Author Topic: U2 failure to understand technology a problem  (Read 7537 times)

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Offline aurabender

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U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« on: March 12, 2014, 02:34:18 PM »
I was going to derail a "news" thread, but figured I would start a new one instead to maybe provoke a general discussion.
I think this current PR mess the band has found them self in, and it is a mess, is a very good example of the band's strange failure to embrace modern media and technology. As unnamed "sources" stir turmoil, which is then spun into a storm by the media, the band is clearly to blame. Imagine what a simple "tweet" from a single band saying something like "No big delay...just still working on the album" could have done to calm the waters?
I understand that somewhere along the way the band chose to consider themselves "above" the daily grind of instant media such as Facebook and Twitter. But if the President of the United States can post on Facebook, and the Pope can tweet, four guys in a band can. Bono may think he is above the Pope and The President of the United States, but he isn't.
When you look at the "official" Facebok page of the band during all of this, it is a joke. This is ironic when you think that this is the band that, with Zoo TV, probably pushed modern media technology forward by a good five years .
For the most part, the band seems to have  been willing to leave modern media in the hands of its fanbase. Which is great until your fanbase becomes entirely confused and splintered. I think that a lot of the not as great as expected reception of NLPTH was in how it was packaged and delivered.
No one wants to see the members of U2 tweeting about their breakfast choices of the day, but they are literally absent form the  conversation. I think this mess in the media now is a collision of the Live Nation forces and their grasp of getting ANY news out quickly and briefly to the online world, verus the standard  support that U2 has had on their team for years, who believe in very grand, but very sparse moments in the limelight.



Offline eddyjedi

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 02:39:36 PM »
I agree a simple tweet would suffice from their twitter page. They could post videos from the studio et al. The secrecy is infuriating

Offline an tha

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2014, 02:43:39 PM »
U2 are the worst band that i have an interest in for communicating with their fans. I know they are 'huge' and all that - but they are incredibly backwards when it comes to communicating.

Offline imaginary friend

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2014, 02:45:13 PM »
all that stuff might be irritating to some people, but it has nothing to do with their job, which is making music.

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2014, 03:00:33 PM »
Fans would never be happy.  "Still working on album", as a tweet, would only cause fans to speculate further.

Some artists are pretty good at social media.  Trent Reznor is one.  But it's funny how all of this rampant speculation only serves to emulate how things used to be before the internet--back when they made the best music of their career.

Non-issue.  What needs to change is fans demanding the band talk to them like they're best friends, giving updates on how they're doing.

Offline Runtmg

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2014, 11:25:28 PM »

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Fans would never be happy.  "Still working on album", as a tweet, would only cause fans to speculate further.

Some artists are pretty good at social media.  Trent Reznor is one.  But it's funny how all of this rampant speculation only serves to emulate how things used to be before the internet--back when they made the best music of their career.

Non-issue.  What needs to change is fans demanding the band talk to them like they're best friends, giving updates on how they're doing.

Nonsense.  Fans buy albums.  Fans but concert tickets.  Fans identify with artists.  The problem here is that fans don't identify with the band anymore.  Asking fans to change is silly.

Offline Siberian Tiger

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2014, 11:38:19 PM »
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all that stuff might be irritating to some people, but it has nothing to do with their job, which is making music.

And for now, we don't really even know IF they are actually making any music. The whole debacle is muddied by so many perspectives and spin doctoring.

Offline Argo

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2014, 02:48:33 AM »
I don't think the problem is about them not embracing or understanding technology. But rather, what we have here is a failure to communicate. Any form of communication at all (for the nit-pickers I am discounting anonymous spokespeople giving a vague single update to 1 media organisation), let alone something as advanced as twitter. I'd be happy with an update on a stone tablet at the moment. 

Offline Siberian Tiger

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2014, 08:28:50 AM »
Anonymous spokes people; any of us could claim to be one of those, as some on this forum have claimed to have inside connections in the past.  It's kind of annoying to hear The Guardian use the phrase "spokes person". It sounds pretty unreliable to me.

Offline emuhunter

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2014, 08:40:14 AM »
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Anonymous spokes people; any of us could claim to be one of those, as some on this forum have claimed to have inside connections in the past.  It's kind of annoying to hear The Guardian use the phrase "spokes person". It sounds pretty unreliable to me.

But, the difference is if WE went to Spin, Rolling Stone, etc claiming to be an anonymous spokesperson there's no way in hell they'd publish what we had to say. That's what people don't seem to get.

A spokesperson is someone designated to speak for another individual, which is how big organizations get messages out to the media (especially when they're trying to not overstay their welcome in the public eye, such as a band who just came off a charity single/Oscar nominated song campaign but that is wrapping up an album and getting ready to release THAT as well). Nothing unreliable about that.

Offline Argo

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2014, 08:48:24 AM »
If the spokesperson is authorised to say something to refute something else, what's wrong with them being prepared to identify themselves ie Joe Bloggs, spokesperson on behalf of U2, says ....

Offline emuhunter

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2014, 09:47:03 AM »
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If the spokesperson is authorised to say something to refute something else, what's wrong with them being prepared to identify themselves ie Joe Bloggs, spokesperson on behalf of U2, says ....

Because traditionally that's not the role that spokespeople play. If it's "Joe Bloggs says ..... " people will be caught up in "WHO IS JOE BLOGGS TO SPEAK FOR U2?!" as opposed to taking the statement at face value as a representative of the band. Also, there is a BIG difference between "unnamed sources" and "a representative of the band," even if the representative isn't named in the article. An "unnamed source" requests anonymity before sharing their information, which in and of itself is something of a cause for careful consideration on the part of a reader.

Offline Runtmg

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2014, 10:19:07 AM »
The proof is as they say in the pudding.  No one from the U2 camp is denying the validity of the story.

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2014, 10:19:58 AM »
It would be great (to me at least) a tweet or a post on FB sometimes from one of them personally to update us... I don't think it would cost so much for them do it. But I know that's impossible. They still want to mantain this "aura" of unattainableness that might have worked well in the 90's and early 00's, but is anachronistic in this new decade of social media. Even irritating for many fans. But it's not just their problem, all the big bands seem to act this way.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 10:23:46 AM by Edgedisciple »

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: U2 failure to understand technology a problem
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2014, 11:05:19 AM »
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Fans would never be happy.  "Still working on album", as a tweet, would only cause fans to speculate further.

Some artists are pretty good at social media.  Trent Reznor is one.  But it's funny how all of this rampant speculation only serves to emulate how things used to be before the internet--back when they made the best music of their career.

Non-issue.  What needs to change is fans demanding the band talk to them like they're best friends, giving updates on how they're doing.

Nonsense.  Fans buy albums.  Fans but concert tickets.  Fans identify with artists.  The problem here is that fans don't identify with the band anymore.  Asking fans to change is silly.

Fans not identifying with the band is only a problem if they then don't buy the albums or concert tickets.  We can argue whether or not that's been the case, but I'm guessing 360's massive success is a pretty good argument against that theory being a reality for them.

David Bowie went 10 years without any public statements.  Peter Gabriel has been talking about I/O for practically decades.  The band doesn't owe anyone a statement on what they're doing.  Sure, it can be frustrating if you're a fan and are eager for the next album--but that doesn't entitle them to any kind of update.