@U2 Forum

U2 => The Music and Lyrics => Topic started by: ShankAsu on October 08, 2017, 02:10:10 AM

Title: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: ShankAsu on October 08, 2017, 02:10:10 AM
I've been an active member for a few years now and I see that there are a lot of long time fans and then a few very active very young fans. Being 37 myself I feel like I missed out being a fan at the time when JT came out and then the musical transition that occurred with AB. I'm curious what it is to the younger fans that draws them to the band now. Is it because the heard the older stuff first or did they listen to the new stuff and then discover the older songs, or what? Pop was the first album that was a new release for me but I was already a huge by that point, due mostly to WOWOY and JT, AB and Zoorooa. Wookiee and WhenIsSOE, I'm looking at you two...
Title: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: DoYouFeelLoved on October 08, 2017, 04:49:48 AM
I am in my late twenties and became a fan when I was 16, so I have missed all of their greatest moments.

To answer your question, it all started with Beautiful Day and ATYCLB for me. It had already been my favorite song since childhood when it first came out, but when I finally heard the album I was instantly hooked.
Then after listening to Bomb, which was huge at the time, I went back to discover all of the old records.

Having grown up in the 90's surrounded by the great european electronic and dance scenes, I was blown away by Pop and it became a favorite of mine straight away.

Hope this satisfy your curiosity, I guess most young twenty/thirty something fans have followed a similar path as mine.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Smee on October 08, 2017, 07:59:34 AM
I too have found myself curious as to why "younger" fans would be drawn to the band these days. Im guessing most are getting into the band coz of the modern day releases, as id be genuinely suprised if it was the older albums (pre 90s) that got this section of fans hooked. I just think you had to be about at the time, for the albums to make any sort of sense. I could be wrong tho
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: tom_b1807 on October 08, 2017, 09:06:41 AM
I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: wlomaco on October 08, 2017, 11:21:16 AM
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I am in my late twenties and became a fan when I was 16, so I have missed all of their greatest moments.

To answer your question, it all started with Beautiful Day and ATYCLB for me. It had already been my favorite song since childhood when it first came out, but when I finally heard the album I was instantly hooked.
Then after listening to Bomb, which was huge at the time, I went back to discover all of the old records.

Having grown up in the 90's surrounded by the great european electronic and dance scenes, I was blown away by Pop and it became a favorite of mine straight away.

Hope this satisfy your curiosity, I guess most young twenty/thirty something fans have followed a similar path as mine.

My niece and her husband are 32 and 34.  They both got hooked by Beautiful Day.  I think that's when it started for those "young ones."  It's like there were two phases of fans, those of us who got hooked in the 80's with the original stuff, and then another wave of fans that are 20-25 younger than the rest of us.  And, I have to say, having seen them in concert 6 times since 2004, I feel like the crowd has gotten increasingly younger.  Or at least young kids are somewhat represented.  Especially in GA.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: mdewater on October 08, 2017, 12:15:42 PM
I wouldnít say Iím a ďveryĒ young fan at 27, but I discovered U2 at 14 years old thanks to How To Dismantle An Atomic Bomb. The iPod campaign got me. Fell in love with the sound of City of Blinding Lights, then the album as a whole, and then started further exploring their catalog. Beautiful Day was a song I knew of but hadnít paid a whole lot of attention to, and a few other hits were songs I knew and liked, but didnít know they were U2. Took a deep dive into their full catalog and the rest is history!
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: PopMofo97 on October 08, 2017, 01:40:57 PM
I'm 41 and I'm a fan from Achtung Baby. I missed the era of Joshua Tree, but next years were mine :)
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Racingfan53 on October 08, 2017, 01:59:48 PM
Hello, maybe I can help as a high-schooled teenage (girl!) fan of U2!

For me it was originally Joshua Tree.  I slowly grew to absolutely love the Big Three from JT--WOWY, Still haven't Found What I'm Looking For, and Streets.  I then started listening to the albums in full, and as I write this, I'm listening to TUF (my favorite U2 song, to be honest.)  It took me a while to appreciate War, Boy and October, and I'm still not the biggest fan of POP and Zooropa, but most of the other albums were immediate love.

I'm a person who really does not have a "musical taste" as it is conventionally known.  I love music across all genres, as long as I consider it great music.  So the draw for me, personally, is U2's depth and timeless greatness.  The lyrics, masterful orchestration of the songs, and legacy is what I love.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Sonofabono on October 08, 2017, 02:02:17 PM
I'm 26. I didn't become a fan until around 2002. HTDAAB was the first album that came out while I was a fan. I know HTDAAB isn't everybody's favorite record, but it grabbed me. I haven't let go since.

Looking back, I think what attracted to me U2 was their U2-ish ness. Again, HTDAAB isn't everybody's favorite record, but it is unmistakably a U2 record. Nobody else writes songs like Miracle Drug and COBL.

Turning the corner to whether or not more younger fans will come on board, though I like YTBTAM, it has me worried about the contents of the new record cause it's not obviously U2ish. Maybe some people will like that, but, it has me worried. U2 is at their best when they're being U2. That doesn't mean writing recycled versions of Streets over and over again. You can hear the U2ishness in War and JT and AB and Zooropa, all very different albums. U2 being U2 involves some level of transcendence. I don't know if YTBTAM has it.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: monopoly on October 08, 2017, 03:40:19 PM
I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: DK46 on October 08, 2017, 03:58:04 PM
I'm 29 and became a fan around mid 2002.  A counselor would play ATYCLB all the time at camp and I was hooked.  I bought the album that summer and listened to it endlessly.  Later that year, I bought the The Best of 1990-2000 album after seeing the Electrical Storm video on VH1 many times.  I've been a fan ever since.  I knew people in high school who were big fans and saw them on the Vertigo Tour.  For whatever reason, I didn't care about live music at the time, so I didn't see them until 360.  I liked HTDAAB well enough at the time, but it's lessened since.  Though my fandom rapidly increased again around NLOTH and I knew some people who were into U2 too.  I went with a good friend to 360 and bought her tickets as a b-day present.   

All that said, I have maybe one or two friends who really likes them as much.  It's odd, but despite being one of the biggest bands ever, they're sort of a band for me as not many (if any) people I know really listen to them.  Does that make sense?  I'm okay with that, but sure...they get some ridiculous flak from younger people. 

I saw some younger people at TJT2017, so I dunno.  Perhaps it's parents taking their kids.  But yeah, I don't see Songs of Experience bringing in swaths of new fans, but whatever, that ship has sailed.  I guess I was lucky to get into them when I did, but they were still pretty popular from 2000 to 2005.  Perhaps when they finally break up, people will reevaluate them and they'll become the biggest thing ever again, if for a limited time. 
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: TheOriginal on October 08, 2017, 09:20:53 PM
I'm a fan in my late teens, and I first got into them when Bomb was out. My dad was a casual fan, so I loved Vertigo and COBL. From there, I didn't love them until I went back and started listening to ALTYCLB. I also loved the Live in Chicago, Live in Boston and Go Home concerts. From there, I got into TJT, and then their transition into AB (which is my favourite album). I started listening to AB and got really interested in what drove them from TJT to AB. I was pretty much hooked after that, and now I know basically their whole catalogue (exluding maybe Boy and October). So to sum up, I was hooked by ALTYCLB and Bomb, but I love them because of TJT and AB.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: tommyboy6913 on October 08, 2017, 11:34:48 PM
I saw a lot of people when I saw them in Dallas back in May of this year. I saw people that were in their 20's and 30's. I also saw some really young fans that were probably with their parents and a couple of older people. It was a good mix of young and old and it was quite diverse...Asian, Indian, Hispanic, White and some African-Americans...It was nice to see such diversity at the U2 show in Dallas.
Title: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: DoYouFeelLoved on October 09, 2017, 03:42:00 AM
At the London shows of I+E I remember seeing lots of twenty something and teenagers. It's hard to tell if it's in any way indicative of a growing young following, cause in Turin the month before there were none, mostly people in their fourthies and onward.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: the_chief on October 09, 2017, 06:14:55 AM
Hold Me Thrill Me Kiss Me.

Also, Pride for some reason and the bass line in New Year's Day.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: WookieeWarrior10 on October 09, 2017, 07:19:51 AM
U2 was in regular rotation in the car as a younger child. My mom primarily played ATYCLB and HTDAAB (coincidentally my two least favorite U2 albums!), which fueled my embryonic fandom at the ripe age of...  maybe seven? Possibly a tad older.

For the longest time my enjoyment of the band never extended past that, and eventually I forgot about them for a while. Then SOI dropped in 2014, which coaxed me to delve into U2's full discography. Shortly thereafter, I joined this forum after a few short months of true fandom.

Oddly enough, I'm one of the only younger fans that have grown to despise the band's newer material.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: julez728 on October 09, 2017, 08:52:56 AM
My best friend introduced me to their music in the early 90s just after AB was released...I was about 12 at the time.  I just remember being intrigued and I wanted to hear more.  I acquired their back catalog over time with the help of my brother.

I still enjoy their music and am glad they are still putting out new material and are having fun doing so.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Racingfan53 on October 09, 2017, 07:32:26 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: monopoly on October 09, 2017, 08:40:15 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: ricebird5678 on October 09, 2017, 08:51:04 PM
I, myself, would what would be considered a 'young' fan. I am 23 years old and I can vividly remember riding in my late grandfather's pick-up truck to the store after a long day in the fields. I'd say I was 16 at the time. He was a spiritual man, and he had a burned CD, and his favorite song was "40." Thus, I was introduced to U2 thanks to David if you will.

As a few years passed on, and my awareness of the 'good music' increased, I realized how innovative U2 was and fell in love with their sounds, lyric, and passion for their profession. I will admit I would have paid an arm and a leg to be at Slane Castle or in Sydney for ZOOTV. That U2 has come and gone, but the legend lives on.

I have seen the band in concert once, at the Bonnaroo music festival this past summer. I was in a group of 40+ and I convinced a few of them to check out U2 with me. Waited for ten hours to get as close to the front as possible, and needless to say, they are hooked on the band as I am.

I think with my generation, U2 can not connect. The bubble gum music of today is so shallow that we don't tend to search for music with meaning. I just hope U2 does not continue their recent trend of trying to conform to today's norms. The Blackout is a very fresh song and a return to form in my opinion.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Luzita on October 09, 2017, 08:58:10 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Smee on October 10, 2017, 07:50:38 AM
Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?
Title: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: DoYouFeelLoved on October 10, 2017, 08:08:02 AM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?
For me, I do love 80's U2, but it's mostly the early days up until TUF.
I like TJT but, for some reason, I've always had a hard time relating with the aesthetics and live performances of the 87-90 period.
I don't like the way they were presenting themselves and I don't like the way the songs were being played live.
I don't think I've ever watched a full show of that era in eleven years of my fandom.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Smee on October 10, 2017, 08:54:51 AM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?
For me, I do love 80's U2, but it's mostly the early days up until TUF.
I like TJT but, for some reason, I've always had a hard time relating with the aesthetics and live performances of the 87-90 period.
I don't like the way they were presenting themselves and I don't like the way the songs were being played live.
I don't think I've ever watched a full show of that era in eleven years of my fandom.
Im the polar opposite. I adored the live performances back then. Bonos vocal was on point (even tho he was likely wrecking his voice). Give a live performance of any tune back then, over its modern day version
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: evaboogaard on October 10, 2017, 09:22:24 AM
I'm 18, my dad introduced NLOTH (the album) to me when it came out, and i actually loved it. I started getting into all of their old stuff about 2 years ago, though. For me it started with ATYCLB, NLOTH and eventually SOI. I didn't even listen to the Joshua Tree, lmao.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: WhenIsSOE on October 10, 2017, 09:23:11 AM
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Hold Me Thrill Me Kiss Me.

Also, Pride for some reason and the bass line in New Year's Day.
All of it.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: codeguy on October 10, 2017, 11:59:23 AM
45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: WookieeWarrior10 on October 10, 2017, 04:37:17 PM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: riffraff on October 10, 2017, 04:45:22 PM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: WookieeWarrior10 on October 10, 2017, 04:47:27 PM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?

I could definitely jam out to some Hawkmoon in your company, Riff! Here's to hoping you draw it at your next show!
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: riffraff on October 10, 2017, 04:48:26 PM
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Really interesting to hear some younger fans take on things.

One thing id like to know and i guess this would be aimed at fans who got into u2 latterly. My question would be, what do you make of the 80s u2? The albums mainly?

Boy is a solid album, and even more impressive debut. Out of Control, Electric Co.,

October is largely unoffensive to me; nothing tremendous about it. I have never actually given this album a complete listen from start to finish (I have heard all of the tracks, of course, just not in a continuous run-through).

I have never understood the love that War garners... there are some very poor efforts on this album (Red Light and The Refugee immediately spring to mind). Like October, this record has not aged favorably

The Unforgettable Fire is easily my favorite U2 album of this decade. U2 demonstrate an expert ability in crafting beautiful soundscapes and experimenting with abnormal song structure. Pride is the only song on here that I dislike.

I think that my opinions on The Joshua Tree are pretty well documented on the forum. TJT is a middle-of-the-road album that has a few great songs on it (Exit, MOTD, RTSS, BTBS, WOWY), but is weighed-down by several clunkers (RHMT, ISHFWILF, TTYW).

Rattle & Hum would be my least favorite album from this decade. From the few studio tracks that reside here, I only really enjoy God Part II and Heartland.
Wook...what about my Hawkmoon? No love for it? Not even just a smidge?

I could definitely jam out to some Hawkmoon in your company, Riff! Here's to hoping you draw it at your next show!
Thanks, dude!
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Racingfan53 on October 10, 2017, 10:16:43 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


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Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: connorfin22 on October 10, 2017, 10:36:23 PM
I am 19 and I have been a fan since I heard Beautiful Day when I was about 3 years old.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: monopoly on October 10, 2017, 10:46:54 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.

Where are you from? Ive noticed there is definitely more of a draw to all ages in smaller cities they performed at. Whether the people in smaller places like KC, indianapolis, boston, etc.  there genuinely like u2 or went because it was something to do....
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Racingfan53 on October 11, 2017, 09:11:50 PM
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I always see some young faces at the concerts. But is there a draw to u2  right now? - no. It's mostly  parents taking their kids. The whole Apple thing was a real damage doer to u2 in the minds of the younger generations. And they're at an age where people are seeing them more of a greatest hits act than making music that's still relevant.

I disagree.  Speaking as, again, a young highschooler into U2's music, I believe there is a draw.  We hear U2 around, we hear of U2, and we are intrigued.  I believe there are great moments on their newer records.  I believe SOI is/was a great draw... one of my best friends was hooked on U2 from SOI.

Some of my best friends are U2 fans.  Some just don't get U2.  Some I have yet to convince to actually listen to their stuff.. a big barrier is that they're considered "old dad rock."  But I know plenty of young people who have gotten into U2 from SOI, Atomic Bomb, and NLOTH... although I personally dislike most of the stuff on NLOTH, I love Atomic Bomb and believe that their newer stuff is not completely different from the older stuff.  It's the same band.

You just restated what I said. U2 in the eyes of the mass public is starting to become greatest hits. You said there's a barrier in which they're classified as "dad rock". Dad rock = irrelevant to the mass of kids.  You and your friends may be fans, but the concerts I went to this summer were kids with parents. I do like the new songs and think it stands with the older material. But there is less of a draw than ever before right now.

Racingfan53, thanks so much for sharing your experience as an actual teenage U2 fan. Sometimes us older fans try to guess at how your generation sees U2 but we donít really know. Itís fascinating that, even though the ďdad rockĒ thing may be a barrier, itís not insurmountable.

You said some of your friends got into U2 through SOI. Iím curious ó did any of them get introduced to the album because of the iTunes giveaway?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Sorry, monopoly, I somewhat misunderstood what you said.  Among those I know, few of my friends and peers actually were introduced to U2 and other old bands/artists by their parents.  I do have one friend who has been listening to U2 since he was born; in his own words, he "might have been born listening to Streets."

However, as with myself, many of us find U2 from our own research.  I heard U2 on the radio and researched the band long before I found out how huge they were and that my dad was a big fan of the 1980s-era music (especially Boy, October, and War).

Luzita, I do have one friend who was basically introduced to U2 through the iTunes giveaway.  Many people I know listen to the album and are grateful for it being in their library.  I don't have iTunes, so unfortunately I don't have the album (I'd be more disappointed if it were JT or AB, in all honesty).  I'm not going to say the giveaway was necessarily a good move on their part, but it was U2 being U2 -- trying to get themselves out there, pushing the boundaries of musicianship.

One more thing I will add:  Around the time JT17 was performing in my hometown, I knew many people who went.  There are many students at my school, more than I realized before, who went of their own accord, without their parents, and many others who sat outdoors to try and hear the concert (in an outdoor venue, close to a metropolitan area.)  I have found that very young U2 fans are rare, but those around 14 or 15 who are tired of what they perceive (rightly!) to be a lack of good modern music, often resort to researching older music, and find U2.  It's usually very easy for me to introduce those my age to U2, because they're at a stage in their life when they like questioning the status quo, and (interestingly enough) U2 is seen as a buck to the status quo of big modern artists.  They're older, unconventional, and use real artistry.  I find that young people, around my age, are usually very receptive to U2's music.  The issue is more trying to get them to listen in the first place, but me or their other peers giving them personal recommendations seems to be the best way to surmount that barrier.

Where are you from? Ive noticed there is definitely more of a draw to all ages in smaller cities they performed at. Whether the people in smaller places like KC, indianapolis, boston, etc.  there genuinely like u2 or went because it was something to do....

Los Angeles.  I had many friends who were lamenting the fact they couldn't go, but a lot live around the venue where it was performed, so a lot of us hung around outside or went to the park and just tried to listen since we couldn't get tickets.  The lucky few who could told us all about it!
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Perico on October 11, 2017, 09:23:24 PM
Funny story my mom told us yesterday while we were going to the show. She is a fourth grade teacher and told the kids (10 years old) she was going to see U2 tonight. The kids freak out and they say to her "tell them we love them". She is surprised by their reaction so she adds it's a rock band bla bla, and the kids say they thought she mean "youtube" and she was refering to "youtubers", which are unbelievably popular among teens here. So then she wrote the name of the band on the chalkboard to make it clear and one of them said "Oh, yeah, my mom listens to them". It made me lol.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Spacejunk69 on October 12, 2017, 09:24:59 AM
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: The Exile on October 12, 2017, 02:45:31 PM
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Spacejunk69 on October 12, 2017, 03:06:02 PM
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.

LOL - I asked my dad for extra pocket money the week I heard NYD - and at the weekend he drove me into town to buy the album. Over the next month I bought Boy and October.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: tarheelmch on October 12, 2017, 03:14:26 PM
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45 and a fan since I first heard Sunday, Bloody Sunday on Irish radio in 1983. I've been around for all the great moments, and I do feel bad for younger fans who see only an aging colossus with an accident prone singer who keeps putting his foot in his mouth.

1983-1987 were great years to be U2 fans, and the 1991-1995 era too. Rattle and Hum and POP were times when you had to defend them from lots of abuse, but at least they mattered. It was hard not to laugh when the lemon malfunctioned. 2000-2006 were good years too. Great tours, hit-and-miss music but people still cared and U2 were lauded, with superbowl appearances and more grammys than you could shake a stick at. Like it or not, Bono mattered politically and influenced global policy with PEPFAR and Live8/Gleneagles.

Since then, not so much. The music since 2000 continues to be hit or miss, but other than setting records for concert attendance, which is the domain of older acts really, they have not shone for the last decade. Sadly younger fans have to cope with the perception that they're the system - tax-dodging old men who write useless broadway musicals and fall of bicycles.

They once wrote songs like BAD, Bullet the Blue Sky and Acrobat. But they don't know that.

I'll be 49 next year, and echo everything codeguy says here (although I heard NYD before SBS  ;D)

Yep, it was NYD on KROQ that hooked me when I was 10. I made my mom drive me to Licorice Pizza to buy the LP and the rest is history.

LOL - I asked my dad for extra pocket money the week I heard NYD - and at the weekend he drove me into town to buy the album. Over the next month I bought Boy and October.

It was the videos for New Year's Day and, mostly, Sunday Bloody Sunday at Red Rocks that did it for me. MTV played them in heavy rotation back in '84. I bought War and the VHS for Under a Blood Red Sky, and then caught up with October and Boy.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Luzita on October 12, 2017, 03:33:31 PM
Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: WookieeWarrior10 on October 12, 2017, 03:44:47 PM
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Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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I think that those stories have been exhausted... there aren't too many "young" people around here.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: tarheelmch on October 12, 2017, 06:11:47 PM
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Those are great stories but I donít think you guys count as young fans. I want to hear from them. If there are any more. 🤞


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Ha! True.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Racingfan53 on October 12, 2017, 06:22:12 PM
Found another young fan at my school today... my friend who introduced me to U2 originally and I were talking about NLOTH, and one student doing his homework nearby interrupted our conversation to excitedly ask if we were talking about U2.  The conversation was short, but long enough for me to realize that this other guy was definitely a real fan.  He had picked up on us talking about U2 from our discussing the lyrics to Crazy Tonight, acted excited when I mentioned Acrobat being played on the upcoming tour, and said that he knew every U2 album cold except Rattle and Hum.

I think U2 is being swept up by younger fans like myself, but it takes just a bit more effort to connect with an older band and an older fanbase.  But at my school, there are quite a few of us.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: wlomaco on October 12, 2017, 06:45:07 PM
OK, so I'm old.  However, my 19 year old went to the Indy show with me and my husband.  He described the show as "sweet."  He also said that Muse entertained him more, but U2 put on a better performance.  I saw his Snapchat posts and they were very positive.  He plays the bass and NYD and WOWY and BD are on his regular bass-playing rotation.  He has some U2 songs on his spotify playlist.  He loved Joey Ramone (the song).  I believe he will like the new music and I believe he will go see them again.

At age 12, I took him to his first U2 show (360).  My memory is that he looked miserable.  So, much progress has been made.

I doubt he'd be a fan (which he now is) but for hearing me blasting U2 since the day he was born.  But maybe.


Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: trainfanjacob8 on October 13, 2017, 05:10:52 PM
I'm 19, almost 20, and I got into U2 around 2005 (I was about 7 or 8 at the time).  My dad is a huge U2 fan (since 1983 or so) and he got me interested.  I remember I used to watch the Chicago 2005 DVD all the time. I like 1980s/1990s/2000s music so that also has drawn me to the band.  I agree with others that most kids go to U2 shows because they got into U2 from their parents.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Pride on October 13, 2017, 09:40:27 PM
I started getting into them because my dad gave me U218 when I was 3 to watch in the car on long road trips. Maybe you just need to be brought up in an environment where that genre of music is played more often?
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Sunchild on October 16, 2017, 11:08:58 AM
I got into U2 when I was 9 in 1989, thanks to Joshua Tree. I didnt like any of their albums preceding Joshua Tree though, too unfocused for me. However I must say that when I was 10 I was very into Beatles and Rolling Stones, and Stones have been playing for 30 years at that time, and I prefered their newer music when they were older, and other kids from my school have been into Stones as well around the same age. I think if we ourselves at a very young age have been listening to older bands then there's a good chance many young kids are listening to U2 today as well, they are just not as fanatical to be on forums like this, or even having enough ability to write in the first place, or old enough to go to concerts alone, and sometimes parents dont listen to the same things to take them. That might explain to anyone why the age of music performers or any artists has no relevance for children whatsoever, and it is possible more children listen to U2 than adults, one just never finds out. Get them to listen to them, and I'm sure many if not majority will love U2 at this time.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: rlabs19 on December 02, 2017, 07:59:14 PM
22 years old. Got into U2 around the time of SOI because I actually thought it was a cool idea to give the music as a free download on iTunes. Didn't like the album but appreciated the effort.

From there, I got interested in their music. I always knew the hits like the Big 3 from TJT, BD, Elevation, Vertigo, etc. but didn't listen to the albums. My dad recommended The Unforgettable Fire (album) and I immediately fell in love with ASOH, though it took me a bit to get into the album itself. TJT was a natural listen and I fell in love with it. Absolutely love R&H and thought the DVD was awesome.

Then I just started listening to everything I could get my hands on.

That said, I'm not in the younger generation of U2 fans that thinks HTDAAB deserved 9 Grammy's or that BD is their best song. Give me Mothers of the Disappeared any day over 3/4 of what they've written in the 21st century.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Clarky on December 02, 2017, 08:46:27 PM
^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: kinsella on December 02, 2017, 11:12:52 PM
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^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.

Err....quick but obvious question here - if you got ATYCLB for Christmas in 2000 and became U2 obsessed thereafter, how the hell did it take two years for your first listen to Achtung Baby?
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Clarky on December 03, 2017, 12:16:07 AM
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^Awesome. Interesting thread.

As a 31 year old male I consider myself a young U2 fan, though I'm getting a bit too old now to label myself as young anymore, especially when I read about 19 and 20 year old fans on here. Yikes.

I remember hearing Hold Me Thrill Me back in 95 with the Batman Forever movie (big batman fan as a kid) and thinking it was the coolest song ever (still do actually). I was a passive fan in my early teenager years for about 5 years until ATYCLB came out and my family got it for me for Christmas. So from 2000 on I became U2 obsessed. I spent most of the first half of the 2000's going back through U2's catalogue and listening to all their stuff. Those were formative years for me. Probably heard AB for the first time the whole way through on Christmas Day in 2002. That was special.

Err....quick but obvious question here - if you got ATYCLB for Christmas in 2000 and became U2 obsessed thereafter, how the hell did it take two years for your first listen to Achtung Baby?

Haha, it seems crazy now but you have to remember that I was only about 14 and I didn't have the luxury of online streaming or downloading music. I certainly wasn't the type of kid who would go out and buy CDs until I was a bit older so I just had to wait for birthdays and Christmas gifts. (MUCH more special that way though, right?) I think sometime in 2003 I had heard everything up until that point. HTDAAB was the first big anticipated release for me.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: SwimmingSorrows on December 03, 2017, 10:51:57 AM
I'm 21, born late 1995.  My dad's a huge fan.  He grew up in Boston, and his grandparents were from Galway.  U2 played a little theater he sometimes played drums at when he was 14 or 15, and somebody snuck him in to see "this cool new band from Ireland."  He's been hooked ever since.  When ATYCLB came out, he played that record a lot in my house.  I liked Elevation when I was 5, apparently, but I didn't really get into the band until much later. 

I vaguely remember hearing the main riff of Crazy Tonight in some commercial and liking it, so I bought that song on iTunes but didn't really like the rest of it very much.  I listened to some of SOI when it was put on my iTunes and thought it was pretty good but still didn't dive into the band.  I know as well that by this point I had heard some of their bigger hits, Sunday Bloody Sunday, With or Without You, I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For.  I also remember Pride coming on in McDonalds or something and my dad saying that that song had changed his life.  I was really struck by that, but I couldn't hear the song itself well enough for it to make an impression.

What finally tipped me over the edge was this video from a YouTuber called Todd in the Shadows where he lists the "top 5 awful moments in U2's Rattle and Hum."  He essentially goes through the movie analyzing what went wrong with it and pointing out some of the more annoying parts.  He does this as a fan of U2, though, and he talks about how it led to Achtung Baby.  He also praises Bono's rant in the live version of Sunday Bloody Sunday.  This is really what got me into them.  I looked up that video and would watch it over and over.  The vocals in that version are still my favorite bits of singing Bono's ever done. 

After that, I took my dad's CD of the Joshua Tree and put it in my car.  It was a week before I stopped just replaying the first 3 songs and actually listened to the rest of it.  I listened to the rest of their material in a pretty random order.  Achtung Baby I listened to for the first time driving to visit a high school friend at his college.  I'd never heard anything from it before, not even One, so that blew me away. 

I know this is now a medium-sized novel, but I feel like I should mention that my younger brother is a fan too.  He's 11, and I write this as Songs of Experience cuts through the walls from his room to mine.  He also loved the Sunday Bloody Sunday rant early on, and I gave him a greatest hits compilation I made to start him off and a couple live albums I edited together later.  (If anyone wants the tracklists for these, just ask). 

One more point for the older fans.  A lot of people here seem to assume the younger fans must have got into U2 through their recent material, but I think that assumes that we listen to music in the same way as older generations did, which isn't really true.  We have the entire history of music at our fingertips, and that means we aren't as stuck in our time as previous generations.  Almost everyone I know loves music both new and old.  Most of us love the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac as well as new bands like twenty one pilots and Walk the Moon.  If we hear a song we like by a band and want to hear more, we can just go find their most beloved album or a greatest hits playlist in seconds.  There are so many ways to get into a band now.  I got a friend into U2 by watching It Might Get Loud, as she liked The White Stripes a lot.  There's a band called Bane's World I found because I was listening to a song on Spotify called You Say by Dori Freeman, and their song You Say I'm in Love was alphabetically next.  There is really no one way that new fans get into U2, as there are now so many ways to do it.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Belisama on December 03, 2017, 11:53:16 AM
^ Thank you for that post, in particular the last paragraph.  You bring up an excellent point. 

As a kid I was subject to the music my parents played on their record player.  For some reason they were really hung up on The Platters and The Ray Conniff Singers. Plus what ever they were cranking up on their super cool 8 track in the car.  Most of the music I liked as a teen came from whatever I heard on the radio. .  if you didn't like the genre of a particular station, you might miss some amazing artists.  That was just the way of it.

Now music is so much more accessible (not just in an intellectual way).  Few things give me as much pleasure as an "older" fan than to be able to discuss U2 with fans of all ages, but in particular I learn from the younger fans who are also kind enough to share their favorite artists with me. 
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: EnduringChill on December 03, 2017, 01:00:50 PM
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One more point for the older fans.  A lot of people here seem to assume the younger fans must have got into U2 through their recent material, but I think that assumes that we listen to music in the same way as older generations did, which isn't really true.  We have the entire history of music at our fingertips, and that means we aren't as stuck in our time as previous generations.  Almost everyone I know loves music both new and old.  Most of us love the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac as well as new bands like twenty one pilots and Walk the Moon.  If we hear a song we like by a band and want to hear more, we can just go find their most beloved album or a greatest hits playlist in seconds.  There are so many ways to get into a band now.  I got a friend into U2 by watching It Might Get Loud, as she liked The White Stripes a lot.  There's a band called Bane's World I found because I was listening to a song on Spotify called You Say by Dori Freeman, and their song You Say I'm in Love was alphabetically next.  There is really no one way that new fans get into U2, as there are now so many ways to do it.
I love this point you make here. Younger listeners don't need to be exposed to U2's current music to discover them- so much of their older releases are now instantly available online. I'm 21 and was introduced to U2 through my father playing The Joshua Tree on CD, but after becoming interested in them, I listened to most of their albums subsequently on YouTube, whatever songs I could find. For a while after I joined this forum, I thought that was a rarity- it seemed like most fans had bought their albums as they came out, or just bought the albums in general, rather than listening to (mostly) everything for free as I did. And it's the same with other bands, as you mentioned! If I hear a band or artist mentioned somewhere and I feel they might be worth checking out, I look their name up on YouTube and watch whatever videos they have to see what they're like. (I guess a lot of people use Spotify for this but I've never really liked using Spotify.)

Not sure what it is that appeals to me about then, or rather I'm not sure if it's any different from what older fans like about them. I like their melodies and lyrics and the personalities of the band members. I don't know if age has much to do with it.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Clarky on December 03, 2017, 04:51:47 PM
Great post SwimmingSorrows
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Allhorizonbomb on December 05, 2017, 10:38:07 PM
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Allhorizonbomb on December 05, 2017, 10:42:48 PM
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.

I will also have to say I'm in the extreme minority in that my parents did not introduce U2 to me. I found them on my own on the radio one day with I'll Go Crazy If I don't Go Crazy tonight.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Belisama on December 06, 2017, 02:52:27 AM
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.


I am a firm believer that there is a U2 for all tastes.  Curious. . . what draws you to No Line?  I too probably like No Line more than most fans.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Allhorizonbomb on December 06, 2017, 12:27:36 PM
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I myself am 19, and I'd say I've considered myself a 'fan' for a few years now, although I can safely say I am in the minority there with my age group. My dad has always been quite a casual fan and you could say that I grew up with the band a little bit but it's only been recently where I've taken an active interest in them. I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him) So I guess like any of the older fans here I was just drawn to the tons of quality music this band, because whilst the music is becoming older and older the one thing that stays the same is the magic of the output this band have made over the many years. Probably the moment that turned me into a fan 100% was watching the Slane castle DVD, and it was really that that turned me onto them as a fan and I have seen them twice on I&E and on TJT2017 tour, with my dad, which both incredibly experienced. So in summary I would just say through a mixture of listening to them intermittently when I was younger and just having an 'older' taste in music generally is what draws me to the band. And while I'm at it I just want to add that I hope all you older fans realise how lucky you are to have been alive when Zoo TV, Elevation tour etc were around, I think I would chop off a limb to be able to take a time machine back to one of those concerts, as great as the concerts I have seen were!

I completely agree with that last statement. I'm 20 years old though and my overly fandom starts and ends with No Line on the Horizon. The first album I ever actually could enjoy I would not be a fan of the band if it was not for No Line and the 360 tour. It makes me very sad that they've completely given up on that record.


I am a firm believer that there is a U2 for all tastes.  Curious. . . what draws you to No Line?  I too probably like No Line more than most fans.

I love the style of the album. It it just sounds so different from everything else, but familiar. I could deal without Get on Your Boots though.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: jjack339 on December 07, 2017, 12:36:50 PM
32 here. Got hooked on the band in college. Always liked the biggest hits Pride, WoWY, Streets, ISHNFWILF, and One. I had a friend who was a diehard U2 fan and he burned let me burn Joshua Tree and October. Loved those albums. Then a short while later HTDAAB came out and I bought it 1st week on CD. I think at this point I became a U2 "fan" because over the next year I bought U2 albums 1 at a time when I could find them (some of the older ones were hard to find, best buy is where I finally found Boy).
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: jonnydeaf on December 07, 2017, 12:50:10 PM
I'll speak for my early teen daughter.

She heard U2 frequently in the house growing up, and when SoI came out, she heard it constantly.  She really liked Miracle, Every Breaking Wave, and California is her favorite.  For one of her piano recitals, she played Angel of Harlem, one of her favorites.  We took her to the I/E concert last time around the JT tour last summer.  She frequently wears the t-shirts (and I've bought the next sizes already so she'll keep wearing them).  She also likes Weezer, Coldplay, and Bruno Mars - among others in the Pop/Rock genre.  Coldplay and U2 are the same type of act for her Beatles and Stones as it was in the 60s.  She has to be reminded that Coldplay came 2nd, so when she says, "This sounds like a Coldplay song..." I have to reminder her u2 came first...until this record.

This record sounds like the greatest Coldplay album ever. I don't mean that as a slight.  I mean that as, U2 still makes better albums than their contemporaries in the Pop/Rock genre.  For my daughter, that's her wheelhouse. 

Of course, she doesn't understand why certain lyrics mean certain things. And some topics make the songs both intriguing and frightening (Raised by Wolves, SBS) for example. 

Personally, to see her go to school each day in a "I Want to Run/I Want to Hide" t-shirt gives me a good feeling.  And as much as I could trade "Streets" for another song this tour, I won't mind if she enjoys it this summer. 
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Argo on December 08, 2017, 02:51:36 AM
This is a really great thread. Really interesting to read the comments made by younger fans. As a 40+ year old, I guess the comparison is something like the Stones 20 years ago. One way or another I heard various Stones songs whether it be in movies, covers and so on and sometimes that would make me look into more of their music to see what else was good. At the end of the day, good music is good music and it comes down to whether the individual is happy enough with the music of the present or interested enough to explore more of the past.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: zeeTV on December 08, 2017, 05:02:15 AM
Basically born into a U2 fam, so could never escape it. And glad I didn't
they make me so full, they give me something that no one else today can
and I love things that are uncool to our gen, ;)
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: TongueInMyEar on December 08, 2017, 08:58:37 AM
30 years old so not exactly a young fan. But anyway.....

Got into U2 initially around 98/99, my brother had the 1980-1990 best of and played it a lot, and I started really enjoying certain songs from it (Streets and Bad mostly).

Then 2000 when ATYCLB came out and Beautiful Day was played everywhere my interest grew. My brother started buying some older albums, I remember in particular him coming home with AB and Pop.

13 year old me decided to start with Pop, because it had a cool bright cover and the title suggested I might like it more. I did enjoy it but didn't set the world on fire.

Then I decided to give the one with the weird German word a go. AB was the first time I really understood the importance of an album. It's the first album I became obsessive over, and the first time I became obsessive over music in general. It's still in my top 3 albums of all time (probably top 2).

And then I started buying everything of theirs I could, and that's continued to today.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: apoed on December 10, 2017, 07:04:38 PM
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One more point for the older fans.  A lot of people here seem to assume the younger fans must have got into U2 through their recent material, but I think that assumes that we listen to music in the same way as older generations did, which isn't really true.  We have the entire history of music at our fingertips, and that means we aren't as stuck in our time as previous generations.  Almost everyone I know loves music both new and old.  Most of us love the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac as well as new bands like twenty one pilots and Walk the Moon.  If we hear a song we like by a band and want to hear more, we can just go find their most beloved album or a greatest hits playlist in seconds.  There are so many ways to get into a band now.  I got a friend into U2 by watching It Might Get Loud, as she liked The White Stripes a lot.  There's a band called Bane's World I found because I was listening to a song on Spotify called You Say by Dori Freeman, and their song You Say I'm in Love was alphabetically next.  There is really no one way that new fans get into U2, as there are now so many ways to do it.

Good point.  As a 12 year old in 1987, I became aware of U2 through Joshua Tree songs being played on pop radio, and I enjoyed Streets and Still Haven't Found whenever they came on, but I never really became a big fan until a classmate of mine gave me a cassette for the Unforgettable Fire album two years later.  First I heard "A Sort of Homecoming" and thought, "oh, this is interesting", and then "Pride" came on next and I had just discovered my new favorite band (and they have remained in that position for 28 years).  I'm not really sure how I'd never remembered hearing "Pride" before then, but I was only 9 or 10 when it came out, and pop music wasn't on my radar yet, so I'm guessing that's how it seemed new to me 5 years after its release.   
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: scrittoresabino on December 11, 2017, 09:44:56 PM
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30 years old so not exactly a young fan. But anyway.....

Got into U2 initially around 98/99, my brother had the 1980-1990 best of and played it a lot, and I started really enjoying certain songs from it (Streets and Bad mostly).

Then 2000 when ATYCLB came out and Beautiful Day was played everywhere my interest grew. My brother started buying some older albums, I remember in particular him coming home with AB and Pop.

13 year old me decided to start with Pop, because it had a cool bright cover and the title suggested I might like it more. I did enjoy it but didn't set the world on fire.

Then I decided to give the one with the weird German word a go. AB was the first time I really understood the importance of an album. It's the first album I became obsessive over, and the first time I became obsessive over music in general. It's still in my top 3 albums of all time (probably top 2).

And then I started buying everything of theirs I could, and that's continued to today.

Curious, what are the other 2 albums?
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: scrittoresabino on December 11, 2017, 09:51:33 PM
Since at least Vertigo tour, I started noticing Parents bringing their kids to the U2 concerts - Some grade-school, a few looking like high school age. Any time I would see someone in their teens or perhaps earlier 20s it seemed to always be with a parent.

In the I+E tour, there were noticeably quite a few groups of younger people, with no parents in sight. This increased drastically on the TJT2017 tour. Perhaps this was partially due to the venues being so much larger. Still, it appears the ratio was higher than previous tours, and at all of the 3 TJT2017 shows I went, not just one.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: scrittoresabino on December 11, 2017, 10:01:10 PM
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I'll speak for my early teen daughter.

She heard U2 frequently in the house growing up, and when SoI came out, she heard it constantly.  She really liked Miracle, Every Breaking Wave, and California is her favorite.  For one of her piano recitals, she played Angel of Harlem, one of her favorites.  We took her to the I/E concert last time around the JT tour last summer.  She frequently wears the t-shirts (and I've bought the next sizes already so she'll keep wearing them).  She also likes Weezer, Coldplay, and Bruno Mars - among others in the Pop/Rock genre.  Coldplay and U2 are the same type of act for her Beatles and Stones as it was in the 60s.  She has to be reminded that Coldplay came 2nd, so when she says, "This sounds like a Coldplay song..." I have to reminder her u2 came first...until this record.

This record sounds like the greatest Coldplay album ever. I don't mean that as a slight.  I mean that as, U2 still makes better albums than their contemporaries in the Pop/Rock genre.  For my daughter, that's her wheelhouse. 

Of course, she doesn't understand why certain lyrics mean certain things. And some topics make the songs both intriguing and frightening (Raised by Wolves, SBS) for example. 

Personally, to see her go to school each day in a "I Want to Run/I Want to Hide" t-shirt gives me a good feeling.  And as much as I could trade "Streets" for another song this tour, I won't mind if she enjoys it this summer.

When seeing Muse and Arcade Fire (some other bands as well, but them esp) with some younger friends in their earlier to mid 20s, they would comment on certain things the groups did that was so much different and unique from the other artist's they've seen, and how amazing it was. I had to put an asterisk on those moments and advise "these guys learned that from U2". With both bands I've seen them multiple times live, and seen how they grew as performers by leaps and bounds, after touring with U2. Taking from U2, but eventually making it their own. Arcade Fire's most recent tour is really great. So much of it is from PopMart and ZooTV. These younger friends are starting to come around on U2 now.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: TongueInMyEar on December 12, 2017, 04:47:06 AM
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30 years old so not exactly a young fan. But anyway.....

Got into U2 initially around 98/99, my brother had the 1980-1990 best of and played it a lot, and I started really enjoying certain songs from it (Streets and Bad mostly).

Then 2000 when ATYCLB came out and Beautiful Day was played everywhere my interest grew. My brother started buying some older albums, I remember in particular him coming home with AB and Pop.

13 year old me decided to start with Pop, because it had a cool bright cover and the title suggested I might like it more. I did enjoy it but didn't set the world on fire.

Then I decided to give the one with the weird German word a go. AB was the first time I really understood the importance of an album. It's the first album I became obsessive over, and the first time I became obsessive over music in general. It's still in my top 3 albums of all time (probably top 2).

And then I started buying everything of theirs I could, and that's continued to today.

Curious, what are the other 2 albums?

My top 5 are difficult to place, other than saying the top 2 are AB and My Bloody Valentine - Loveless.

Others in the top 5 are Radiohead - In Rainbows and The Bends, and Jesus and Mary Chain - Psychocandy.

Back to U2, I hope eventually they'll again get the credit they deserve, the way bands like Velvet Underground, Pink Floyd do now. Think they're almost damned by the fact they're still going.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: scrittoresabino on December 12, 2017, 06:19:23 PM
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30 years old so not exactly a young fan. But anyway.....

Got into U2 initially around 98/99, my brother had the 1980-1990 best of and played it a lot, and I started really enjoying certain songs from it (Streets and Bad mostly).

Then 2000 when ATYCLB came out and Beautiful Day was played everywhere my interest grew. My brother started buying some older albums, I remember in particular him coming home with AB and Pop.

13 year old me decided to start with Pop, because it had a cool bright cover and the title suggested I might like it more. I did enjoy it but didn't set the world on fire.

Then I decided to give the one with the weird German word a go. AB was the first time I really understood the importance of an album. It's the first album I became obsessive over, and the first time I became obsessive over music in general. It's still in my top 3 albums of all time (probably top 2).

And then I started buying everything of theirs I could, and that's continued to today.

Curious, what are the other 2 albums?

My top 5 are difficult to place, other than saying the top 2 are AB and My Bloody Valentine - Loveless.

Others in the top 5 are Radiohead - In Rainbows and The Bends, and Jesus and Mary Chain - Psychocandy.

Back to U2, I hope eventually they'll again get the credit they deserve, the way bands like Velvet Underground, Pink Floyd do now. Think they're almost damned by the fact they're still going.

The Bends holds up. I still love that album. Also, love much of Psychocandy, but it was Automatic that got me.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: NintendoFan204 on March 24, 2018, 11:48:43 PM


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I'd say generally I'm a fan of 80s and 90s music and early 2000s (coincidentally when U2 were biggest/at the peak) and am generally not a fan of what is considered 'popular' music nowadays with a few exception, like Kendrick Lamar for example (funilly enough it was the U2 collar that got me into him)

I am late to this thread, but I just wanted to say that I got into Kendrick Lamar the exact same way. I grew up on U2 and got really deeply interested in them in early high school (I am 18 atm, 19 in a couple months). I heard about the collaboration with U2 and Kendrick Lamar and my interest was piqued. I listened to the song in the early morning (I woke up at 4 AM. I think I was more excited to hear it then I realized) when Kendrick's album had just come out. I enjoyed the collaboration quite a bit and then listened to his entire album... I ended up listening to that album like crazy throughout the rest of spring! It felt really good to finally find a rap artist who I enjoyed. I had always liked the genre, but only liked specific artists and could never find full albums that I liked. I finally found what I was looking for (unlike JT era Bono). I'm hungry for another good rap album to get into since it has been a year since DAMN. came out and I haven't found anything like it since.
Title: Re: The draw to U2 to younger fans
Post by: Samdoyle1987 on March 31, 2018, 11:17:13 AM
I am perhaps one of the youngest u2 fans on this board, at the ripe age of fifteen. What attracted me to this band was that their music is incredibly emotionally powerful. When I became interested in singing, my dad mentioned that Bono has an amazing singing voice. I did a quick YouTube search, and listened to the hits (still haven't found, with or without you, etc). I couldn't deny the power and emotion of Bono's singing voice. My interest grew from that point, and I realised how powerful this band's music is. Beautiful day is a soaring anthem of joy in the face of sorrow, with or without you is the classic tale of desperation and doomed romance, Sunday bloody Sunday is a furious song of protest and hope. As I made my way through the greatest hits CD (I am Irish, so I think most Irish households have a "u2 1980 - 1990" CD), I was blown away by the quality of the songs. I soon bought the Joshua tree, and listened to it endlessly. I loved the lyrics, they were beautifully poetic and rich in metaphysical imagery that means everything and nothing at the same time. I fell in love with the bands distinctive, multi-textured sound. I sensed that I had discovered something amazing. After Joshua tree, I bought Tuf. I found it hard to get into; the first few times I listened to it I felt that it was missing something, the songs were very atmospheric and not very melodic, something that I had never before experienced in music. After a few listens, I finally "got" it. Tuf became one of my favourite albums.
I don't know anyone my own age who likes u2. I have asked a few of my friends what they think of them, and they just dismiss the band because of their age. I reckon they would like the band if they sat down and listened to Bad, one, until the end of the world, stay, aiwiy and streets. I don't think anyone could deny the power of these songs.