Author Topic: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker  (Read 14465 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline eddyjedi

  • Elevated
  • ***
  • Posts: 4,662
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #60 on: March 02, 2014, 04:31:57 PM »
It nothing gets released this year we won't ever get anything again i'd say.

Offline codeguy

  • Elevated
  • ***
  • Posts: 3,787
  • If there is a light, don't let it go out
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #61 on: March 02, 2014, 04:59:28 PM »
I think they have invested too much at this point to back off now ......

Offline OnlyU2

  • Holy Joe
  • ***
  • Posts: 15,812
  • Who's to say what it is will break you
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #62 on: March 02, 2014, 05:04:44 PM »
It's understandable that we're all getting frustrated, which makes us doubt there will be a new album at all.  But with all the talk about it, there's no turning back now.  I still have June marked on my calendar, as for the 2nd album, probably not for another year or two.
I feel that it will be well worth the 5 year wait......

Offline LateReg

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #63 on: March 02, 2014, 05:38:02 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Working on two albums?    What a bunch of BS.     That confirms to me that they don't like the DM production effort enough to release it and it will never see the light of day.    If all they want is an album full of "hits", it will never happen.   The only way for U2 to survive this is to go down the road that created Fez/BB, the original ABOY, etc., and they just won't let themselves do it.   I dont see how anyone finds them interesting any more otherwise.   

I don't understand the love affair with Fez/BB. IMHO it's songs like this that cause people not to find them interesting anymore. This is what they are saying about being esoteric. They need to create intelligent music that reaches the masses-Fez/BB just doesn't do this. There is little music out there that has much palpable meaning to it anymore, but U2 were able to fill that space at one time and that's what brought people to them. I believe Invisible and Ordinary Love provide some hope in this direction and I can't wait to see how they bring meaning back to mainstream music again.

U2 didn't ultimately reach the masses because of their "hits".  With the exception of NYD and Pride, it was the deep, "deep" cuts that got them to the brink and build-up to TJT.   Can't imagine sticking with them this long without having heard Bad, TUF, 40, Tomorrow, etc.   Take those out of the equation and they would have been a Duran Duran/Simple Minds-caliber act.   I am all for them getting airplay, but it isn't going to happen with their current recipe for songwriting.   

As for Fez/BB, that was a brief stroke of genius for them, and I would hope others feel similarly.    With the possible exception of portions of the title cut (which, ironically, were likely derived from BB), there was nothing else on NLOTH that was the fan-making U2 of old.

Agree 100%. U2 are very confused and so are any fans who think the way back to "relevance" is with hit songs. Think about the most respected, relevant bands of the past however many years. Radiohead, Arcade Fire, etc. They're bands who are popular enough to top the billboard chart without so much as a single on the radio. Because being relevant isn't about singles, it's about making great uncompromised music, plain and simple. Why U2 doesn't realize that other "relevant" bands aren't relevant because of hits is beyond me.

Offline doctoru2

  • Wanderer
  • *
  • Posts: 55
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #64 on: March 02, 2014, 06:44:51 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Working on two albums?    What a bunch of BS.     That confirms to me that they don't like the DM production effort enough to release it and it will never see the light of day.    If all they want is an album full of "hits", it will never happen.   The only way for U2 to survive this is to go down the road that created Fez/BB, the original ABOY, etc., and they just won't let themselves do it.   I dont see how anyone finds them interesting any more otherwise.   

I don't understand the love affair with Fez/BB. IMHO it's songs like this that cause people not to find them interesting anymore. This is what they are saying about being esoteric. They need to create intelligent music that reaches the masses-Fez/BB just doesn't do this. There is little music out there that has much palpable meaning to it anymore, but U2 were able to fill that space at one time and that's what brought people to them. I believe Invisible and Ordinary Love provide some hope in this direction and I can't wait to see how they bring meaning back to mainstream music again.

U2 didn't ultimately reach the masses because of their "hits".  With the exception of NYD and Pride, it was the deep, "deep" cuts that got them to the brink and build-up to TJT.   Can't imagine sticking with them this long without having heard Bad, TUF, 40, Tomorrow, etc.   Take those out of the equation and they would have been a Duran Duran/Simple Minds-caliber act.   I am all for them getting airplay, but it isn't going to happen with their current recipe for songwriting.   

As for Fez/BB, that was a brief stroke of genius for them, and I would hope others feel similarly.    With the possible exception of portions of the title cut (which, ironically, were likely derived from BB), there was nothing else on NLOTH that was the fan-making U2 of old.

Agree 100%. U2 are very confused and so are any fans who think the way back to "relevance" is with hit songs. Think about the most respected, relevant bands of the past however many years. Radiohead, Arcade Fire, etc. They're bands who are popular enough to top the billboard chart without so much as a single on the radio. Because being relevant isn't about singles, it's about making great uncompromised music, plain and simple. Why U2 doesn't realize that other "relevant" bands aren't relevant because of hits is beyond me.

I understand your views, but there is a caveat.

Radiohead's fans are significant enough to sell 100,000 or so copies of their newest album during the first week.  And in today's market, that is often more than enough to reach #1.  For a week, Radiohead is discussed.  The following week, the album drops to #10 or so, then rather quickly falls from the Top 200.  Mere months after the album is released, no media member is discussing Radiohead.

This has NOTHING to do with the quality of the album.  It's merely a reflection of the lack of a hit single.  Even something that floats near the Top 40 for them is enough to keep the album near the top (note that many artists who have huge hits do not necessarily have a huge selling album - this tends to flip a bit for groups that have been around for a while).

By U2 having at least one if not two hits that are true Top 40 material (meaning more than one and done, like GOYB), that will keep the album on the charts.  And hence U2 are discussed for a while.  More discussion means more relevance.

You may not like this, but it appears this is what U2 want.  I can't say I blame them.  They work on albums for some time.  They certainly don't want it off the charts in 3 or 4 months.

Offline Messenger

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,086
  • The universe is beautiful but cold.
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #65 on: March 02, 2014, 07:10:07 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I understand your views, but there is a caveat.

Radiohead's fans are significant enough to sell 100,000 or so copies of their newest album during the first week.  And in today's market, that is often more than enough to reach #1.  For a week, Radiohead is discussed.  The following week, the album drops to #10 or so, then rather quickly falls from the Top 200.  Mere months after the album is released, no media member is discussing Radiohead.

This has NOTHING to do with the quality of the album.


Until the year end hits, and everyone publishes their Best of lists and more often than not, that very same Radiohead album is mentioned, listed near the top and discussed again.

That has NOTHING to do with the marketing of the album.



Offline LateReg

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #66 on: March 02, 2014, 08:47:08 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Working on two albums?    What a bunch of BS.     That confirms to me that they don't like the DM production effort enough to release it and it will never see the light of day.    If all they want is an album full of "hits", it will never happen.   The only way for U2 to survive this is to go down the road that created Fez/BB, the original ABOY, etc., and they just won't let themselves do it.   I dont see how anyone finds them interesting any more otherwise.   

I don't understand the love affair with Fez/BB. IMHO it's songs like this that cause people not to find them interesting anymore. This is what they are saying about being esoteric. They need to create intelligent music that reaches the masses-Fez/BB just doesn't do this. There is little music out there that has much palpable meaning to it anymore, but U2 were able to fill that space at one time and that's what brought people to them. I believe Invisible and Ordinary Love provide some hope in this direction and I can't wait to see how they bring meaning back to mainstream music again.

U2 didn't ultimately reach the masses because of their "hits".  With the exception of NYD and Pride, it was the deep, "deep" cuts that got them to the brink and build-up to TJT.   Can't imagine sticking with them this long without having heard Bad, TUF, 40, Tomorrow, etc.   Take those out of the equation and they would have been a Duran Duran/Simple Minds-caliber act.   I am all for them getting airplay, but it isn't going to happen with their current recipe for songwriting.   

As for Fez/BB, that was a brief stroke of genius for them, and I would hope others feel similarly.    With the possible exception of portions of the title cut (which, ironically, were likely derived from BB), there was nothing else on NLOTH that was the fan-making U2 of old.

Agree 100%. U2 are very confused and so are any fans who think the way back to "relevance" is with hit songs. Think about the most respected, relevant bands of the past however many years. Radiohead, Arcade Fire, etc. They're bands who are popular enough to top the billboard chart without so much as a single on the radio. Because being relevant isn't about singles, it's about making great uncompromised music, plain and simple. Why U2 doesn't realize that other "relevant" bands aren't relevant because of hits is beyond me.

I understand your views, but there is a caveat.

Radiohead's fans are significant enough to sell 100,000 or so copies of their newest album during the first week.  And in today's market, that is often more than enough to reach #1.  For a week, Radiohead is discussed.  The following week, the album drops to #10 or so, then rather quickly falls from the Top 200.  Mere months after the album is released, no media member is discussing Radiohead.

This has NOTHING to do with the quality of the album.  It's merely a reflection of the lack of a hit single.  Even something that floats near the Top 40 for them is enough to keep the album near the top (note that many artists who have huge hits do not necessarily have a huge selling album - this tends to flip a bit for groups that have been around for a while).

By U2 having at least one if not two hits that are true Top 40 material (meaning more than one and done, like GOYB), that will keep the album on the charts.  And hence U2 are discussed for a while.  More discussion means more relevance.

You may not like this, but it appears this is what U2 want.  I can't say I blame them.  They work on albums for some time.  They certainly don't want it off the charts in 3 or 4 months.

Thanks for the reply.

I know what you're saying, but I think you're underestimating Radiohead's relevance. They are considered a more relevant band than U2 over the past 15 years. Hands down. Sure, we may be looking at relevance from different perspectives. I want U2's late career to be thought of 20 years from now. That's true relevance, and they're sacrificing it by thinking about singles. They should focus on making a true work of art, which would sell anyway BECAUSE THEY ARE U2. Since they are so big and have such a great fanbase, if it is good, it will sell, and they are underestimating that.

Offline LateReg

  • Babyface
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #67 on: March 02, 2014, 08:49:25 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I understand your views, but there is a caveat.

Radiohead's fans are significant enough to sell 100,000 or so copies of their newest album during the first week.  And in today's market, that is often more than enough to reach #1.  For a week, Radiohead is discussed.  The following week, the album drops to #10 or so, then rather quickly falls from the Top 200.  Mere months after the album is released, no media member is discussing Radiohead.

This has NOTHING to do with the quality of the album.


Until the year end hits, and everyone publishes their Best of lists and more often than not, that very same Radiohead album is mentioned, listed near the top and discussed again.

That has NOTHING to do with the marketing of the album.

Exactly.

Offline JaraSangASongAWeapon

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 597
  • And the moon turned red over One Tree Hill
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #68 on: March 03, 2014, 12:43:46 AM »
This is how I see it and it's a guess...U2's contract with Live Nation runs out in 2020 and the 2 albums Bono mentions is their last obligation towards that deal. I can't imagine they'd only record 1 album, tour/promote that, at the snail's pace they're going (5 years to the day of NLOTH), and then record/tour another album, because...2020. Clock is ticking.

Offline an tha

  • Airborne Ranger
  • ***
  • Posts: 9,430
  • You can swallow, or you can spit.
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #69 on: March 03, 2014, 01:11:28 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Working on two albums?    What a bunch of BS.     That confirms to me that they don't like the DM production effort enough to release it and it will never see the light of day.    If all they want is an album full of "hits", it will never happen.   The only way for U2 to survive this is to go down the road that created Fez/BB, the original ABOY, etc., and they just won't let themselves do it.   I dont see how anyone finds them interesting any more otherwise.   

I don't understand the love affair with Fez/BB. IMHO it's songs like this that cause people not to find them interesting anymore. This is what they are saying about being esoteric. They need to create intelligent music that reaches the masses-Fez/BB just doesn't do this. There is little music out there that has much palpable meaning to it anymore, but U2 were able to fill that space at one time and that's what brought people to them. I believe Invisible and Ordinary Love provide some hope in this direction and I can't wait to see how they bring meaning back to mainstream music again.

U2 didn't ultimately reach the masses because of their "hits".  With the exception of NYD and Pride, it was the deep, "deep" cuts that got them to the brink and build-up to TJT.   Can't imagine sticking with them this long without having heard Bad, TUF, 40, Tomorrow, etc.   Take those out of the equation and they would have been a Duran Duran/Simple Minds-caliber act.   I am all for them getting airplay, but it isn't going to happen with their current recipe for songwriting.   

As for Fez/BB, that was a brief stroke of genius for them, and I would hope others feel similarly.    With the possible exception of portions of the title cut (which, ironically, were likely derived from BB), there was nothing else on NLOTH that was the fan-making U2 of old.

Agree 100%. U2 are very confused and so are any fans who think the way back to "relevance" is with hit songs. Think about the most respected, relevant bands of the past however many years. Radiohead, Arcade Fire, etc. They're bands who are popular enough to top the billboard chart without so much as a single on the radio. Because being relevant isn't about singles, it's about making great uncompromised music, plain and simple. Why U2 doesn't realize that other "relevant" bands aren't relevant because of hits is beyond me.

This.

It isn't 1987 anymore - u2 should be long past worrying about hit singles. Radiohead as you mentioned don't care, hey they are playing 20,000 capacity arenas and not playing a 'hit' song!

The worst part of u2 chasing the pop kids and hits is that it makes them make music they aren't good at making - namely 'pop' music.

Their legacy is secure, they are wealthy beyond comprehension, they have a huge fan base who will follow them and buy albums and tickets . . . Average joe and pop kids don't care about u2.

U2 for some reason seem obsessed with chasing them and they aren't going to catch them, they would be better served realising that and not compromising their art in trying to be what they are not.

Offline Peter Parker

  • Party Girl/Boy
  • **
  • Posts: 520
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #70 on: March 03, 2014, 02:10:21 AM »
I dont think they are lost. I think they know exactly what they are doing. Wait  for it...

Offline Bantering ram

  • Headache in a Suitcase
  • *
  • Posts: 304
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #71 on: March 03, 2014, 04:24:48 AM »
"We've got 2 of them we're working on"

That'll be new mixes for 'Invisible' and 'Ordinary Love' then.


surit87

  • Guest
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #72 on: March 03, 2014, 05:48:55 AM »
Oh great! Now we don't even know how many albums to expect.

Offline wik73

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 922
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #73 on: March 03, 2014, 06:59:52 PM »

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I dont think they are lost. I think they know exactly what they are doing. Wait  for it...

+1

Offline trevgreg

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,248
Re: New Bono interview with Amanda Brunker
« Reply #74 on: March 03, 2014, 07:37:39 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
The worst part of u2 chasing the pop kids and hits is that it makes them make music they aren't good at making - namely 'pop' music.

Until they release the long-awaited hip hop album, I'm not too convinced that they're going after the kids here.