Author Topic: Is the sound of concerts too loud?  (Read 1416 times)

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Offline Gavin82

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #30 on: October 20, 2018, 02:33:00 PM »
Last night was ok my esrs were not ringing like when i seen ACDC @ Wembley in 2015

rockatansky

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #31 on: October 21, 2018, 07:33:14 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

Yeah, it's always my fellow 60 year olds that get the blame for everything...   :-[

Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #32 on: October 21, 2018, 09:25:58 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

They don't target the sound level to people at certain ages because EVERYONE AGES DIFFERENTLY! So that would be impossible. The fact is, most people had no problems with the show enjoyed it and enjoyed the sound. Those that had problems are in the minority. Its more likely that age related hearing problems explain what they experience since most people in the audience did not. Most people at age 50 will be fine, but there will be a certain percentage that will not be able to take the sound levels or it sounds distorted, not because anything U2 did, but because the decline in hearing that a certain percentage of people experience over time.

Ear plugs, musicians ear plugs can help with this. They reduce the sound level and give you a better mix of what is being played. Buy them and wear them every time you see a band playing live, or go to a night club or anywhere the sound level is as loud as or louder than your lawn mower.

Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #33 on: October 21, 2018, 09:30:40 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

Yeah, it's always my fellow 60 year olds that get the blame for everything...   :-[

Well, you can't change what U2 and Joe are doing with the sound, which is most likely the same thing they have done through out their career.  But you can get a hearing check up and also buy a good pair of musicians ear plugs. I don't think U2 and Joe are doing something different or radical with the sound that is suddenly causing fans problems. Its more likely the small percentage of fans who say the sound is bad or too loud are experience age related hearing problems which is normal for a certain percentage of the population. So get the musicians ear plugs. They will allow you to turn down the sound level and will improve the mix for you!

Offline Tortuga

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #34 on: October 22, 2018, 01:37:55 PM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear “professional musicians earplugs”.


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Offline SwimmingSorrows

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2018, 12:07:49 AM »
No, concerts are loud for a reason.  Only band I saw that I would saw was too loud was Fleetwood Mac, not because my ears hurt but because the sound was distorted on all but the acoustic songs.  I didn't think U2 sounded badly distorted when I saw them, and the shows just wouldn't have as strong an impact without intense volume.  Rock and roll.

Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2018, 07:14:14 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear “professional musicians earplugs”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Offline Tortuga

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2018, 10:10:41 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear “professional musicians earplugs”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Yeah I get the crowd noise problem.  I’ve experienced that at quieter shows and it is a valid point.

Just let me say.  I’ve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time I’ve had this issue.  My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasn’t for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.

You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  I’m sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2’s part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


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Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2018, 11:19:11 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear “professional musicians earplugs”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Just let me say.  I’ve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time I’ve had this issue. 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Which is why getting your ears checked would be a good thing. There is always a first time when a person starts to notice their hearing problems.


Quote
My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasn’t for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.



I would leave to if I did not have my ear plugs, but that has been my position now for 15 years. Without ear plugs, I don't go to concerts, night clubs, and many bars. I even wear them to mow the lawn. I imagine your wife is about the same age, maybe it would be good to have a hearing check up as well. I get a check up every two years, primarily to clean the wax build up always caused by using ear plugs in so many different situations.

 An isolated postion in the venue where the sound is bad is possible. But that was much more likely in the early days than now given the technology.


Quote
You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  I’m sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2’s part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


              I like lots of bands but I don't post on message boards for bands that I feel have albums that are less than stellar and or disappointing shows. I don't have time to do that. There is a personality trait out where people tend to only comment when they have something negative to say. As BONO said, remember what bathroom walls used to look like before the internet?

              I'm much more in the group of, if you have nothing nice to say, don't say anything at all. This is a U2 FAN FORUM. It should not be a surprise to anyone that there are forum members who will defend the band on any issue.

Offline Tortuga

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2018, 11:39:05 AM »
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear “professional musicians earplugs”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Just let me say.  I’ve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time I’ve had this issue. 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Which is why getting your ears checked would be a good thing. There is always a first time when a person starts to notice their hearing problems.


Quote
My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasn’t for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.



I would leave to if I did not have my ear plugs, but that has been my position now for 15 years. Without ear plugs, I don't go to concerts, night clubs, and many bars. I even wear them to mow the lawn. I imagine your wife is about the same age, maybe it would be good to have a hearing check up as well. I get a check up every two years, primarily to clean the wax build up always caused by using ear plugs in so many different situations.

 An isolated postion in the venue where the sound is bad is possible. But that was much more likely in the early days than now given the technology.


Quote
You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  I’m sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2’s part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


              I like lots of bands but I don't post on message boards for bands that I feel have albums that are less than stellar and or disappointing shows. I don't have time to do that. There is a personality trait out where people tend to only comment when they have something negative to say. As BONO said, remember what bathroom walls used to look like before the internet?

              I'm much more in the group of, if you have nothing nice to say, don't say anything at all. This is a U2 FAN FORUM. It should not be a surprise to anyone that there are forum members who will defend the band on any issue.

As I clearly stated, we both used ear plugs and I have used them since high school.  The problem persisted with the earplugs.  The sound was still badly distorted.

I understand your opinion of what it means to be a fan and I’m fine with that for you.  I don’t understand why you feel the need to define what it should mean for me and why you feel justified in insulting me because I have a different definition.  Why don’t we stick to discussing the point of the posts and leave the personal critical commentary out.


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Online BlueSquirrel

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2018, 01:41:04 PM »
I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 01:50:44 PM by BlueSquirrel »

Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2018, 06:31:40 PM »
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Offline Tortuga

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Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2018, 07:30:10 PM »
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  I’ve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I don’t see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didn’t blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

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« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 07:55:52 PM by Tortuga »

Offline wons

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2018, 07:20:56 AM »
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  I’ve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I don’t see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didn’t blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

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There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.

Offline Tortuga

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Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2018, 08:18:21 AM »
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  I’ve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I don’t see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didn’t blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.

Okay, my hearing is fine and so is that of the three other people I went with that thought the speaker was blown or something.


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