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Tours / Re: What the ei shows I saw meant to me...
« Last post by popsadie on Today at 11:27:11 AM »
Wow. You have put into words many of my feelings about the show. It might not have been the best tour they have done, but it might be one of the most personally impacting. I love that there are artists like u2 who ask these questions about life, live, and mortality and invite their audience to share in their explorations.
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The Music and Lyrics / Re: I just don't care anymore
« Last post by laoghaire on Today at 11:12:32 AM »
I think everyone is arguing semantics.

Does anyone here think U2 are a group of hacks who perform ghostwritten songs? No?
Does anyone here think U2 crafted every little note and nuance all by their foursome? No?

I'd say that we all believe U2 are a talented band who write their own songs, but who hire producers to edit, give feedback, push them, add their ideas. Like every other goddamn artist out there.

Credit to U2? GIVEN.
Credit to producers? GIVEN.

I think that, bottom line, some people are feeling insecure, wondering if this band they admire so much might actually just be smoke and mirrors. THEY AREN'T. They are as talented as you originally thought. Maybe even more so. But that doesn't mean the producers aren't part of the process. AND THAT'S OK AND INDUSTRY STANDARD. Just like Stephen King has an editor - of course he does. But he is still the goddamn writer.
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So I'm on record as to having the "slaves are looking for someone to lead them" line kind of stick in my craw, and I had already found another perspective on it (that they are not looking for a master, like I originally heard it).

But I recently realized something else. See what happens when you put it in the context of this old lyric:

Outside are the prisoners
Inside, the free
Set them free, set them free

He is turning the definition of a slave on its head. He was talking about an entirely different group of people in GOOYOW.

<satisfied>
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Aha, yes, that's the one. But out of context I would have been having to figure that one out too. Somebody wrote ARATHH recently and it took me a loooooong time. (I won't torture you. It's A Room at the Heartbreak Hotel.)
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The Music and Lyrics / Re: In a Little While - and bonus jazz question!
« Last post by Tortuga on Today at 10:14:18 AM »
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IALW? Yeah, that's it, thanks for confirming.

So, yeah, there are lounge songs like Velvet Dress, but after listening to some jazz this morning, nothing rang a bell for a reeeeeaaal jazz song. Could be interesting if they tried to tackle that. Would love to hear Larry do jazz drums.

Man I often canít think of what songs the abbreviations are.  IALW?


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Oh geez, the title of the post.


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The Music and Lyrics / Re: In a Little While - and bonus jazz question!
« Last post by Tortuga on Today at 10:13:25 AM »
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IALW? Yeah, that's it, thanks for confirming.

So, yeah, there are lounge songs like Velvet Dress, but after listening to some jazz this morning, nothing rang a bell for a reeeeeaaal jazz song. Could be interesting if they tried to tackle that. Would love to hear Larry do jazz drums.

Man I often canít think of what songs the abbreviations are.  IALW?


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The Music and Lyrics / I just don't care anymore
« Last post by Tortuga on Today at 10:10:04 AM »
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The real questions are : "do you like the songs of Daniel Lanois?" or "do you listening to Brian Eno albums?", "do you really like Ryan Tedder and One Republic?". Me, not!!! To me, that means that U2 is writing their songs. If not, I would like Daniel Lanois's album, One Republic or Brian Eno...

About "Summer of love", I remember U2 made a videoclip for a song called "Summer Nights" back in 2014, which, I think, turned to "Summer of love". As we know so far, Brent Kutzle was not involve in "songs of innocence", and he reportly wrote the guitar melody of "Summer of love", but it seems the song was already existing long before he came in the process... so, U2 inspired him in a way

About Brian Eno, he's a great producer with lots of big idea. But I can't listen to a single song he wrote alone. Same for Daniel Lanois. If they were the genius, where are their hits, classic songs? why U2 is more known? why have they worked with U2 so long?

Another thing, Danger Mouse worked with U2 for so long, I love a lot Danger Mouse music, but I can't hear his influence on the band, which means to me that U2 is stronger than any producers in its way.

By the way, I'm still waiting for U2 album really produced by Danger Mouse... Maybe the next one called MANhattan, who knows?

I donít get the point of this.  Music is not a competition.  If you like Lanois and know his work, youíre going to hear and appreciate his influence in U2ís work.  If you donít, you probably wonít.  That he or Eno havenít had a ďhitĒ is irrelevant.  Theyíre not trying to make the kind of music that will get played on the radio.  Do you really think experimental ambient music would be expected to produce a ďhitĒ?

George Martin never had a hit but no one would suggest he didnít have a significant role in the songs the Beatles composed.  Lanoisí ďThe MakerĒ has been covered many times.  Those musicianís enjoy his music and reflect his influence as a composer.  He is often cited as a significant influence by artists for his own work, not just his production.

I just donít get the need to think U2 isnít helped by other musicians.  It doesnít denigrate their huge artistic achievements in any way.  Pop and Rock music are, by their very nature derivative.  Music is collaborative art. Artist build off one anotherís accomplishments.

 Iím pretty sure U2 is not insecure about acknowledging the contributions of others...they have done so often.

Most of the music I have had the pleasure to enjoy I have found out about by listening to all the musicians credited in the liner notes and exploring cited influences of my favorite artists.  U2 led me to Robbie Robertson and Daniel Lanois.  I cannot imagine anyone who really likes U2 not liking these two artists.  If you like JT-era U2, listen to Robbie Robertson dual with the Edge in a guitar solo and Bono sing back-up.  Listen to Lanois and Bono perform together on Falling At Your Feet.  This is what music is really about.


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I understand your point. I love Daniel Lanois as a producer, he's fantastic, his work with U2, Neil Young or Bob Dylan are great, but that's all. You gave two examples, Robbie Robertson is a great artist and the song you're talking about was co-written by U2, so, yeah, this is a great song. The other one is "Falling at your feet" which is a great song too!! This song is on MDH album and an album of Daniel Lanois called "Shine".  Have you heard this album? I bought it at the time. There's only one good song on it, and it's "Falling at your feet". With all the respect I have for Daniel Lanois, don't you think he would like a carrier like U2? Come  on.

Now, about "One", that's the first time I'm hearing Daniel Lanois wrote this song. In the documentary "From the sky down", U2 show the way "One" was born from a progression of chords improvised by THE EDGE during a jam of "Sick Puppets" that became "Mysterious Ways".

This band is honest! Everytime U2 collaborate with an artist, he was credited.

If you like U2, why searching to destroy the myth all the time? Please.

Lanois did not write one.  I was suggesting only that the hammer-on riff came from him.

I think nearly every song on Shine is great.  Come on, surely you liked ďI Love YouĒ.  You think Sweet Fire of Love, the song co-written by U2 was good but not the rest?  Rod Stewart covered ďBroken ArrowĒ. Off that album and had a major hit.  Robbie Robertson is one of the most recognized song writers in the history of American music.  (Notwithstanding that Levon Helm said he was the inspiration for the lyrics and Robbie never gave him credit AND rhere is much scuttlebut that Robertson was a blatant artistic thief and never gave credit to anyone.  Thatís a different story.)

But again, arguments like this are just silly.  Different people like different music.  Are you trying to apply the transitive property of math to music?  ďI like U2.  I donít like Lanois.  Therefore Lanois cannot have anything to do with my liking U2.Ē  Iím not trying to argue that Lanois is a great composer.  Thatís a matter of personal taste and opinion.  I just donít think it makes sense for a fan of U2 to feel they need to set up arguments that they donít get significant help from their collaborators.  ALL artists need outside influence to stay fresh.  Thatís why U2 doesnít use the same producers for every album. 




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I like Robbie Robertson as an artist, I told it earlier, and I like all his first solo album as well, but we were talking about producers as ghostwriters of U2 songs, which I think is totally untrue and unfair regarding the legacy of the band. Hope you understand...

Fair enough.  I couldnít care less about the legacy of the band or who wrote what relative to their producers.  I donít draw a line between the two.  U2 is four guys but it is also a body of a work with help from lots of people.  I just like the music and that is all I really care about.

For what its worth, I donít think their legacy is anywhere near threatened.  Any music scholar who would opine on their legacy knows this degree of collaboration or ďghost writingĒ is within the range of what is commonly accepted without judgement.  But their producers will be given credit, just as George Martin is often called the fifth Beatle.  I donít know why that would bother anyone but I guess it does bother some people.

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IALW? Yeah, that's it, thanks for confirming.

So, yeah, there are lounge songs like Velvet Dress, but after listening to some jazz this morning, nothing rang a bell for a reeeeeaaal jazz song. Could be interesting if they tried to tackle that. Would love to hear Larry do jazz drums.
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Tours / Re: What the ei shows I saw meant to me...
« Last post by laoghaire on Today at 09:27:45 AM »
I realize there was critique of America's and Europe's direction as a whole, but I felt the emphasis was less critique and more calling upon us to "hold up the sky" and hold fast to the law of love. While MacPhisto had some shots for Trump, I felt like the real critique was in his self-examination. It was he, the showman, who committed those seven deadly sins. This is a very important distinction. It is easy for a Christian to take the commandments (and while there are ten, they are all aspects of just one: love) and examine and police others: you are a sinner, you are not a true Christian or any Christian at all.

But this is not at all what we are called upon to do. The commandments are there for each of us to follow ourselves, to examine in our own hearts, to live. They are not there for us to control and judge others. We are reminded to look at the plank in our own eye before calling out the mote in our neighbor's.

Bono doesn't say, you have to be a Christian, he doesn't say "you're breaking the rules, do this, do that." He talks about his own shortcomings, he shares his own struggles, and he blesses us.

When he pulls the light bulb out of the box, he doesn't just hold it. He pushes it out into the audience, lets its light shine onto us, spreads the light. It's not a sermon, just a blessing. He sings with compassion about the suffering we all have, what the children in us still fear, and gives us the strength to face the darkness gathering around the light. We can do it. We're strong. We're tough enough to be kind. We can hold on.
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It's basically a soul song.
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