Author Topic: Have U2 become all about the money?  (Read 11875 times)

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Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #30 on: June 21, 2015, 05:25:03 PM »
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I still haven't come down from the three shows in Montreal either, and yes the ages ranged from very young and older and everything in between. My opinion if you love something so much you will pay for it. I am by no means rich.the contrary, but for me the money was worth every penny to me because I love this band so much it is worth it to me.

I'm thrilled that your still on a high from the show. But why is it that U2 can't be more fair with the ticket prices? Loving something and "paying" more money for it really have no correlation at all. Because their are plenty of people out there who may love the band but can't go to shows without shelling out $300 a ticket, and  they simply can't !! That's a shame when it really does't have to be that way!

1. A minority of the tickets for U2 shows are sold at $300 dollars or higher

2. The majority of the tickets to U2 shows are sold at $95, $65, and $30 dollars list price before adding service charges.

3. Some U2 shows that have not soldout have still had $95 and $65 priced tickets available at show time. So there are indeed tickets available at the lower end for people who want to go to the show.

4. U2 is a business just like Pearl Jam is a business. Both bands charge what they are worth in the market. U2 is worth more in the market than Pearl Jam and charge more on average because of that.

Good points, my only challenge is on point 4. I don't see 300 tickets being representative of market value in the current climate. My fear is that the price is an attempt to dictate the market value by pricing out the common U2 fan in favor of a more corperate audience.

There are thousands of normal average U2 fans who actually prefer to purchase $300 dollar tickets. Why? First, these are fans that want a fixed, reserved seat. The best, fixed reserved seats that are the closest proximity to the stage are the $300 dollar tickets. So there are fans that will buy them. Many U2 fans own business's or sit at or near the top of the largest companies in the world. $300 dollars is the market value for a particular type of seat at a U2 concert. If that was not the case, no one would purchase these seats.

I'll have to respectfully disagree, I doubt very much that an average U2 fans preference would be to pay $300 dollars over a $60 ticket (which should also guarantee a reserved seat).
With regards to the comment that many U2 fans sit at the top of the largest companies in the world or own their own businesses, well I'll have to take your word on that but it most certainly doesn't justify pricing the average fan out of the market.

No one has been priced out of the market. Once again, the majority of tickets are at the $95, $65, and $30 dollar price. The better the seat, the more demand for and there for the more expensive it is. That's normal market practice. No one complained about paying $275 for tickets on the 360 tour which was in massive football stadiums where the seats are further away from the stage than in a basketball arena. So why complain about $300 dollar seats in a basketball arena on this tour? Plus if you want to get close to the band, just go General admission and you could possibly touch Bono, get within a few feet, or get up on stage, for only $65 dollars a ticket. U2 is actually losing money on those General Admission tickets and those that scalp General Admission tickets are selling them for 6 or 7 times face value. The cheapest General Admission ticket on up to be resold by a scalper on ticketsnow.com for the first Madison Square Garden show is selling for $465 dollars!


Offline So Cruel

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #31 on: June 21, 2015, 09:05:34 PM »
Of course the bands view on money has changed. On Zoo TV they famously wouldn't increase ticket prices by $5 to ensure a profit. Now the top seats went for over $600 in Vancouver. A pretty clear change for anyone to see.

Offline mdmomof7

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #32 on: June 21, 2015, 09:48:07 PM »
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Of course the bands view on money has changed. On Zoo TV they famously wouldn't increase ticket prices by $5 to ensure a profit. Now the top seats went for over $600 in Vancouver. A pretty clear change for anyone to see.

Those $600 seats come w/ many desirable perks, so it's not just a seat. The top seat, just a seat, are the $312 seats in the prime viewing zones.

Offline Tuolumne

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #33 on: June 21, 2015, 10:34:11 PM »
There are a lot of easier ways to make a lot of money than what U2 are doing on this tour. Especially since they all already have what I presume to be a sufficient amount of millions each already. Stock market, business investments, etc.   

Offline summerrain

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #34 on: June 21, 2015, 10:52:47 PM »
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Of course the bands view on money has changed. On Zoo TV they famously wouldn't increase ticket prices by $5 to ensure a profit. Now the top seats went for over $600 in Vancouver. A pretty clear change for anyone to see.

Yep, and then they realized that they almost went bankrupt and they didn't want to go through that again

LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #35 on: June 22, 2015, 03:23:20 AM »
No different from they ever were.

PatateTony35

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #36 on: June 22, 2015, 08:21:49 AM »
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I still haven't come down from the three shows in Montreal either, and yes the ages ranged from very young and older and everything in between. My opinion if you love something so much you will pay for it. I am by no means rich.the contrary, but for me the money was worth every penny to me because I love this band so much it is worth it to me.

I'm thrilled that your still on a high from the show. But why is it that U2 can't be more fair with the ticket prices? Loving something and "paying" more money for it really have no correlation at all. Because their are plenty of people out there who may love the band but can't go to shows without shelling out $300 a ticket, and  they simply can't !! That's a shame when it really does't have to be that way!

1. A minority of the tickets for U2 shows are sold at $300 dollars or higher

2. The majority of the tickets to U2 shows are sold at $95, $65, and $30 dollars list price before adding service charges.

3. Some U2 shows that have not soldout have still had $95 and $65 priced tickets available at show time. So there are indeed tickets available at the lower end for people who want to go to the show.

4. U2 is a business just like Pearl Jam is a business. Both bands charge what they are worth in the market. U2 is worth more in the market than Pearl Jam and charge more on average because of that.

Good points, my only challenge is on point 4. I don't see 300 tickets being representative of market value in the current climate. My fear is that the price is an attempt to dictate the market value by pricing out the common U2 fan in favor of a more corperate audience.

There are thousands of normal average U2 fans who actually prefer to purchase $300 dollar tickets. Why? First, these are fans that want a fixed, reserved seat. The best, fixed reserved seats that are the closest proximity to the stage are the $300 dollar tickets. So there are fans that will buy them. Many U2 fans own business's or sit at or near the top of the largest companies in the world. $300 dollars is the market value for a particular type of seat at a U2 concert. If that was not the case, no one would purchase these seats.

I'll have to respectfully disagree, I doubt very much that an average U2 fans preference would be to pay $300 dollars over a $60 ticket (which should also guarantee a reserved seat).
With regards to the comment that many U2 fans sit at the top of the largest companies in the world or own their own businesses, well I'll have to take your word on that but it most certainly doesn't justify pricing the average fan out of the market.

No one has been priced out of the market. Once again, the majority of tickets are at the $95, $65, and $30 dollar price. The better the seat, the more demand for and there for the more expensive it is. That's normal market practice. No one complained about paying $275 for tickets on the 360 tour which was in massive football stadiums where the seats are further away from the stage than in a basketball arena. So why complain about $300 dollar seats in a basketball arena on this tour? Plus if you want to get close to the band, just go General admission and you could possibly touch Bono, get within a few feet, or get up on stage, for only $65 dollars a ticket. U2 is actually losing money on those General Admission tickets and those that scalp General Admission tickets are selling them for 6 or 7 times face value. The cheapest General Admission ticket on up to be resold by a scalper on ticketsnow.com for the first Madison Square Garden show is selling for $465 dollars!

Somehow I bought a GA for Mtl 1 for 20$ under the face value the night of the show. Maybe Bono called for God that evening.

Offline BalconyTV

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #37 on: June 22, 2015, 08:25:29 AM »
Some basics folks...

2/3 months ago... there were plenty of tickets going around. I posted that you could get tickets for as low as 40 bucks on Stubhub.

At that time there was a hullabaloo about U2 not being able to sell out shows.

But as the tour kicked in and the reviews have came in, the tickets have sold more. And the only ones left are very expensive.

Supply and demand.

If you got in early, you could have got a more than reasonable ticket.

You can't complain a couple of weeks pre concert.

I wanted to go see Noel Gallagher in New York a couple of weeks back. Tickets were sold out and extremely expensive on Stubhub.

Pearl Jam may have a mixed crowd, but its got nothing to do with price structure. Because like any concert, once the tix start selling out, the prices just go up. I can't see how its different for Pearl Jam.

I would say - 1/ Pearl Jam don't sell out... and/or 2/ Pearl Jam are just cooler for the kids at the mo than U2. Which I think is reasonable.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2015, 08:49:52 AM »
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Of course the bands view on money has changed. On Zoo TV they famously wouldn't increase ticket prices by $5 to ensure a profit. Now the top seats went for over $600 in Vancouver. A pretty clear change for anyone to see.

I've never heard that before at all. Do you have a link from an official source for that? Based on the cost of the ZOO TV tour, figures from Carter Alan's book and figures reported by USA TODAY, the band did indeed make a profit when cost are compared to the gross, despite claims to the contrary by band and management. There were all kinds of various ways U2 was making a profit in 1992, from album sales, various merchandise in addition to ticket sales. I can't find any point in U2's history where the band were not interested in making a profit or maximizing their profits. In fact, the only exception would be now with how they price General Admission tickets.

Offline Mr. Red

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #39 on: June 22, 2015, 10:27:23 AM »
The NY, Chicago, etc. markets never had the price structure that was referenced in a previous post ($95, $60, or whatever). They were grossly overpriced from the beginning, face value. And I'm not referring to the after market here. As far as all the Pearl Jam references, there are so many inaccuracies with these posts I don't even know where to begin. Pearl Jam always and consistently charge the usual "going rate" for their shows. Not some ridiculous and abusive tiering system of $300 for "better seats" with the likes of Lady Gaga and Maddona!! And to think that ticket prices do not affect the people who go to shows is simply putting your head in the sand. Again, I cannot speak to the other markets as far as U2 is concerned where tickets are under $100. To also think that Pearl Jam would not sell out their shows, especially over seas is also silly. They have a tremendous following worldwide. So the supply and demand argument is dead when it comes to Pearl Jam. They set their price, and that is it!! They never ever take advantage of bigger markets to suck in more profits form their fans. The price is the price.  I won't even get into how Pearl Jam has kept it real for all these years and hands down, treat their fans top notch, through and through. Ticket prices, live bootleg downloads of all their shows, top notch fanclub with presale tickets, etc.  Having been an original fan club member of Propaganda magazine, no one knows better than I do how U2 completely disregarded us when they went with the internet fan club!! But that's a post for a whole other day!!

LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #40 on: June 22, 2015, 10:32:06 AM »
I kinda agree with Paul McGuinness: it's impolite to talk about money.


Offline BalconyTV

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #41 on: June 22, 2015, 11:24:54 AM »
Mr. Red... you're probably right on various points regarding Pearl Jam. And to be clear, I am not knocking Pearl Jam... or anything like that. And with that, it is unquestionable that U2 could do things better...

HOWEVER

Pearl Jams 2014 Lightning Bolt tour had 20 dates and was attended by 264,000 people.

Thats 13,200 people on average per concert.

The tour grossed 18,700,000... (that puts the average ticket price at 70 bucks (not exactly a save the world price)

The average attendance of each U2 concert so far has been 35,000 per night (don't ask me how they do that, but thats whats been published). I presume with GA, and full arena seats.

So the fact is, the demand to see U2 is just much larger, anyway you look at it. U2 can afford to price tier. U2 can price 13,200 seats reasonably... and stagger upwards from there.

Other artists don't have that demand, and thus ticket prices have to be lower.

The fact is, many artists just don't sell out these days. I was at an Arcade Fire gig recently... lots of empty seats. Muse, half empty... etc etc. These are the bands of the day. They have to charge 60 bucks... because if they didn't... the venues would have even more empty seats.

If Pearl Jam could sell 35,000 tickets a night, I'm sure they would. But as they can't the tickets are priced appropriately.

I think you are a touch romantic about things. I don't believe Pearl Jam are on a charitable conquest as noble as they are.

As a side point, the average ticket price for U2360 was 100 bucks.

This was all a bit rambly... but I think some kinda point is coming out.

Offline Mr. Red

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #42 on: June 22, 2015, 11:48:39 AM »
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Mr. Red... you're probably right on various points regarding Pearl Jam. And to be clear, I am not knocking Pearl Jam... or anything like that. And with that, it is unquestionable that U2 could do things better...

HOWEVER

Pearl Jams 2014 Lightning Bolt tour had 20 dates and was attended by 264,000 people.

That's 13,200 people on average per concert.

The tour grossed 18,700,000... (that puts the average ticket price at 70 bucks (not exactly a save the world price)

The average attendance of each U2 concert so far has been 35,000 per night (don't ask me how they do that, but that's whats been published). I presume with GA, and full arena seats.

So the fact is, the demand to see U2 is just much larger, anyway you look at it. U2 can afford to price tier. U2 can price 13,200 seats reasonably... and stagger upwards from there.

Other artists don't have that demand, and thus ticket prices have to be lower.

The fact is, many artists just don't sell out these days. I was at an Arcade Fire gig recently... lots of empty seats. Muse, half empty... etc etc. These are the bands of the day. They have to charge 60 bucks... because if they didn't... the venues would have even more empty seats.

If Pearl Jam could sell 35,000 tickets a night, I'm sure they would. But as they can't the tickets are priced appropriately.

I think you are a touch romantic about things. I don't believe Pearl Jam are on a charitable conquest as noble as they are.

As a side point, the average ticket price for U2360 was 100 bucks.

This was all a bit rambly... but I think some kinda point is coming out.

Some good points, and yes I guess I can be a bit romantic about things. I totally get the whole supply and demand aspects you described. Something just doesn't sit well with me with regards to U2's whole corporate thing. To a degree, it zaps my enthusiasm for the band just enough where it's sometimes difficult to swallow. Again, I have followed the band my entire life and have seen them all around the world. But of late, the things they can do better just bothers me too much and thus, I continue to gravitate towards a band like Pearl Jam as an example in the second half of my life.  Thanks for the therapy session Ha!!

Offline SlyDanner

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #43 on: June 22, 2015, 11:56:17 AM »
Seems like this thread has evolved to focus just on the ticket prices again, but the OP question I think is a larger one.  'All about the money' has wider implications, for example the Apple release, the type of music the band are making, desire to be on the radio, risk taking (or aversion), etc etc.

I actually don't have too many problems with U2 as a business, including tour pricing.  What does irk me is the overly commercial stunts like the iTunes giveaway, and the incessant delays on every release as the band tries to get the formula exactly right for a big hits mega-album, which hasn't really worked since 2004. 

In the end, the business side should be in the background, not the foreground.  IMO.

Offline The Exile

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #44 on: June 22, 2015, 12:14:28 PM »
Call me an over-simplifier, but I think that anyone who already has tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and is still trying to make more, is greedy by definition (whether they're a rock singer or a CEO).