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U2 => General U2 Discussion => Topic started by: Mark_Qiu on October 05, 2018, 08:16:56 AM

Title: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 05, 2018, 08:16:56 AM
I went to the ei Tour in Hamburg on Oct 3rd. I was siting on the 9th line counting from the standing area, right in front of the giant screen. The sound of the concert was to me however sort of too loud, especially the high frequency, which sounded like a huge amount of metal pieces breaking and tearing massively. It was so loud, that the tones of Edgeís guitar and Bonoís vocal were even out of shape, not as beautiful as when they are played in an appropriate loudness. Also, I couldnít hear as clear each part of the band as I could when I listen with my headphone. And the loudness is definitely hearing ability damaging. Every time Edge plays a high note, it feels like a giant knife flying out shearing the audience from the PA. To my surprise the band was acting as if it was all alright, and Edge was jumping and dancing like he was having a good time. Itís hard for me to imagine how the band members could enjoy it when there are like 20 stereos above their heads making exploding sound.

Iíve been a U2 fan since 16-year-old and itís been 6 years. Since I came from China, I never expected to see them unless I go abroad. And now Iím a lucky b****** here in Germany and finally made it to see them. The whole concert was magnificent, brilliant and mad, they played many Achtung Baby songs to dedicate to the Germany Reunion Day, including Zoo Station which is my favorite song. It was dream coming true there, except for one thing, the loudness, or more precisely, the sound effect of the concert...

According to the Equal-Loudness-Contours, people get more sensitive to sound between 1kHz to 5kHz as the sound gets louder from 60dB, that means the audio technician should cut down the high frequency more than other frequencies in a loud concert. Apparently the audio technician didnít do a great job that night. I only came across these problems in small livehouses in my hometown, didnít know it occurs as well in world top rock band live performances... I was expecting a loud, yet clear, comfortable and beautiful sound effect there at U2 concert. Honestly I gotta say, about the sound effect, I am truely disappointed... Whatís going on? Was it an accident at Hamburg that night, or it was originally supposed to be that? I really donít think it is good work from the audio technician who works for the world top class band.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on October 05, 2018, 10:48:27 AM
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I went to the ei Tour in Hamburg on Oct 3rd. I was siting on the 9th line counting from the standing area, right in front of the giant screen. The sound of the concert was to me however sort of too loud, especially the high frequency, which sounded like a huge amount of metal pieces breaking and tearing massively. It was so loud, that the tones of Edgeís guitar and Bonoís vocal were even out of shape, not as beautiful as when they are played in an appropriate loudness. Also, I couldnít hear as clear each part of the band as I could when I listen with my headphone. And the loudness is definitely hearing ability damaging. Every time Edge plays a high note, it feels like a giant knife flying out shearing the audience from the PA. To my surprise the band was acting as if it was all alright, and Edge was jumping and dancing like he was having a good time. Itís hard for me to imagine how the band members could enjoy it when there are like 20 stereos above their heads making exploding sound.

Iíve been a U2 fan since 16-year-old and itís been 6 years. Since I came from China, I never expected to see them unless I go abroad. And now Iím a lucky b****** here in Germany and finally made it to see them. The whole concert was magnificent, brilliant and mad, they played many Achtung Baby songs to dedicate to the Germany Reunion Day, including Zoo Station which is my favorite song. It was dream coming true there, except for one thing, the loudness, or more precisely, the sound effect of the concert...

According to the Equal-Loudness-Contours, people get more sensitive to sound between 1kHz to 5kHz as the sound gets louder from 60dB, that means the audio technician should cut down the high frequency more than other frequencies in a loud concert. Apparently the audio technician didnít do a great job that night. I only came across these problems in small livehouses in my hometown, didnít know it occurs as well in world top rock band live performances... I was expecting a loud, yet clear, comfortable and beautiful sound effect there at U2 concert. Honestly I gotta say, about the sound effect, I am truely disappointed... Whatís going on? Was it an accident at Hamburg that night, or it was originally supposed to be that? I really donít think it is good work from the audio technician who works for the world top class band.


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 YES!  The sound was absolutely ear crushing at my show to the point that it was totally distorted.  Watching that video of Dallas talking about how ďthis guitaristĒ has to re-create his sounds authentically on tour was so ridiculous.  The sound at my show was so bad I could barely tell what song it was.  Honestly, I walked out feeling ripped off because of the sound.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Gavin82 on October 05, 2018, 11:09:29 AM
No & i was @ ACDC in Wembley in 2015 now that was loud my esrs were ringing for days never had that from any of the last 3 U2 tours
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: hollywoodswag on October 05, 2018, 04:45:32 PM
I've had a similar complaint. I was about six people or so back from the B-stage in Tampa at TJT30 and just one person back from the B-stage in DC on this tour, and the sound was so unbelievably loud that most songs sounded like a distorted mess. Not every song was brutal (Vertigo was absolutely spectacular, especially on this tour), but at times like the chorus of The Blackout, it was impossible to distinguish anything.

One recommendation I got here was to use musician's earplugs, which I'll probably do in the future, but I feel like a slight reduction in volume would make the songs much clearer without sacrificing the intensity a good rock concert should have. It's made me tempted to stay towards the back at future shows as a backup in case that helps a bit.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: may2 on October 05, 2018, 06:10:10 PM
I think all concerts are louder than they need be.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Marvinho on October 06, 2018, 12:23:25 AM
The Joshua Tree at Twickenham was so loud I could feel the stadium shaking. Insanely loud. A few folk in the hotel we stayed at afterwards made the same comments.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Smee on October 09, 2018, 06:54:42 AM
I went to see a u2 tribute act, playing to about 100 people in a small venue (capacity about 1100). It was SOOOOO loud it was hurting my ears. The following night, I saw The Rolling Stones, in Murrayfield Stadium, in front of about 60 000 people. The volume was much more bareable

Some of the worst sounding gigs i been to..were u2 gigs! #JustSayin
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: imaginary friend on October 09, 2018, 01:47:28 PM
Yes.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 17, 2018, 05:51:47 PM
When ever you go to a bar, nightclub, and yes definitely a concert, you should have ear plugs with you, preferably musicians ear plugs. I started wearing ear plugs around 2003-2004 to bars, night clubs, and concerts. I got my musicians ear plugs in 2005 and have used them ever since. It improves the sound for you. The band, crew, and venue staff are all wearing hearing protection. You should be as well. Its a rock concert. ROCK CONCERTS ARE LOUD! If you think its louder now or more distorted than it was 5, 10, 15, or 20 years ago, its probably your Ears or hearing issues you might have developed over time rather than the sound mix or sound level. Get your hearing checked with the ear doctor and get them to order you a pair of musicians ear plugs. The ear plugs will be specially designed for your ears. They make mold cast of both your ears and develop your ear plugs based on that. They are a great fit and you can use them for decades.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 17, 2018, 05:58:16 PM
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I went to the ei Tour in Hamburg on Oct 3rd. I was siting on the 9th line counting from the standing area, right in front of the giant screen. The sound of the concert was to me however sort of too loud, especially the high frequency, which sounded like a huge amount of metal pieces breaking and tearing massively. It was so loud, that the tones of Edgeís guitar and Bonoís vocal were even out of shape, not as beautiful as when they are played in an appropriate loudness. Also, I couldnít hear as clear each part of the band as I could when I listen with my headphone. And the loudness is definitely hearing ability damaging. Every time Edge plays a high note, it feels like a giant knife flying out shearing the audience from the PA. To my surprise the band was acting as if it was all alright, and Edge was jumping and dancing like he was having a good time. Itís hard for me to imagine how the band members could enjoy it when there are like 20 stereos above their heads making exploding sound.

Iíve been a U2 fan since 16-year-old and itís been 6 years. Since I came from China, I never expected to see them unless I go abroad. And now Iím a lucky b****** here in Germany and finally made it to see them. The whole concert was magnificent, brilliant and mad, they played many Achtung Baby songs to dedicate to the Germany Reunion Day, including Zoo Station which is my favorite song. It was dream coming true there, except for one thing, the loudness, or more precisely, the sound effect of the concert...

According to the Equal-Loudness-Contours, people get more sensitive to sound between 1kHz to 5kHz as the sound gets louder from 60dB, that means the audio technician should cut down the high frequency more than other frequencies in a loud concert. Apparently the audio technician didnít do a great job that night. I only came across these problems in small livehouses in my hometown, didnít know it occurs as well in world top rock band live performances... I was expecting a loud, yet clear, comfortable and beautiful sound effect there at U2 concert. Honestly I gotta say, about the sound effect, I am truely disappointed... Whatís going on? Was it an accident at Hamburg that night, or it was originally supposed to be that? I really donít think it is good work from the audio technician who works for the world top class band.


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 YES!  The sound was absolutely ear crushing at my show to the point that it was totally distorted.  Watching that video of Dallas talking about how ďthis guitaristĒ has to re-create his sounds authentically on tour was so ridiculous.  The sound at my show was so bad I could barely tell what song it was.  Honestly, I walked out feeling ripped off because of the sound.


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Damn, you never miss a chance to sh** on the band. I suggest getting your hearing checked out and next time wear proper hearing protection like the band, crew, venue staff and informed fans. I started wearing hearing protection in 2003 to bars, nightclubs and all concerts. I wish I started doing that 10 years earlier. Once you feel and hear the value of a good pair of musicians ear plugs, you will never leave home without them.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: JTNash on October 17, 2018, 06:13:16 PM
Iíve worn ear plugs since the 90s try Hearos
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on October 17, 2018, 06:43:53 PM
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I went to the ei Tour in Hamburg on Oct 3rd. I was siting on the 9th line counting from the standing area, right in front of the giant screen. The sound of the concert was to me however sort of too loud, especially the high frequency, which sounded like a huge amount of metal pieces breaking and tearing massively. It was so loud, that the tones of Edgeís guitar and Bonoís vocal were even out of shape, not as beautiful as when they are played in an appropriate loudness. Also, I couldnít hear as clear each part of the band as I could when I listen with my headphone. And the loudness is definitely hearing ability damaging. Every time Edge plays a high note, it feels like a giant knife flying out shearing the audience from the PA. To my surprise the band was acting as if it was all alright, and Edge was jumping and dancing like he was having a good time. Itís hard for me to imagine how the band members could enjoy it when there are like 20 stereos above their heads making exploding sound.

Iíve been a U2 fan since 16-year-old and itís been 6 years. Since I came from China, I never expected to see them unless I go abroad. And now Iím a lucky b****** here in Germany and finally made it to see them. The whole concert was magnificent, brilliant and mad, they played many Achtung Baby songs to dedicate to the Germany Reunion Day, including Zoo Station which is my favorite song. It was dream coming true there, except for one thing, the loudness, or more precisely, the sound effect of the concert...

According to the Equal-Loudness-Contours, people get more sensitive to sound between 1kHz to 5kHz as the sound gets louder from 60dB, that means the audio technician should cut down the high frequency more than other frequencies in a loud concert. Apparently the audio technician didnít do a great job that night. I only came across these problems in small livehouses in my hometown, didnít know it occurs as well in world top rock band live performances... I was expecting a loud, yet clear, comfortable and beautiful sound effect there at U2 concert. Honestly I gotta say, about the sound effect, I am truely disappointed... Whatís going on? Was it an accident at Hamburg that night, or it was originally supposed to be that? I really donít think it is good work from the audio technician who works for the world top class band.


从我的 iPhone 发送,使用 Tapatalk

 YES!  The sound was absolutely ear crushing at my show to the point that it was totally distorted.  Watching that video of Dallas talking about how ďthis guitaristĒ has to re-create his sounds authentically on tour was so ridiculous.  The sound at my show was so bad I could barely tell what song it was.  Honestly, I walked out feeling ripped off because of the sound.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Damn, you never miss a chance to sh** on the band. I suggest getting your hearing checked out and next time wear proper hearing protection like the band, crew, venue staff and informed fans. I started wearing hearing protection in 2003 to bars, nightclubs and all concerts. I wish I started doing that 10 years earlier. Once you feel and hear the value of a good pair of musicians ear plugs, you will never leave home without them.

I always wear earplugs.  And I suggest you look at all my posts, including the ones where I admire the band or disagree with other criticism.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: ME2 on October 18, 2018, 01:42:50 PM
Nearly every concert Iíve been to has been to loud.  Not all though.  Iíve even had my ears ring after Ďacousticí shows.  Obviously not truly acoustic.   Too many concerts and too much exposure to racing especially Formula One has left me with a 30% loss of high frequency hearing.  It ainít coming back.  So take precautions at concerts.  The damage is cumulative.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: UnknownCaller98 on October 18, 2018, 03:51:05 PM
I must say the worst sounding concerts I've seen have been U2. The worst being at the O2 in 2015. Twickenham was bad for the first few songs as well. I wouldn't necessarily say it was too loud. The loudest shows I've seen are in very small venues and my ears ring for about 2 days. Any other band has been fine- but I have found that quieter music (especially Paul Weller with orchestra last Friday at the Royal Festival Hall) gives better sound quality.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Spaderholic on October 19, 2018, 08:58:47 AM
I can't talk about U2 gigs as I've never been to any but from other gigs I've attended over the years I've found nearly all of them far too loud! Ever since I permanently damaged my hearing after a Suede gig in the 90's I wear wax earplugs to every gig. It makes the world of difference, believe me and, for me, they're a necessity as I don't want to lose what hearing I have left, lol!
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: rockatansky on October 19, 2018, 09:23:19 AM
It's a rock 'n roll show folks. It's supposed to be loud.  U2 has to crank up the volume to reach a massive audience. U2 360 tour at the Rose Bowl had over 97,000 people in the audience, many of course way in the back of the stadium.  U2's got to reach them.  That's the beauty of a U2 concert.

I've been attending concerts for over 40 years.  If you're too close, then wear earplugs.  But complaining about a loud U2 rock 'n roll show is ridiculous.  I saw U2 in their 1983 War Tour in a venue with just over 300 people.  The sound was loud but perfect for that venue.  U2 has to adjust sound for the venue and that means reaching everyone.  I say let it rip, the bigger the audience, the louder the better.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 19, 2018, 01:22:42 PM
Folks, what Iím complaining about is mainly not the volume, instead, itís the sound effect. Iíve been to concerts in small and big venues which were also incredibly loud, yet in the same time, not making me uncomfortable. The key to that, imho, is the high frequency. As long as the volume rises up from 60dB, the high frequency sound will be more sensitive compared to other frequency sound to human ears. To make it comfortable to human ears, high frequency must be cut down more as the volume rises.


For example, a song sounds alright when played at 60dB and the equalizer is set to a certain parameter, and if you turn the volume up to, say like 110dB, and leave the equalizer alone, not doing anything about it, ITíS GONNA SOUND BAD! Try it! You will say ďwow that sounds too sharp and hurting!Ē. You gotta work on the equalizer! Such as 1k -5dB, 2k -7dB, 4k -10dB. etc.
The reason why it sounds so bad when songs played loud is that the high frequency is too sharp! Too much hurting! When Edge played the high notes on his guitar, it feels as if heís sticking a knife into my ear! And I was like, man! this is not how I expected to hear!

Yeah, I wish someone told me about this problem before I went to the U2 concert and told me to wear earplugs. That way I would have enjoyed it much better.

But isnít it the audio technicianís job to make sure that the audiences donít suffer from the live music they hear? Or at least signs or notices should be on the tickets or something to tell people to BRING EARPLUGS, because otherwise tonight your hearing ability to high frequency will be to at least a slight degree permanently damaged???
What do I pay two hundred euros for???

The audio technician can really f3ck up a band, and a buch of fans, in just one night.




Loud does not have to mean hurting and uncomfortable. It can be loud, and at the same time, it can be comfortable.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 19, 2018, 01:33:28 PM
Donít tell me to get my ears checked. My ears are good. Iím glad that Iím still sensitive to high pitch sounds. Iím glad that my hearing ability is not so damaged. Protecting fansí hearing ability is every live musicianís duty, for the damage is irreversible, unless they want to hurt their fansí ears, or their audio technician failed his job.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 19, 2018, 01:44:30 PM
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I went to the ei Tour in Hamburg on Oct 3rd. I was siting on the 9th line counting from the standing area, right in front of the giant screen. The sound of the concert was to me however sort of too loud, especially the high frequency, which sounded like a huge amount of metal pieces breaking and tearing massively. It was so loud, that the tones of Edgeís guitar and Bonoís vocal were even out of shape, not as beautiful as when they are played in an appropriate loudness. Also, I couldnít hear as clear each part of the band as I could when I listen with my headphone. And the loudness is definitely hearing ability damaging. Every time Edge plays a high note, it feels like a giant knife flying out shearing the audience from the PA. To my surprise the band was acting as if it was all alright, and Edge was jumping and dancing like he was having a good time. Itís hard for me to imagine how the band members could enjoy it when there are like 20 stereos above their heads making exploding sound.

Iíve been a U2 fan since 16-year-old and itís been 6 years. Since I came from China, I never expected to see them unless I go abroad. And now Iím a lucky b****** here in Germany and finally made it to see them. The whole concert was magnificent, brilliant and mad, they played many Achtung Baby songs to dedicate to the Germany Reunion Day, including Zoo Station which is my favorite song. It was dream coming true there, except for one thing, the loudness, or more precisely, the sound effect of the concert...

According to the Equal-Loudness-Contours, people get more sensitive to sound between 1kHz to 5kHz as the sound gets louder from 60dB, that means the audio technician should cut down the high frequency more than other frequencies in a loud concert. Apparently the audio technician didnít do a great job that night. I only came across these problems in small livehouses in my hometown, didnít know it occurs as well in world top rock band live performances... I was expecting a loud, yet clear, comfortable and beautiful sound effect there at U2 concert. Honestly I gotta say, about the sound effect, I am truely disappointed... Whatís going on? Was it an accident at Hamburg that night, or it was originally supposed to be that? I really donít think it is good work from the audio technician who works for the world top class band.


从我的 iPhone 发送,使用 Tapatalk

 YES!  The sound was absolutely ear crushing at my show to the point that it was totally distorted.  Watching that video of Dallas talking about how ďthis guitaristĒ has to re-create his sounds authentically on tour was so ridiculous.  The sound at my show was so bad I could barely tell what song it was.  Honestly, I walked out feeling ripped off because of the sound.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Damn, you never miss a chance to sh** on the band. I suggest getting your hearing checked out and next time wear proper hearing protection like the band, crew, venue staff and informed fans. I started wearing hearing protection in 2003 to bars, nightclubs and all concerts. I wish I started doing that 10 years earlier. Once you feel and hear the value of a good pair of musicians ear plugs, you will never leave home without them.

I always wear earplugs.  And I suggest you look at all my posts, including the ones where I admire the band or disagree with other criticism.


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What type of earplugs? Make sure they are high quality professional musicians ear plugs. Also get your hearing checked by a professional. Your ears may be the problem rather than Joe O'Herlihy.

I have not read all your post, but they always seem to be negative in some way about the band. Maybe not, but I would guess your post would be in the ratio of 2 to 1 negative over positive.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: 73October on October 20, 2018, 06:04:22 AM
It was a bit distorted in Manchester light night in places - particularly near the beginning.  I was at the back of block 116 (parallel with the I-stage) and the sound made my experience of Lights of Home a bit less enjoyable (this was one of the songs I was really looking forward to hearing).  At times I had a job hearing clearly what Bono was saying down on the e-stage which was further away.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: rockatansky on October 20, 2018, 06:45:07 AM
I suggest that U2's audio technicians are doing everything possible to optimize the sound experience for the people attending the concert.  For a stadium with 97,000 people that is a f****** hard job and I'm sure they do their best.  Admittedly, the last U2 concert I attended was the Elevation Tour.  I was up close and suffered nothing like what is talked about in this thread.  Maybe, things have changed over the many years since then.  U2 has a huge crew who are OBVIOUSLY aware of the issues discussed here.  They are some of the best audio people in the world. U2 is still the biggest rock band in the world.  U2's forte is stadium rock and they excel at it.  Folks WEAR the damn earplugs if you want and then be done with it.  Personally, I've attended concerts large and small over the past 40 years.  And my hearing is stellar. 

I'm sorry that I don't have the technobabble to address other comments here properly. But, I am 100% sure about the fact U2 and their massive support staff know what they are doing.  Anyways, how do you optimize sound for a concert with 97,000 people?  You do you're best technically.  U2 have been at it for 40 years, specializing in stadium rock.  They know what the hell they are doing.

I would love to see U2's audio people discuss equalizers and dB's on this thread.  I'm sure everyone's brains would be spinning with that conversation.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: rockatansky on October 20, 2018, 06:50:24 AM
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I have not read all your post, but they always seem to be negative in some way about the band. Maybe not, but I would guess your post would be in the ratio of 2 to 1 negative over positive.

And how is this relevant to the topic of loud concerts?  Comments like this are the reason I usually avoid any social media.  I thought I'd give this forum a shot but you know what?  It's the same sh** everywhere.  People are so f****** predictable.  Take it to the sandbox.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 20, 2018, 08:10:32 AM
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I have not read all your post, but they always seem to be negative in some way about the band. Maybe not, but I would guess your post would be in the ratio of 2 to 1 negative over positive.

And how is this relevant to the topic of loud concerts?  Comments like this are the reason I usually avoid any social media.  I thought I'd give this forum a shot but you know what?  It's the same sh** everywhere.  People are so f****** predictable.  Take it to the sandbox.

Because there is nothing wrong with the sound or volume of U2 concerts. They don't play any louder than they have before at anytime in their career. So I find the criticism disingenuous and made a comment about the heavy flak U2 receives from one forum member. They responded to that and I responded back. A little off track, maybe. But nothing different than you find in the majority of conversations between humans or in threads on a message board.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: laoghaire on October 20, 2018, 08:22:14 AM
What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 20, 2018, 08:41:45 AM
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I suggest that U2's audio technicians are doing everything possible to optimize the sound experience for the people attending the concert.  For a stadium with 97,000 people that is a f****** hard job and I'm sure they do their best.
 U2 has a huge crew who are OBVIOUSLY aware of the issues discussed here.  They are some of the best audio people in the world. U2 is still the biggest rock band in the world.  U2's forte is stadium rock and they excel at it.
But, I am 100% sure about the fact U2 and their massive support staff know what they are doing.
U2 have been at it for 40 years, specializing in stadium rock.  They know what the hell they are doing.
Yes! Exactly! Thatís what exactly how I thought before I went to that first U2 concert of mine.
I mean, come on, itís U2, they are one the largest bands not just in the world, but also throughout the entire rock ní roll history. They definitely hired the worldís best audio crews and technicians, and they have 40 years of experience, and that makes them without doubt the worldís best.
Yeah, and thatís how I thought before I went. The last thing I thought I needed to worry about when attending a U2 concert, is the live sound not being good. Itíd be ridiculous it if sounded bad.
And oh boy, at the night of the concert, even until the entire concert ended, I still couldnít believe that the hurting exploding sharp sound is what I heard at a U2 concert. I tried and tried to convince myself that ďthere is actually nothing wrongĒ. But I couldnít. It was indeed, shamefully, bad.

The more I expected, the more hurt Iíll be when let down.
And I expected the sound at a U2 concert to be splendid. And I was terribly let down. And Iím desperately looking for an answer, that why it was that? Why would the sound effect be bad at my first U2 concert, which has been my dream for many years since I was a teenager? Otherwise I wouldnít be posting this thread here.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: rockatansky on October 20, 2018, 09:19:27 AM
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I suggest that U2's audio technicians are doing everything possible to optimize the sound experience for the people attending the concert.  For a stadium with 97,000 people that is a f****** hard job and I'm sure they do their best.
 U2 has a huge crew who are OBVIOUSLY aware of the issues discussed here.  They are some of the best audio people in the world. U2 is still the biggest rock band in the world.  U2's forte is stadium rock and they excel at it.
But, I am 100% sure about the fact U2 and their massive support staff know what they are doing.
U2 have been at it for 40 years, specializing in stadium rock.  They know what the hell they are doing.
Yes! Exactly! Thatís what exactly how I thought before I went to that first U2 concert of mine.
I mean, come on, itís U2, they are one the largest bands not just in the world, but also throughout the entire rock ní roll history. They definitely hired the worldís best audio crews and technicians, and they have 40 years of experience, and that makes them without doubt the worldís best.
Yeah, and thatís how I thought before I went. The last thing I thought I needed to worry about when attending a U2 concert, is the live sound not being good. Itíd be ridiculous it if sounded bad.
And oh boy, at the night of the concert, even until the entire concert ended, I still couldnít believe that the hurting exploding sharp sound is what I heard at a U2 concert. I tried and tried to convince myself that ďthere is actually nothing wrongĒ. But I couldnít. It was indeed, shamefully, bad.

The more I expected, the more hurt Iíll be when let down.
And I expected the sound at a U2 concert to be splendid. And I was terribly let down. And Iím desperately looking for an answer, that why it was that? Why would the sound effect be bad at my first U2 concert, which has been my dream for many years since I was a teenager? Otherwise I wouldnít be posting this thread here.

I completely understand and that must be very frustrating for you.  You made some very good points in your original post and obviously you have some background in music/audio.  Maybe I overstated what I "feel" U2 has in strengths in the stadium arena.  They might not have the stellar audio crew, they should have or used to have.  Maybe they slacked off, for some reason, in that aspect.  And you are definitely right that you shouldn't have experienced what you did, especially at your first U2 concert.  And I believe the experience you described, that must have been a huge let down.  Wish I had some better answers.  In a way past life, I was an electrical engineer but those days/knowledge are gone.

It's good you are posting here with your experience and the effect it had on you.  I would be severely let down if my first U2 concert was as bad as you experienced.  Try not to let it jade you on the band.  Maybe it was just a bad night for the band and their audio crew.  Wish I had more answers...
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 20, 2018, 10:20:36 AM
If any of you reads German, it's worth checking this out.
https://www.rollingstone.de/u2-live-in-hamburg-ohrenschmerzen-war-das-konzert-zu-laut-1567774/

It's an Article from Rolling Stones, says
"'Ear pain and vertigo':a Twitter user writes, that the visitors had to leave the U2 concert at Barclaycard Arena in Hamburg, even during the show."
"Not only the Twitter user left, but also 'people left rows by rows', and they complained about the ear pain and the vertigo."

Seems like I'm not the only person who had a problem with the sound effect with the U2 concert at Hamburg first night.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 20, 2018, 11:34:00 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: K2 on October 20, 2018, 11:50:01 AM
Usually U2 sound is excellent Ė but sometimes it's not. It may be a case of exactly where you're located in the hall. I was horrified by the loudness and distortion from my seats on the e+i tour in San Jose. I had top price seats  on the side about 20 rows up from the e stage. Singing and speaking were incomprehensible. So frustrating.

At one other concert I was blasted out - Soldier Field, Joshua Tree 30th anniversary. I think it had something to do with being under a balcony (the section above us overhung our section). It was not just overwhelmingly loud, it sounded distorted and out of tune.

Moral of the story: ALWAYS BRING EARPLUGS - high quality (Hearos High Fidelity or better) - you never know when you will need them. Given the price of tickets, it's well worth it.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Mark_Qiu on October 20, 2018, 02:32:52 PM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Gavin82 on October 20, 2018, 02:33:00 PM
Last night was ok my esrs were not ringing like when i seen ACDC @ Wembley in 2015
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: rockatansky on October 21, 2018, 07:33:14 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

Yeah, it's always my fellow 60 year olds that get the blame for everything...   :-[
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 21, 2018, 09:25:58 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

They don't target the sound level to people at certain ages because EVERYONE AGES DIFFERENTLY! So that would be impossible. The fact is, most people had no problems with the show enjoyed it and enjoyed the sound. Those that had problems are in the minority. Its more likely that age related hearing problems explain what they experience since most people in the audience did not. Most people at age 50 will be fine, but there will be a certain percentage that will not be able to take the sound levels or it sounds distorted, not because anything U2 did, but because the decline in hearing that a certain percentage of people experience over time.

Ear plugs, musicians ear plugs can help with this. They reduce the sound level and give you a better mix of what is being played. Buy them and wear them every time you see a band playing live, or go to a night club or anywhere the sound level is as loud as or louder than your lawn mower.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 21, 2018, 09:30:40 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.
People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

Man, this you explained it to perfection!That's why!


Either the band members, the audio crew, or the majority of the audience, are in the age of 40, 50 or even nearly 60. So the live sound effect is targeted to people in their 40s, 50s or even 60s. Therefore the high frequency of the live concerts is set up to more than normal, to adjust and compensate the loss of sensitivity to high frequency of the most audience. Only few of the audience are the age of 20s. And therefore the younger audience there feel the high frequency too sharp, too loud, and too much.

And that perfectly answered my question... thanks, buddy.

Yeah, it's always my fellow 60 year olds that get the blame for everything...   :-[

Well, you can't change what U2 and Joe are doing with the sound, which is most likely the same thing they have done through out their career.  But you can get a hearing check up and also buy a good pair of musicians ear plugs. I don't think U2 and Joe are doing something different or radical with the sound that is suddenly causing fans problems. Its more likely the small percentage of fans who say the sound is bad or too loud are experience age related hearing problems which is normal for a certain percentage of the population. So get the musicians ear plugs. They will allow you to turn down the sound level and will improve the mix for you!
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on October 22, 2018, 01:37:55 PM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear ďprofessional musicians earplugsĒ.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: SwimmingSorrows on October 23, 2018, 12:07:49 AM
No, concerts are loud for a reason.  Only band I saw that I would saw was too loud was Fleetwood Mac, not because my ears hurt but because the sound was distorted on all but the acoustic songs.  I didn't think U2 sounded badly distorted when I saw them, and the shows just wouldn't have as strong an impact without intense volume.  Rock and roll.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 23, 2018, 07:14:14 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear ďprofessional musicians earplugsĒ.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on October 23, 2018, 10:10:41 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear ďprofessional musicians earplugsĒ.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Yeah I get the crowd noise problem.  Iíve experienced that at quieter shows and it is a valid point.

Just let me say.  Iíve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time Iíve had this issue.  My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasnít for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.

You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  Iím sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2ís part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on October 23, 2018, 11:19:11 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear ďprofessional musicians earplugsĒ.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Just let me say.  Iíve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time Iíve had this issue. 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Which is why getting your ears checked would be a good thing. There is always a first time when a person starts to notice their hearing problems.


Quote
My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasnít for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.



I would leave to if I did not have my ear plugs, but that has been my position now for 15 years. Without ear plugs, I don't go to concerts, night clubs, and many bars. I even wear them to mow the lawn. I imagine your wife is about the same age, maybe it would be good to have a hearing check up as well. I get a check up every two years, primarily to clean the wax build up always caused by using ear plugs in so many different situations.

 An isolated postion in the venue where the sound is bad is possible. But that was much more likely in the early days than now given the technology.


Quote
You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  Iím sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2ís part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


              I like lots of bands but I don't post on message boards for bands that I feel have albums that are less than stellar and or disappointing shows. I don't have time to do that. There is a personality trait out where people tend to only comment when they have something negative to say. As BONO said, remember what bathroom walls used to look like before the internet?

              I'm much more in the group of, if you have nothing nice to say, don't say anything at all. This is a U2 FAN FORUM. It should not be a surprise to anyone that there are forum members who will defend the band on any issue.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on October 23, 2018, 11:39:05 AM
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What is your evidence that there is nothing wrong? If it's just your experience, how does your experience trump others'?

Sound varies widely by location in the arena, not to mention by performance (otherwise they wouldn't need to do sound checks every time).

It sounded ok to me in my seat on my date but I'm not going to dismiss a thread full of people who obviously didn't share my experience.

I know what its like to listen to these shows without professional musicians ear plugs and with professional musicians ear plugs. I started having problems with sound levels back in 2002-2003. Most likely this is do to the persons age and hearing, or exposure to prior heavy sound levels.

The fact that the majority of the people attending these shows enjoyed it and never felt the need to leave shows, its likely individuals with hearing issues and not U2's sound team.

1. As I said before, no one should be going to these shows without ear plugs, prefereably musicians ear plugs. Even people who feel they don't need them(the majority unforutnately) should wear them.

2. As U2 fans get older and more of them don't wear hearing protection, the number of people complaining about the sound will increase. A certain percentage of the crowd already has hearing issues that they did not 10 years ago and this will impact how they hear the concert.

3. We already have 30% to 40% of the crowd at most of those shows sitting down now when NO one would be sitting 7 or 8 years ago. Age related issues probably influence that. Guess what, age impacts hearing to. Joe and the sound team are probably the best in the industry. The quality of their work has not changed. But fans are older now and certain percentage of them are going through hearing changes.


          To some up, if it was too loud, or you thought the sound was bad at a U2 show, its far more likely to be do to your hearing or the fact that you did not wear ear plugs than it is to U2 and their soundteam. The band and Joe can't force you to wear ear plugs, but you should. They do. The band and Joe can't adjust the sound and sound level for the smaller percentage of the crowd that has had changes in their hearing.


          That does not mean U2 and Joe are perfect, they are not. But all of these concerts from the first tour to the latest have always been played at sound levels where everyone in the audience should be wearing ear plugs. People who are younger are less likely to notice the impact of high sound levels. As you get older, those symptoms become more pronounced. The U2 fan base, in the United States at least, is in the 40 to 55 age group mostly. Its not that U2 and Joe lost their ability somehow, its that your not 22 anymore and should have been wearing ear plugs at concerts since you were 22.

If EVERYONE needs to wear earplugs then the volume is too loud. Period.  What is the point of spending tons of money to crank up the sound so EVERYONE, not just people with already damaged hearing, has to wear ďprofessional musicians earplugsĒ.


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1. Musicians have to crank up the sound on guitar, bass, and vocals so those pieces are as loud or louder than the Drums. Otherwise it won't sound right.

2. The music in an arena or stadium needs to be louder than the crowd which could be 20,000 or 60,000 people depending on the venue. Otherwise you have the experience of the Beatles first show at Shea stadium where the band could not hear what they were playing and neither could the crowd.


3. Remember, you should be wearing ear plugs when you mow your lawn. To properly protect your hearing in this world, you need ear plugs most places you go.


4. Finally, you should be wearing ear plugs at every concert you go to even if you feel you don't need to. The sound amplification, designed to be louder than the crowd, is more than enough to warrant the use of ear plugs. Same with most music in bars and especially night clubs.


5. If you were to down the sound, you would have difficulty hearing the band over the noise that 20,000 or 60,000 people make as well the drums being much louder than the vocals, guitar and bass.

Just let me say.  Iíve been to many U2 concerts and this is the first time Iíve had this issue. 


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Which is why getting your ears checked would be a good thing. There is always a first time when a person starts to notice their hearing problems.


Quote
My wife never wears earplugs and never complains about volume level and she asked me for a pair of earplugs and said the sound was so distorted she would have left if it wasnít for me wanting to be there.  I alway use musicians earplugs I got from guitar center.  I know all about that.



I would leave to if I did not have my ear plugs, but that has been my position now for 15 years. Without ear plugs, I don't go to concerts, night clubs, and many bars. I even wear them to mow the lawn. I imagine your wife is about the same age, maybe it would be good to have a hearing check up as well. I get a check up every two years, primarily to clean the wax build up always caused by using ear plugs in so many different situations.

 An isolated postion in the venue where the sound is bad is possible. But that was much more likely in the early days than now given the technology.


Quote
You can complain all you want that I like to condemn U2.  Iím sorry that you define fandom as some kind of loyalty that you can never admit anything less than spectacular on U2ís part.  I define it as sticking with the band even if they have a string of less than stellar albums or some disappointing shows.  Discussion without honesty is meaningless to me.  I am telling you, your seats at your show may have been fine but there was a problem where I was sitting at mine.  I wish you could just disagree with me respectfully, without the slam talk.


              I like lots of bands but I don't post on message boards for bands that I feel have albums that are less than stellar and or disappointing shows. I don't have time to do that. There is a personality trait out where people tend to only comment when they have something negative to say. As BONO said, remember what bathroom walls used to look like before the internet?

              I'm much more in the group of, if you have nothing nice to say, don't say anything at all. This is a U2 FAN FORUM. It should not be a surprise to anyone that there are forum members who will defend the band on any issue.

As I clearly stated, we both used ear plugs and I have used them since high school.  The problem persisted with the earplugs.  The sound was still badly distorted.

I understand your opinion of what it means to be a fan and Iím fine with that for you.  I donít understand why you feel the need to define what it should mean for me and why you feel justified in insulting me because I have a different definition.  Why donít we stick to discussing the point of the posts and leave the personal critical commentary out.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: BlueSquirrel on November 08, 2018, 01:41:04 PM
I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on November 08, 2018, 06:31:40 PM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.
Title: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on November 08, 2018, 07:30:10 PM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  Iíve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I donít see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didnít blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on November 09, 2018, 07:20:56 AM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  Iíve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I donít see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didnít blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

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There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on November 09, 2018, 08:18:21 AM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  Iíve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I donít see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didnít blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.

Okay, my hearing is fine and so is that of the three other people I went with that thought the speaker was blown or something.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: wons on November 10, 2018, 12:25:53 PM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  Iíve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I donít see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didnít blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.

Okay, my hearing is fine and so is that of the three other people I went with that thought the speaker was blown or something.


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So you and the the three other people you went to the show with, went to see an Ear, nose and throat doctor just prior to show who ran test to confirm that? Just because you THINK your hearing is fine, does not make it so. Again, only a test run by a professional can confirm that. Plus, changes in your hearing can come on suddenly, so if you actually had a legit test done a few years ago, it might not be accurate anymore.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on November 10, 2018, 01:36:10 PM
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I saw U2 in Paris at the Hotel Accor Arena (aka Bercy). It's a place where I've seen many good concerts (highlights were probably Radiohead and a legendary local band called Indochine). Unfortunately no concert ever sounded as bad as U2 that night (on the ninth). We were on the floor quite close to the band which was great however we had to wear protective earplugs. As you have already said, the sound was oddly distorted, it was deafeningly loud and not like on The Joshua Tree Tour which sounded not perfect but a lot better than just ok imho (excellent guitars and vocals, and although the drums were sometimes buried in the mix at times, overall it was a wonderful experience).
At Bercy, the band didn't seem to mind or to notice so I wondered whether they had hearing problems, or maybe they were wearing earbuds themselves to hear their clicktrack and it protected their ears ? Anyway, I can't imagine the state of their crew members down in Guitar World / Amp Alley under the stage....

Once again, I'm willing to bet its you and not them or anything they did. You should ALWAYS be wearing hearing protection at U2 concert. This is rock music, arena rock, stadium rock, its LOUD. Hearing problems also sometimes appear suddenly. I remember seeing Def Leppard in 1992 without hearing protection and it was loud, but I was able to stand it. I was 26 years younger back then. My friend who was in a band and been exposed to massive levels of volume from his own band playing in small enclosed places had lots of problems. He developed a massive headache and had to go into the bathroom for a while. The difference in experiences, could probably be explained by the level of hearing damage he already had.

        I've worn hearing protection for everything from bars, nightclubs, all concerts and even mowing the lawn. Hearing damage over time is a real thing and it changes how your EARS and brain are able to process the sound. Speech, music, and other things that sound distorted could very easily be do to your own ears and not something someone else has done. That's not what anyone wants to hear of course, but it happens and happens a lot more as people age.

        If the band were at fault, you would have thousands of people talking about it and reviews of the show would mention it.

Actually, there have been a lot of people talking about it.  Iíve been to four arena rock shows this year and U2 was the only one that was an issue. 

The screen directly over my head had an area that was dead the whole show.  Just a black square in the same spot.  Equipment fails.  I donít see how you can be so certain that the speaker directly in front of me didnít blow a voice coil or have some other issue.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

There can be equipment problems and other failures. But usually, on average, these shows are professionally done, of very high quality and the equipment is well maintained and works. There are nearly 20,000 people at these arena shows. When reviews of the show don't report problems and the thousands of people don't report problems, then its likely that the dozen or so people who thought something was wrong may actually have issues with their hearing or other things.

Okay, my hearing is fine and so is that of the three other people I went with that thought the speaker was blown or something.


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So you and the the three other people you went to the show with, went to see an Ear, nose and throat doctor just prior to show who ran test to confirm that? Just because you THINK your hearing is fine, does not make it so. Again, only a test run by a professional can confirm that. Plus, changes in your hearing can come on suddenly, so if you actually had a legit test done a few years ago, it might not be accurate anymore.

Oh wow Wons. You are amazing.


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Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: noelle510 on November 12, 2018, 03:40:21 PM
All rock 'n' roll concerts are too loud. Not sure what to do about it though. Earplugs are the least you can do.
Title: Re: Is the sound of concerts too loud?
Post by: Tortuga on November 12, 2018, 04:21:20 PM
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All rock 'n' roll concerts are too loud. Not sure what to do about it though. Earplugs are the least you can do.

Wons suggests you get your hearing checked because you probably need hearing aids.  Sounds backwards I know but...


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