Author Topic: How is this legal?  (Read 2361 times)

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Offline JasontheJedi

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How is this legal?
« on: March 08, 2009, 10:07:06 PM »
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Obviously, someone would have to be a complete moron to pay $400 for an upper level seat, but I still don't understand how a third party already has tickets to sell. Why are they legally allowed to sell "sold out" tickets to a show that hasn't even gone on sell yet and how did they get the tickets? Maybe this is just all crap, but if Live Nation or Ticketmaster or whoever is in charge of selling tickets allows these other sites to get tickets ahead of time, it's no wonder I wasn't able to get tickets to the Vertigo Tour through Ticketmaster last time around.

Since I'm ignorant on these sort of things, could someone please enlighten me? Thanks.



streetmission

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2009, 10:11:49 PM »
It's not legal.  Trust me, those tickets don't exist.  U2 hasn't even officially announced dates yet (or even the tour itself, for that matter).  This is just a scam; they've taken the one North American date that was mentioned in the Billboard article and are offering nonexistent tickets to that show.

Offline beershack

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2009, 10:30:24 PM »
There's nothing "illegal" about it.  Its just a broker taking pre-orders for the concert.  Happens every day for every tour.  I guarantee that if you call them they wont claim to have anything in hand.

andyt

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2009, 05:11:51 AM »
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Obviously, someone would have to be a complete moron to pay $400 for an upper level seat, but I still don't understand how a third party already has tickets to sell. Why are they legally allowed to sell "sold out" tickets to a show that hasn't even gone on sell yet and how did they get the tickets? Maybe this is just all crap, but if Live Nation or Ticketmaster or whoever is in charge of selling tickets allows these other sites to get tickets ahead of time, it's no wonder I wasn't able to get tickets to the Vertigo Tour through Ticketmaster last time around.

Since I'm ignorant on these sort of things, could someone please enlighten me? Thanks.

These scum bags charge money like that as they prey on fans fears that they won't be able to get a ticket when the tickets go on sale to the public.

Don't bother with it - you're much better off buying tickets on e bay nearer the concert date if you can't get one when they go on sale.

Prices are always very high as soon as gigs sell out and come down a lot nearer the concert date.

i hate ticket agencies - they are all w**kers. In fact, I hate anyone who buys tickets to sell them at a profit and has no intention of going to the gig.

Offline JasontheJedi

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2009, 07:25:39 AM »
Don't worry, I wasn't going to bother with them. I just can't believe they can get away with it legally.

Offline SaintMike

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2009, 07:29:40 AM »
How is this any different than somebody selling oil futures?  Tickets are the purest form of capitalism - the demand is pure and determined by the fans' interest in a show or concert.  Anti capitalist bands like Pearl Jam and Rage have tried to break this, but you really can't break capitalism - you can only suppress it ineffectively for a period of time.

U2 are the ones who are forcing this stuff by holding back their 2nd dates until sellouts are confirmed.  They're equally to blame IMO.

I'm going to use my U2.com membership to buy tickets to the Chicago show and scalp them so I can pay for my airfare and hotel to see them in Tampa or Houston or wherever I decide is easiest to fly to and see them.  Sorry, but that's what I gotta do to subsidize my trip.  It's not my fault they constantly ignore New Orleans.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 07:31:51 AM by SaintMike »

andyt

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2009, 07:32:21 AM »
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How is this any different than somebody selling oil futures?  Tickets are the purest form of capitalism - the demand is pure and determined by the fans' interest in a show or concert.  Anti capitalist bands like Pearl Jam and Rage have tried to break this, but you really can't break capitalism - you can only suppress it ineffectively for a period of time.

It's not different but it doesn't make it right, does it?

There must be fairer ways of doing this and ones that don't involve lining the pockets of fat, bloated rich people.

Offline SaintMike

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2009, 07:38:54 AM »
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How is this any different than somebody selling oil futures?  Tickets are the purest form of capitalism - the demand is pure and determined by the fans' interest in a show or concert.  Anti capitalist bands like Pearl Jam and Rage have tried to break this, but you really can't break capitalism - you can only suppress it ineffectively for a period of time.

It's not different but it doesn't make it right, does it?

There must be fairer ways of doing this and ones that don't involve lining the pockets of fat, bloated rich people.

I guarantee you the guys who own those ticket websites aren't rich.  In fact, they're probably struggling middle class with kids and a mortgage and a crappy marriage

You don't see or hear about all the times that brokers have to give away tickets to events like Oklahoma City Thunder at New York Knicks that nobody wants to go see.  You only hear about events like Cleveland Cavaliers at New York Knicks or U2 at the Meadowlands.

Scalpers/Brokers can be a great hookup for tickets under face value to games that don't have demand.  These guys are probably losing money hand over fist on Knicks season tickets, etc.  But they have to keep buying them and losing money on the hopes that one day LeBron James will sign with the Knicks.  The fans win in such situations.  It works both ways. 

andyt

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2009, 08:02:51 AM »
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How is this any different than somebody selling oil futures?  Tickets are the purest form of capitalism - the demand is pure and determined by the fans' interest in a show or concert.  Anti capitalist bands like Pearl Jam and Rage have tried to break this, but you really can't break capitalism - you can only suppress it ineffectively for a period of time.

It's not different but it doesn't make it right, does it?

There must be fairer ways of doing this and ones that don't involve lining the pockets of fat, bloated rich people.

I guarantee you the guys who own those ticket websites aren't rich.  In fact, they're probably struggling middle class with kids and a mortgage and a crappy marriage

You don't see or hear about all the times that brokers have to give away tickets to events like Oklahoma City Thunder at New York Knicks that nobody wants to go see.  You only hear about events like Cleveland Cavaliers at New York Knicks or U2 at the Meadowlands.

Scalpers/Brokers can be a great hookup for tickets under face value to games that don't have demand.  These guys are probably losing money hand over fist on Knicks season tickets, etc.  But they have to keep buying them and losing money on the hopes that one day LeBron James will sign with the Knicks.  The fans win in such situations.  It works both ways. 

I couldn't care less if they're middle class with a crappy marriage. Most middle class people aren't poor which is why they're middle class. And since when has having a crap marriage got anything to do with being a tosser - or maybe it has a lot to do with it.

The simple fact is, when tickets for gigs go on sale, ticket agencies, scalpers and also 'real' U2 fans buy them, not because they want to go, but because they want to sell them on to other people at vastly inflated prices. Everyone is at it, everyone is greedy.

Most people I know will buy the maximum amount of tickets for a show (usually 4) even if only 2 of them are going. They then sell the tickets for as much money as humanly possible. If I ever have a ticket spare for a gig, I sell it for what I paid for it - no question.

It's a symptom of the rubbish society we live in. People who think they're clever call it a 'free market'. Still doesn't make it right.

Offline SaintMike

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2009, 08:28:18 AM »
U2 (sponsored by Blackberry) is just as guilty/greedy as the scalpers, dude.  At least scalpers pay their taxes in their home country.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 08:33:25 AM by SaintMike »

andyt

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Re: How is this legal?
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2009, 08:33:41 AM »
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U2 (sponsored by Blackberry) is just as guilty/greedy as the scalpers, dude.  At least scalpers pay their taxes in their home country.

/OH SNAP!

Excellent - that was quite funny!

Yeah, I know what you mean. Don't get me wrong, I dislike U2 and their business practices as much as scalpers. It's all greed.