Author Topic: Are the hits the best songs?  (Read 197 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline laoghaire

  • Staring at the Sun
  • **
  • Posts: 1,290
  • I love the peaceful life.
Are the hits the best songs?
« on: November 30, 2018, 06:31:40 AM »
Do die hards get snobbish about hits?



Offline bonorules

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 391
Re: Are the hits the best songs?
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2018, 08:20:40 AM »
I feel that many of the hits are their best songs, but there are also a few non-hits that I think are some of their best work. I'm also one of those fans who likes pretty much all U2 songs, so I may not be the best judge for what is a great song and what isn't. :)

Yes, there are some die hards that get very snobbish about the hits. They seem to feel that it makes them better than others to say that WOWY is a bad song while praising Acrobat as the greatest song ever written.

Offline Vox

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,136
  • Time is irrelevant, it's not linear.
Re: Are the hits the best songs?
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2018, 08:52:23 AM »
Maybe.  I look at it like this:  when I start getting into a band, it’s usually the “hits” that get me into the band, but it’s the deeper tracks that really make me fall in love with them.  It was like this for me and U2.  It was the same thing that happened with other big artists I’d consider to my others favorites throughout my life, such as The Doors, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, David Bowie, Muse, etc., etc., etc.

I remember reading a good analogy about this many years ago.  A lot of people like the Eagles song “Hotel California.”  How many times do you think you’ve heard “Hotel California” throughout your life?  Now how many times have you willingly “put on” on the song “Hotel California?” 

I mean, “Beautiful Day” and “Vertigo” are big U2 hits.  But I hear those songs in malls or elevators or sporting events, or whathaveyou.  I don’t usually “put them on” when I listen to U2.  But in my better moments, when I can take a step outside myself and really listen to those songs again, I can hear the universal genius in them and appreciate how great they are.

Offline aviastar

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 590
  • Feel like trash...you make me feel clean
Re: Are the hits the best songs?
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2018, 09:26:32 AM »
For U2, mixed bag

Billboard Lists Top 100 Hits as:
  • With or Without You - Yes
  • I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For - Yes
  • Desire - Yes
  • Where the Streets Have No Name - Yes
  • Mysterious Ways - No
  • One - Yes
  • Angel of Harlem - No
  • Beautiful Day - No
  • Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me - No
  • Vertigo - No
  • (Pride) In the Name of Love - Yes
  • Discotheque - No
  • Staring at the Sun - No
  • In God's Country - Good song, but No
  • Even Better Than the Real Thing - Good song, but No

Some of U2's best songs didn't chart as 'hits' in the US: New Years Day, UV (Light My Way), The Unforgettable Fire, and of course... the obscure Acrobat



Offline Tortuga

  • Intellectual Tortoise
  • *
  • Posts: 411
Re: Are the hits the best songs?
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2018, 09:59:33 AM »
WOW!  I agree with all of these posts.  I think generally artists and their management are pretty good at picking out the song that is most likely to get people’s attention and songs that get people’s attention generally have to be good (though often they need to be “lite” to be accessible).  Sometimes the need to keep it accessible means a song that is relatively boring to someone who listens to a lot of music gets chosen over better songs.  But usually “hits” are singles the band has chosen and are pretty good songs.

For me personally, WOWY and NYD are two of the best rock songs EVAH!  WOWY for its lyrics, melody, and unique sound.  NYD for Edge’s rhythm guitar work and the vocals.  It’s no coincidence they were hits.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline SpringStep

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Are the hits the best songs?
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2018, 10:59:16 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Maybe.  I look at it like this:  when I start getting into a band, it’s usually the “hits” that get me into the band, but it’s the deeper tracks that really make me fall in love with them.  It was like this for me and U2.  It was the same thing that happened with other big artists I’d consider to my others favorites throughout my life, such as The Doors, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, David Bowie, Muse, etc., etc., etc.

I remember reading a good analogy about this many years ago.  A lot of people like the Eagles song “Hotel California.”  How many times do you think you’ve heard “Hotel California” throughout your life?  Now how many times have you willingly “put on” on the song “Hotel California?” 

I mean, “Beautiful Day” and “Vertigo” are big U2 hits.  But I hear those songs in malls or elevators or sporting events, or whathaveyou.  I don’t usually “put them on” when I listen to U2.  But in my better moments, when I can take a step outside myself and really listen to those songs again, I can hear the universal genius in them and appreciate how great they are.

There is nothing more true then this post.  The "hits" are what drew me to the band, but once diving into their catalog, I found songs that resonated with trying times in my life with and spoke to me personally.  I remember distinctively, having my iPod on shuffle when Running to Stand Still came on.  Never heard the song before (had the Joshua Tree album on there for the big three), I was enthralled.  That song (along with Stuck in a Moment, which I found shortly after) made me fall in love with them.  And once you explore the "non-hits" you truly find their best work.