Author Topic: Other rock stars views of U2  (Read 29875 times)

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Offline codeguy

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2014, 02:48:07 PM »
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I do find all these opinions really interesting. But most of them where uttered more than 10 years ago. By that time, U2 were actually the best band in the whole universe, you could say they have the audience wrapped around their finger.
What I would love is to read/listen to some other points of view from the Vertigo era until now, this year. At any rate, whatever that Gallagher thinks about U2, I just don't care. He's disgusting, to say the least, I never liked him at all, I won't take his comments, taking into account they are coming from an insanity virtuoso.
You're thinking of Liam, not Noel, I assume?

Offline Achtung Rory

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2014, 03:19:28 PM »
Henry Rollins 2014

As a lifelong fan ,it was an easy choice to agree to produce the new U2 album.😃

Offline whateverman42

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2014, 03:36:28 PM »
Neil Tennant of the Pet Shop Boys has always had an interest in U2 and regularly offers up comments on them. He can be very negative, he was especially in the 80's, but on the whole I think he's a fan of their music. These are some I found searching the web:


Neil Tennant, quoted by Chris Heath not long after Rattle And Hum was released, saw it as something only loved by "ghastly rock purists... who want it to be like 1969 again", declaring that, "We hate it for exactly the same reasons Johnny Rotten said he hated dinosaur groups in 1976... it's stultifying, it says nothing, it is big and pompous and ugly."

"I think that there's music being made today that is pompous, but ultimately hollow. U2's songs don't say anything; they're posturing."

"In the week that George Bush was elected president, U2 was the No. 1 group in America. Millions of the people who bought Rattle and Hum then went out and voted for Bush, apparently seeing no contradiction. I think that may show the weakness of their message."

-

"Their album is produced by Daniel Lanois, Brian Eno and Steve Lillywhite! I can’t even work out how that all works! And then there’s the four of them!" he said. "I think with us, musically, it still has a freshness and energy about it and maybe it comes to us easier, in that sense."

"The thing with U2 is that they want to be the biggest group in the world and I applaud that but we’ve never really [wanted that]," he said. "And it’s not because we’re not ambitious because we are - we’ve had a lot of number one singles and probably more than U2 – but that [desire] is a rock thing, isn’t it?"

-

"[In the '90s] there were lots of pop musicals, so it felt like a bit a cliché to work in that, though really most of those are just catalog musicals.

"There's just Elton John, and Boy George, and Bono and The Edge, who are having a rather ghastly time in New York at the moment. I'm sure they're discovering that when you start to write musicals it's a lot more difficult than you might have thought, because your music has got to work theatrically.

"I think we're lucky that we can write music theatrically. It's very difficult for rock music. There's been a lot of debate over this, saying that rock music doesn't work because the rhythmic dynamic of it is not particularly flexible."

-

"I've always been against the idea of rock stars lecturing people as if they know something the rest of us don't - it looks arrogant.

"It's not as if they have a private source of information. To state the obvious as if you are the only person that knows it is intellectually weak. Like Bono - he uses his celebrity, but in doing so he increases his celebrity. I'm never even totally convinced that the rest of U2 feel comfortable with that."

-

"We were at Elton's house in the South Of France," he grins, "and Bono and his wife came round to dinner. We wondered how he was going to be because we had done a slightly satirical version of Where The Streets Have No Name. Bono is quite obsessed about the difference between rock and pop. We were in the '80s, but we kind of grew out of it.

"There was a lot of drinking going on so when Bono jumped into the pool from Elton's terrace, I thought, 'I can't let him get away with that' and jumped in after him. He said, 'OK, it's Rock 1, Pop 1', but I think he's much more competitive than I am. It wasn't a typical evening at Elton's. Elton doesn't usually stay up that late."

Offline Gypsy Heart

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2014, 05:37:02 PM »
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I do find all these opinions really interesting. But most of them where uttered more than 10 years ago. By that time, U2 were actually the best band in the whole universe, you could say they have the audience wrapped around their finger.
What I would love is to read/listen to some other points of view from the Vertigo era until now, this year. At any rate, whatever that Gallagher thinks about U2, I just don't care. He's disgusting, to say the least, I never liked him at all, I won't take his comments, taking into account they are coming from an insanity virtuoso.
You're thinking of Liam, not Noel, I assume?

That's correct. I was talking about Liam.

Offline bondylan

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2014, 06:11:54 PM »
Here is a good one from Ian Mculloch 1997. "Then there was U2' s album TJT and I remember thinking they're making records that are better than ours and that really scared me".

Offline EnduringChill

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2014, 06:45:45 PM »
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Henry Rollins 2014

As a lifelong fan ,it was an easy choice to agree to produce the new U2 album.
Good one. :P

Offline EnduringChill

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2014, 06:47:53 PM »
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Neil Tennant of the Pet Shop Boys has always had an interest in U2 and regularly offers up comments on them. He can be very negative, he was especially in the 80's, but on the whole I think he's a fan of their music. These are some I found searching the web:


Neil Tennant, quoted by Chris Heath not long after Rattle And Hum was released, saw it as something only loved by "ghastly rock purists... who want it to be like 1969 again", declaring that, "We hate it for exactly the same reasons Johnny Rotten said he hated dinosaur groups in 1976... it's stultifying, it says nothing, it is big and pompous and ugly."

"I think that there's music being made today that is pompous, but ultimately hollow. U2's songs don't say anything; they're posturing."

"In the week that George Bush was elected president, U2 was the No. 1 group in America. Millions of the people who bought Rattle and Hum then went out and voted for Bush, apparently seeing no contradiction. I think that may show the weakness of their message."

-

"Their album is produced by Daniel Lanois, Brian Eno and Steve Lillywhite! I can’t even work out how that all works! And then there’s the four of them!" he said. "I think with us, musically, it still has a freshness and energy about it and maybe it comes to us easier, in that sense."

"The thing with U2 is that they want to be the biggest group in the world and I applaud that but we’ve never really [wanted that]," he said. "And it’s not because we’re not ambitious because we are - we’ve had a lot of number one singles and probably more than U2 – but that [desire] is a rock thing, isn’t it?"

-

"[In the '90s] there were lots of pop musicals, so it felt like a bit a cliché to work in that, though really most of those are just catalog musicals.

"There's just Elton John, and Boy George, and Bono and The Edge, who are having a rather ghastly time in New York at the moment. I'm sure they're discovering that when you start to write musicals it's a lot more difficult than you might have thought, because your music has got to work theatrically.

"I think we're lucky that we can write music theatrically. It's very difficult for rock music. There's been a lot of debate over this, saying that rock music doesn't work because the rhythmic dynamic of it is not particularly flexible."

-

"I've always been against the idea of rock stars lecturing people as if they know something the rest of us don't - it looks arrogant.

"It's not as if they have a private source of information. To state the obvious as if you are the only person that knows it is intellectually weak. Like Bono - he uses his celebrity, but in doing so he increases his celebrity. I'm never even totally convinced that the rest of U2 feel comfortable with that."

-

"We were at Elton's house in the South Of France," he grins, "and Bono and his wife came round to dinner. We wondered how he was going to be because we had done a slightly satirical version of Where The Streets Have No Name. Bono is quite obsessed about the difference between rock and pop. We were in the '80s, but we kind of grew out of it.

"There was a lot of drinking going on so when Bono jumped into the pool from Elton's terrace, I thought, 'I can't let him get away with that' and jumped in after him. He said, 'OK, it's Rock 1, Pop 1', but I think he's much more competitive than I am. It wasn't a typical evening at Elton's. Elton doesn't usually stay up that late."
I was about to say "But they covered Streets..." and then read the "slightly satirical" comment. I never knew that. It's a great cover.

Offline This Dave

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #22 on: April 10, 2014, 10:58:19 PM »
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I do find all these opinions really interesting. But most of them where uttered more than 10 years ago. By that time, U2 were actually the best band in the whole universe, you could say they have the audience wrapped around their finger.
What I would love is to read/listen to some other points of view from the Vertigo era until now, this year. At any rate, whatever that Gallagher thinks about U2, I just don't care. He's disgusting, to say the least, I never liked him at all, I won't take his comments, taking into account they are coming from an insanity virtuoso.
You're thinking of Liam, not Noel, I assume?

Liam's quotes are meaningless. He's made a career out of saying stuff to get a media reaction. You might as well be quoting what a professional wrestling character says about their scripted opponent as if it were a real thing.

Offline Gypsy Heart

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2014, 11:04:44 PM »
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I do find all these opinions really interesting. But most of them where uttered more than 10 years ago. By that time, U2 were actually the best band in the whole universe, you could say they have the audience wrapped around their finger.
What I would love is to read/listen to some other points of view from the Vertigo era until now, this year. At any rate, whatever that Gallagher thinks about U2, I just don't care. He's disgusting, to say the least, I never liked him at all, I won't take his comments, taking into account they are coming from an insanity virtuoso.
You're thinking of Liam, not Noel, I assume?

Liam's quotes are meaningless. He's made a career out of saying stuff to get a media reaction. You might as well be quoting what a professional wrestling character says about their scripted opponent as if it were a real thing.

I couldn't agree more. That's why I named him an insanity virtuoso.

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2014, 06:49:43 AM »
Brandon Flowers in 2008...

Flowers wants his band to be the biggest in the world. He has, he confesses, "a drive bordering on obsession". He talks about bumping U2 off their pedestal. "They're unbelievable but they're getting old. It feels like it's time."

Time to release Battle Born and render that statement MEANINGLESS, Brandon? huh?

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2014, 06:52:58 AM »
And this from 1997 era Damon Albarn... in Request Magazine

Albarn:
Well, no U2 would be all right if it wasn't for Bono. He ruins everything. I feel really sorry for the Edge because he comes up with some quite tasteful stuff.
Malkmus:
Yeah he's an original guitarist for sure.
Albarn:
Let's not forget that Bono was a born again Christian only 10 years ago.
Malkmus:
Was he really?
Albarn:
Yeah. And he writes crap lyrics. But I've never liked him, though - that comes from when I was a barman at a hotel and he was really snotty to me.
Malkmus:
You do hold a grudge!
Albarn:
I totally do. I'm very bad like that. I never ever forget. I just wait. I bide my time. Then I strike. Oh yes.

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2014, 06:56:06 AM »
And one of my favourites that involves a few...

Daniel Johns (Silverchair), Peter Garrett (Midnight Oil, but at this time  Federal MP - or Congressman for you seppos), Natalie Imbruglia (that chick who sang 'Torn') and Bono

Quote
Sometimes a damaging political story can be nipped in the bud even before the news cycle has taken so much as a quarter turn.

Take today’s fleeting allegation that ALP Shadow Minister Peter Garrett had once smoked a joint with Silverchair’s Daniel Johns and, ahem, U2’s Bono.

It all started with Johns being interviewed on the Triple J Breakfast show this morning (listen to the interview here):

He [Bono] buzzed me over to the house that he was staying at in Sydney and asked if I’d play the demos and it was really one of the most surreal moments in my life. It was me and Natalie and Peter Garrett and Bono laying on Bono’s bed smoking joints listening to Young Modern demos.

Young Modern, the latest Sliverchair album, was released in March this year. Which likely places the alleged bed-lounging-spliff-sharing incident around November last year, when U2 was playing in Sydney.

At the time, Garrett was shadow parliamentary secretary for reconciliation and the arts.

By late morning, a chastened Johns had taken it all back, citing the ”just kidding” defence:

”In an interview I did this morning on Triple J I made a stupid joke. It’s just been brought to my attention that some people in the media have taken my dumb joke seriously so I want to set the record straight. At no time have I ever “smoked a joint” with Bono or Peter Garrett. They are both well known to be very anti-drugs so that’s why I assumed everybody would know I was joking when I made that comment. Clearly that wasn’t the case and I feel sick that I might have caused embarrassment to two people who I admire so much.

”I was fortunate enough to once get to play them some of my demo’s but I swear that no joints were involved. I guess I felt a bit like a namedropper mentioning them on the radio so that’s why I added a silly throwaway joke. I accept that drug use is no laughing matter and I apologize sincerely for any confusion or harm I’ve caused. Just by the way, this is one of the reasons why I hate doing interviews. I really should just shut up and stick to singing.”

Garrett’s office had no further comment.

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2014, 06:56:35 AM »
and you so know they were smoking weed....

Offline Edgematic

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2014, 09:05:52 AM »
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Who: George Harrison, Beatles
When: 2001
What he said: "Look at a group like U2. Bono and his band are so egocentric - the more you jump around, the bigger your hat is, the more people listen to your music. The only important thing is to sell and make money. Today there are groups who sell lots of records and then disappear. The Beatles had a value which will last forever". Will we remember U2 in 30 years?  I doubt it

Harrison said this in 1997 during the Popmart tour, which makes the "Big Hats" comment make more sense.  Bono responded somehow in a controversial manner, but I forget how, exactly.

Offline u2live

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Re: Other rock stars views of U2
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2014, 09:27:08 AM »
He gave G. HARRISON the finger at a concert I believe ........