much insight on a forum like this.

Bono is very influenced by Irish poets such as WB Years, Seamus Heaney and others,at times he even directly quotes their words verbatim in his songs. Mofo and Peace on Earth are two examples of this. They have numerous songs which deal with the Irish troubles, Please, The Troubles, Sunday Bloody Sunday, Raised by Wolves are just a few off the top of my head. Honestly there are so many Irish cultural references in U2 songs it would be impossible to list them all off here. Great idea for a Master's dissertation though!
Can you give some examples of direct quotes from these poets?


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