Author Topic: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014  (Read 9138 times)

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Offline SlyDanner

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2015, 03:27:01 PM »
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The music world was different back in the 70's/80's. Rock bands didn't need a number 1 hit to be huge. How many number 1's did stadium bands like Led Zeppelin or the Who have? How many number 1's did hard rock bands who could sell out arena's like Aerosmith, Kiss, Rush, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, etc have?

Rock bands didn't need hit singles back then. U2 had big songs that anyone who listened to FM radio or watched MTV would have heard. Every teenager knew who sang Sunday Bloody Sunday, Pride, and New Years Day. They may not have been number 1's but they were still very popular. U2, like many other rock bands, could play arena's without having hit singles.
They were hugely popular. I came to U2 via a fantastic modern rock radio station on Long Island, one of the first of its kind in the nation. I actually got upset in the aftermath of The Joshua Tree, when some "normal" I knew from work heard me talking about U2 and proclaimed, "U2 rocks!" Ugh. Mainstream fans. Who needs 'em. ;)

JHook - was it WLIR?  It was, wasn't it?  ;D

I grew up in NY area and listened to it all the time.  This station brought us lots of bands, The Cure, INXS, The Cult etc etc etc

MaryC - just to point out what others have said - U2 were huge in the 80s.  I don't know what the pop charts did then - I did not pay attention then and of course not now.  But U2 were EVERYWHERE.

Offline JHook

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2015, 06:55:03 PM »
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The music world was different back in the 70's/80's. Rock bands didn't need a number 1 hit to be huge. How many number 1's did stadium bands like Led Zeppelin or the Who have? How many number 1's did hard rock bands who could sell out arena's like Aerosmith, Kiss, Rush, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, etc have?

Rock bands didn't need hit singles back then. U2 had big songs that anyone who listened to FM radio or watched MTV would have heard. Every teenager knew who sang Sunday Bloody Sunday, Pride, and New Years Day. They may not have been number 1's but they were still very popular. U2, like many other rock bands, could play arena's without having hit singles.
They were hugely popular. I came to U2 via a fantastic modern rock radio station on Long Island, one of the first of its kind in the nation. I actually got upset in the aftermath of The Joshua Tree, when some "normal" I knew from work heard me talking about U2 and proclaimed, "U2 rocks!" Ugh. Mainstream fans. Who needs 'em. ;)

JHook - was it WLIR?  It was, wasn't it?  ;D

I grew up in NY area and listened to it all the time.  This station brought us lots of bands, The Cure, INXS, The Cult etc etc etc

MaryC - just to point out what others have said - U2 were huge in the 80s.  I don't know what the pop charts did then - I did not pay attention then and of course not now.  But U2 were EVERYWHERE.

It was WLIR! It was! OMG, I miss that station so deeply. Saw some great bands at Jones Beach, went dancing at the Malibu, among other places. U2 was ubiquitous!

Offline Mary C

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #47 on: January 09, 2015, 11:23:03 AM »
Apparently you guys didn't read my post. My whole post was about that very point!  You didn't need to top the Billboard Hot 100 b/c there was extensive club, college radio, and concert scene where anyone could go b/c of cheap tickets. And most importantly, this support network for artists was still largely untouched by corporate conglomerates, it was still "homegrown." Didn't you read my descriptions?

How else do you think a 10-yr-old girl discovered U2 in 1982?  By listening to her parents' stations?! I was too young to have taken in the full glory of the music scene then. I only had my college radio station from Vermont to plug into it. Couldn't go to clubs, had to sneak downstairs in the wee hrs of the morning to watch MTV. I even missed U2 when they played an outdoor gig at the SUNY campus on the War tour, my parents wouldn't even have taken me even though it was only 10 minutes drive away. (they'd heard me singing SBS once too often and thought U2 were a bunch of deviants. LOL!) Thank God for my local bookstore, I could read Musician and Rolling Stone to my heart's content.

Yes, U2 were huge. I know that. The whole point of my post was contrasting the music scene then and now for any possible younger fans reading this. Now that support network is no longer there for artists, it's been largely neutered and slowly swallowed up by a combo of corporate absorption and the Net. So now it's much harder for artists to break through and sustain superstardom. The Hot 100 is all there's left, to break through the noise. And now, when practically every major artist has a clothing or perfume line.... God. it's worse than the 50's pre-Elvis, it's come full freaking circle. I understand where the band is coming from. They didn't need to be obsessed with having a huge hit then b/c they were everywhere else.

IMO the whole thing started in the early 90's when a lot of non-Top 40 stations began to be labeled 'alternative rock" stations. Alternative to what? If you were a college radio station playing Nirvana when the mainstream stations played Micheal Jackson, you were already "alternative." Why the further nichification? And then the 2nd wave of grunge bands, the post-grunge acts who came along in the mid-90's (Pumpkins, etc...) they all disappeared en masse by the early 2000's. Even a great band like Live. Suddenly there were Disney stations everywhere. MTV stopped playing music videos, and I don't think it was because there wasn't an audience for rock music anymore. Was this decision made b/c of file sharing? Why did a great band like the Smashing Pumpkins, whose 2nd album sold over 10 million copies, and had no problem with the idea of being famous, suddenly find itself promoting its new album with a tour of not arenas or stadiums but *shopping malls*? I remember when they played a show in the lobby of my mall. And we all asked WHY? Why did the industry no longer support these great bands but instead  threw all it marketing muscle behind the Backstreet Boys? I don't blame the 1999-2001 Great Implosion just on Napster.

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2015, 05:17:41 PM »
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This is just an aside... but I always really wanted to see the album version performed live.  I remember watching it on Letterman and thinking it could have been made into something.

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Not my favorite song, but when U2 are really trying and throwing themselves into something there is always that little spark of magic.  :)

It just sounds so twee and almost like a U2 parody. For a long-time band to try and peak peoples attention, the worst thing you want to do is show people that you are doing the same kind of stuff they might remember from before, only not as good. Chiming delay-heavy guitars leading to big emotional chorus. I give Bono all the credit for the way he performs it towards the end, with the big chorus almost connecting with the crowd.

The live remix was much better, if only because once it got towards the end it moved away from the original song enough to allow them to weave Frankie Goes To Hollywood and Discotheque into it, then move away from the original song altogether.

Offline tom_b1807

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #49 on: January 12, 2015, 12:06:16 PM »
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JHook, I know you were one of the 80's fans.  I love your posts BTW. And probably most of the people posting here were too. I'm writing for the benefit anyone on here who might be a younger or a new fan. I'm holding out hope that some of those may be lurking here.

And now enough of my blather for today:)

And ps. I'll write shorter posts from now on.

I'm lurking, don't worry! Whilst I don't really know any hardcore U2 fans my age, I do have a few 'casual' ones (mostly down to me I would like to think), including one who can't stop humming Mysterious Ways (something also down to myself, as he likes to remind me!)

I would like to think there are other U2 fans of a similar to my age and I pity the ones that haven't heard their music!

Offline Clarky

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #50 on: January 16, 2015, 06:57:04 PM »
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Yeah, I dislike that U2 tends to run away from failed albums. NLOTH was 3 songs away from being a masterpiece, and they had those three songs in their posession.

My NLOTH dream tracklisting:

1 Soon
2 NLOTH
3 Magnificent (Bono's 2010 world cup version)
4 Moment of Surrender
5 Unknown Caller
6 Winter (Linear version)
7 Mercy (Original Version with new scrubbed lyrics)
8 Breathe
9 Being Born
10 White as snow
11 Cedars of Lebanon

They could have given us an EP with Stingray Guitar, North Star, GOYB, SUB, Ill go crazy, or put them on a deluxe edition, but not on the main album....

Something like this....I mean, NLOTH has the makings of a stellar album. Sure they missed the boat on 2 or 3 songs, but my god, it's FAR from being a poor album.

Offline Parsons

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Re: Larry's comments in MOJO Magazine December 2014
« Reply #51 on: January 16, 2015, 07:11:18 PM »
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Yeah, I dislike that U2 tends to run away from failed albums. NLOTH was 3 songs away from being a masterpiece, and they had those three songs in their posession.

My NLOTH dream tracklisting:

1 Soon
2 NLOTH
3 Magnificent (Bono's 2010 world cup version)
4 Moment of Surrender
5 Unknown Caller
6 Winter (Linear version)
7 Mercy (Original Version with new scrubbed lyrics)
8 Breathe
9 Being Born
10 White as snow
11 Cedars of Lebanon

They could have given us an EP with Stingray Guitar, North Star, GOYB, SUB, Ill go crazy, or put them on a deluxe edition, but not on the main album....

Something like this....I mean, NLOTH has the makings of a stellar album. Sure they missed the boat on 2 or 3 songs, but my god, it's FAR from being a poor album.
+1 Been saying this for years IMHO U2 has never made a poor album.