Author Topic: Have U2 become all about the money?  (Read 12030 times)

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The Jackal

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #105 on: June 28, 2015, 03:09:15 PM »
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Here is the opening night of the elevation Tour..

Elevation Tour

Main Set
Elevation
Beautiful Day
Until The End Of The World
New Year's Day
Stuck In A Moment You Can't Get Out Of
Gone
Discotheque, Staring At The Sun (snippet)
New York
I Will Follow
Sunday Bloody Sunday, Get Up Stand Up (snippet)
Sweetest Thing
In A Little While
The Ground Beneath Her Feet
Bad
Where The Streets Have No Name
Mysterious Ways
The Fly
Encore
Bullet The Blue Sky
With Or Without You
One
Walk On

Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

This Elevation set has a better encore than SoI but the rest of the SoI show looks more exciting on paper.

 

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #106 on: June 28, 2015, 03:47:54 PM »

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Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

Indeed. For those of us who've seen them over the past 20+ years, we can almost play the game of "guess which two songs from UF you'll probably hear tonight" (or three from AB, or three to four from JT, or two from War, etc.), and be right about 90% of the time.

The Jackal

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #107 on: June 28, 2015, 03:54:01 PM »
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Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

Indeed. For those of us who've seen them over the past 20+ years, we can almost play the game of "guess which two songs from UF you'll probably hear tonight" (or three from AB, or three to four from JT, or two from War, etc.), and be right about 90% of the time.


The mark of a band on autopilot when playing their oldies.


Offline The Exile

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #108 on: June 28, 2015, 05:08:13 PM »
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Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

Indeed. For those of us who've seen them over the past 20+ years, we can almost play the game of "guess which two songs from UF you'll probably hear tonight" (or three from AB, or three to four from JT, or two from War, etc.), and be right about 90% of the time.


The mark of a band on autopilot when playing their oldies.

If 1/3 of the set is from the new album, then I am quite pleased given how long U2 has been doing this. My only quibble is that the other 2/3 of the set which are hits should be drawn from their entire catalog in a more balanced way (which is not the case now). Also, throw in a couple deep cuts like you did on 360 (like TUF and UV).

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #109 on: June 28, 2015, 05:12:55 PM »

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Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

Indeed. For those of us who've seen them over the past 20+ years, we can almost play the game of "guess which two songs from UF you'll probably hear tonight" (or three from AB, or three to four from JT, or two from War, etc.), and be right about 90% of the time.


The mark of a band on autopilot when playing their oldies.

If 1/3 of the set is from the new album, then I am quite pleased given how long U2 has been doing this. My only quibble is that the other 2/3 of the set which are hits should be drawn from their entire catalog in a more balanced way (which is not the case now). Also, throw in a couple deep cuts like you did on 360 (like TUF and UV).

To be fair, I fully understand the band isn't going to stuff a set list full of rarities just to pease those of us who've seen them every tour since Zoo TV....there's simply no market in doing that, and millions of attendees would be upset at not hearing the hits. But I do think one or two tracks could be played for the die-hards, a la UV and TUF on 360.

The Jackal

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #110 on: June 28, 2015, 05:22:59 PM »
Let's be quite frank, what are the essential Greatest Hits that have to be played for the casual fans?

Streets
WOWY or One
Pride
SBS
ISHFWILF
BD (to represent the modern era)

And really that's it.  So in a 23 song setlist in which they play seven new songs (not obligatory btw) and the six above mentioned songs that leaves ten other songs from their back catalogue that they can freely pick and choose.  It doesn't have to be The Fly, MW, Bullet, NYD, UTEOTW, I Will Bloody Follow, Elevation, Bad, Vertigo, COBL.  The casual fans won't really miss them to be honest.

Like I said it's just a sign that the band are on autopilot when it comes to playing their oldies, as if to say because we play plenty of new songs we are allowed to be lazy with our oldies.  Basically what The Exile said.

 

« Last Edit: June 28, 2015, 05:25:19 PM by The Jackal »

The Jackal

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #111 on: June 28, 2015, 05:35:37 PM »
A Day Without Me
Tomorrow
Drowning Man
Indian Summer Sky
Wire
Exit
Hawkmoon
God Pt II
Acrobat
Wild Horses
Dirty Day
Please
Mofo

Come on they are ALL doable.


Offline rlabs19

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #112 on: June 28, 2015, 06:34:09 PM »
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A Day Without Me
Tomorrow
Drowning Man
Indian Summer Sky
Wire
Exit
Hawkmoon
God Pt II
Acrobat
Wild Horses
Dirty Day
Please
Mofo

Come on they are ALL doable.

Especially the bolded. Please even fits the theme of the show perfectly.

Offline Blueyedboy

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #113 on: June 29, 2015, 01:52:34 PM »
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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

I agree totally. I get to see quite a few bands and some of the best shows I've seen over the past couple of years have cost around 15 or less (Exit Calm cost 8 for a great show albiet in a tiny venue).

For the 1st time since Zooropa '93 I have decided that enough is enough with the ticket prices. It's not a case of what I can afford, but with having children it becomes more and more difficult to justify the cost of watching a show with a set list that hasn't changed that much in the past decade.
Here is the opening night of the elevation Tour..

Elevation Tour

Main Set
Elevation
Beautiful Day
Until The End Of The World
New Year's Day
Stuck In A Moment You Can't Get Out Of
Gone
Discotheque, Staring At The Sun (snippet)
New York
I Will Follow
Sunday Bloody Sunday, Get Up Stand Up (snippet)
Sweetest Thing
In A Little While
The Ground Beneath Her Feet
Bad
Where The Streets Have No Name
Mysterious Ways
The Fly
Encore
Bullet The Blue Sky
With Or Without You
One
Walk On

Now if you factor in that SOI is a new album they are playing and that is taking up around a quarter of the setlist, there is a fair bit of repetition on the rest of the set from that night 14 years ago and what is being played now.

That's just depressing. It's the sort of static set list that they can only get away with due to the length of time between tours.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2015, 12:01:08 AM by Blueyedboy »

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #114 on: June 30, 2015, 12:50:25 AM »
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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

You know you could have paid $300 dollars to a ticket reseller and gotten GA. I've been able to get GA to every U2 tour since Elevation, the only problem was getting inside the inner circle on the Vertigo Tour.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #115 on: June 30, 2015, 12:53:58 AM »
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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

I agree totally. I get to see quite a few bands and some of the best shows I've seen over the past couple of years have cost around 15 or less (Exit Calm cost 8 for a great show albiet in a tiny venue).

For the 1st time since Zooropa '93 I have decided that enough is enough with the ticket prices. It's not a case of what I can afford, but with having children it becomes more and more difficult to justify the cost of watching a show with a set list that hasn't changed that much in the past decade.

There are $30 dollar tickets and $65 dollar tickets available for the shows. You don't have to buy the expensive tickets. The $65 dollar tickets get you on the floor closest to the band. There are also $65 dollar tickets in the stands as well.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #116 on: June 30, 2015, 12:59:10 AM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$

The majority of tickets sold can be resold in various ways. Again, the majority of the tickets sold at these shows are at the $95, $65, and $30 prices. An the the number of normally priced $275 tickets outnumber the VIP packages and other stuff. These form the majority of the tickets available and they can all be purchased on ticketsnow.com a ticket reseller site. Check it out!

But if there are no block sales at all and only people who purchased the, say, max 4 tickets per person per show from one official seller can actually get through the admission gates, how do the scalpers go about selling tickets?

Multiple buyers, multiple credit cards, plus the number of scalpers naturally increases when the price is well below market value. Yes, each individual scalper may be somewhat limited in the money they can make, but they could still make several hundred dollars EACH easily. You could have several thousand scalpers buying up the tickets and reselling them to the real fans at their true market value.

Are the scalpers going to give each buyer of their tickets the credit card that was used to purchase the tickets originally?

They just give them the hard ticket or the E-ticket to print out.

But the primary buyer (scalper) will have used a different cc to buy the official ticket than the secondary buyer will present along with their ticket at the admission gate.

I've never been to a concert where I had to present a credit card. Hard tickets and E-tickets are resold for concerts every day.

Offline Blueyedboy

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #117 on: June 30, 2015, 03:19:26 AM »
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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

I agree totally. I get to see quite a few bands and some of the best shows I've seen over the past couple of years have cost around 15 or less (Exit Calm cost 8 for a great show albiet in a tiny venue).

For the 1st time since Zooropa '93 I have decided that enough is enough with the ticket prices. It's not a case of what I can afford, but with having children it becomes more and more difficult to justify the cost of watching a show with a set list that hasn't changed that much in the past decade.

There are $30 dollar tickets and $65 dollar tickets available for the shows. You don't have to buy the expensive tickets. The $65 dollar tickets get you on the floor closest to the band. There are also $65 dollar tickets in the stands as well.

Money is not the sole issue in making my point, its the expectation that we get to pay a premium for a show that we have seen many times over in terms of content. The wrapping paper may be different but its the music what stays the same apart from the promo material for the new album at the time.

Offline Johnny Feathers

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #118 on: June 30, 2015, 06:31:07 AM »

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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

You know you could have paid $300 dollars to a ticket reseller and gotten GA. I've been able to get GA to every U2 tour since Elevation, the only problem was getting inside the inner circle on the Vertigo Tour.

So it's my fault for not gaming the system. Fair enough. Hell, I bought into U2's fan club for the privilege of buying 300-level tickets for Vertigo. I wanted GA, and that's what I got. Ah well.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #119 on: June 30, 2015, 08:20:46 AM »
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My two cents:

Like it or not, the market seems to largely support the high ticket prices. The only alternative is simply not to go. Someone else will likely buy those tickets.

That said, I speak from experience: high ticket prices and big name concerts bring out the worst "fans" you could want. While I had to take a deep breath to pay $300 to see them, many of the people around me couldn't have cared less about the prices, or the show. People talking throughout the whole show, arriving drunk, being belligerent, starting fights, being kicked out for smoking, arriving late and leaving early....these are people who are only there because it's the "thing to do", or are there because of corporate gifting. All of that behavior happened in my section, within a few rows.

Sadly, it's not a trend I see changing soon. As I said to my gf during one of the many distractions around us, "don't worry, I'm sure the Blu-Ray will be great." Of course, if I want to get in with the true fans, I need to get GA (which I've never been able to do in the past), wait in long lines, and be prepared to have no seat. I settled for my one show this tour, and that was it. All I can say is, when I saw Zoo TV, I paid, at the most, $32, and had 2nd row seats. The higher costs these days have no reflection on how good of a show it is by comparison, I can tell you that.

You know you could have paid $300 dollars to a ticket reseller and gotten GA. I've been able to get GA to every U2 tour since Elevation, the only problem was getting inside the inner circle on the Vertigo Tour.

So it's my fault for not gaming the system. Fair enough. Hell, I bought into U2's fan club for the privilege of buying 300-level tickets for Vertigo. I wanted GA, and that's what I got. Ah well.

That happened to me too on the Vertigo tour. Demand was out of site, and it was the first time U2 had used the new fan club system. I was able to get GA though on the 2nd leg through a friend.  GA was generally easy to get through the fan club in 360 because there were so many more available tickets, an average of 10,000-15,000 Stadium vs 2,000 for the arena shows. Arenas are harder to get GA, but paid up fan club member since 2005 should be able to get GA has they go in first during the pre-sale phase of buying tickets. So things are much better for fan club members, provided you stayed with the fan club over the years and never left.