Author Topic: Have U2 become all about the money?  (Read 11998 times)

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LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #75 on: June 23, 2015, 03:41:10 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$


Offline an tha

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #76 on: June 23, 2015, 03:43:49 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

I have to be honest and say I'm not close enough to what goes on but why on earth would ticketmaster charge a 50 service fee, their job is to sell tickets and I have bought tickets for shows to see bands from them that were less than 50 and paid a minimal booking fee.

Unless I am missing something of course then fair enough, as I say I'm not that close to what happens.

As for the touts they have always been there and will sell tickets for what people will pay, but often they get burned and end up giving them away I've picked up tickets to see U2 for twenty quid outside a venue right on show time from touts.....face value way above. I am sure they fleeced mugs earlier in the day for hundreds but if they still have them left they'll sell them for whatever they can get come showtime.

Online has changed the dynamics I suppose with the legalised touting in effect.

Still cant convince me that they should be charging more than 50 nicker.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #77 on: June 23, 2015, 03:44:59 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

So we're meant to be thankful that is U2 who are making an excessive profit at our expense rather than the scalpers? That's like asking the cops to rob our houses just to cut out the middle man!

Second point, it's the buyer who dictates the purchase price, not the seller. If the house didn't sell then it is priced wrong, the same goes for tickets.

You don't have to buy U2 tickets. If you think U2 tickets are overpriced why would you buy them? U2 make the money they make because of the CHOICE of millions of individuals to purchase tickets, albums and merchandise. The MARKET not the buyer or seller decides what a product or service is worth.

99% of U2 tickets have been sold which shows they priced the tickets correctly.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #78 on: June 23, 2015, 03:47:06 PM »
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This is not accurate. The majority of the MSG and Chicago tickets were/are north of $200. Even if you look now, the Chicago tickets for level 300 is $95 without fees!!!

It always cracks me up when defenders of U2's ticket pricing cite the relatively small handful of cheap tickets in GA as evidence of than band caring about affordability, when in fact the large majority of ticket prices for each show are quite expensive.  I guess it's all part of the band's strategy and PR spin.

The Average Ticket price for the first 11 shows of this tour based on the boxscore results is only $116.21. That shows that the majority of the tickets were priced at the lower tier prices instead of the $275 and up prices.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #79 on: June 23, 2015, 03:51:05 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$

The majority of tickets sold can be resold in various ways. Again, the majority of the tickets sold at these shows are at the $95, $65, and $30 prices. An the the number of normally priced $275 tickets outnumber the VIP packages and other stuff. These form the majority of the tickets available and they can all be purchased on ticketsnow.com a ticket reseller site. Check it out!

LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #80 on: June 23, 2015, 03:55:49 PM »
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This is not accurate. The majority of the MSG and Chicago tickets were/are north of $200. Even if you look now, the Chicago tickets for level 300 is $95 without fees!!!

It always cracks me up when defenders of U2's ticket pricing cite the relatively small handful of cheap tickets in GA as evidence of than band caring about affordability, when in fact the large majority of ticket prices for each show are quite expensive.  I guess it's all part of the band's strategy and PR spin.

The Average Ticket price for the first 11 shows of this tour based on the boxscore results is only $116.21. That shows that the majority of the tickets were priced at the lower tier prices instead of the $275 and up prices.

I have a feeling that U2 like having us Brits over without a pillow.  I'm in the upper tier, so high up in fact that the new fangled speakers could almost be my personal headphones, and they charged me - with a straight face - 90 ($140+) excluding booking fees.




LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #81 on: June 23, 2015, 03:58:46 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$

The majority of tickets sold can be resold in various ways. Again, the majority of the tickets sold at these shows are at the $95, $65, and $30 prices. An the the number of normally priced $275 tickets outnumber the VIP packages and other stuff. These form the majority of the tickets available and they can all be purchased on ticketsnow.com a ticket reseller site. Check it out!

But if there are no block sales at all and only people who purchased the, say, max 4 tickets per person per show from one official seller can actually get through the admission gates, how do the scalpers go about selling tickets?

 
« Last Edit: June 23, 2015, 04:00:27 PM by LemonadeSupernova »

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #82 on: June 23, 2015, 04:00:24 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

I have to be honest and say I'm not close enough to what goes on but why on earth would ticketmaster charge a 50 service fee, their job is to sell tickets and I have bought tickets for shows to see bands from them that were less than 50 and paid a minimal booking fee.

Unless I am missing something of course then fair enough, as I say I'm not that close to what happens.

As for the touts they have always been there and will sell tickets for what people will pay, but often they get burned and end up giving them away I've picked up tickets to see U2 for twenty quid outside a venue right on show time from touts.....face value way above. I am sure they fleeced mugs earlier in the day for hundreds but if they still have them left they'll sell them for whatever they can get come showtime.

Online has changed the dynamics I suppose with the legalised touting in effect.

Still cant convince me that they should be charging more than 50 nicker.

Ticketmaster's goal is to sell as many tickets as possible at their TRUE MARKET VALUE. If the artist underprices the ticket, ticketmaster will make a lot of that up in the service fee and it will not hurt ticket sales because the overall price is still at or slightly below market value. If ticket master does not do this, then scalpers will make a killing.

U2 always charges market value which limits the number of scalpers who buy tickets and attempt to resell them for a profit. If U2 went back to Joshua Tree era ticket price of $20 dollars, Tens of Thousands of people would be diving in to the market to make money. Buy a 20 dollar ticket and then you can resell it for a $100 easy! Its a scalpers dream or any business mans dream to be making a 400% profit off your investment.

The MARKET and only the market decides what the price should be. My idea or your idea about what is supposedly "fair" is irrelevant. Try it with anything else and see if you can get that service or product for less than half of its true market value.

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #83 on: June 23, 2015, 04:02:36 PM »
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This is not accurate. The majority of the MSG and Chicago tickets were/are north of $200. Even if you look now, the Chicago tickets for level 300 is $95 without fees!!!

It always cracks me up when defenders of U2's ticket pricing cite the relatively small handful of cheap tickets in GA as evidence of than band caring about affordability, when in fact the large majority of ticket prices for each show are quite expensive.  I guess it's all part of the band's strategy and PR spin.

The Average Ticket price for the first 11 shows of this tour based on the boxscore results is only $116.21. That shows that the majority of the tickets were priced at the lower tier prices instead of the $275 and up prices.

I have a feeling that U2 like having us Brits over without a pillow.  I'm in the upper tier, so high up in fact that the new fangled speakers could almost be my personal headphones, and they charged me - with a straight face - 90 ($140+) excluding booking fees.

Perhaps the average price is higher for the UK shows. Only the first 11 US shows have been reported so far. Remember, you are seeing them in a relatively tiny 20,000 seat arena. Imagine where you could be sitting in a 90,000 seat stadium if they had chosen to play Wembley?

Offline wolf

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #84 on: June 23, 2015, 04:05:54 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$

The majority of tickets sold can be resold in various ways. Again, the majority of the tickets sold at these shows are at the $95, $65, and $30 prices. An the the number of normally priced $275 tickets outnumber the VIP packages and other stuff. These form the majority of the tickets available and they can all be purchased on ticketsnow.com a ticket reseller site. Check it out!

But if there are no block sales at all and only people who purchased the, say, max 4 tickets per person per show from one official seller can actually get through the admission gates, how do the scalpers go about selling tickets?

Multiple buyers, multiple credit cards, plus the number of scalpers naturally increases when the price is well below market value. Yes, each individual scalper may be somewhat limited in the money they can make, but they could still make several hundred dollars EACH easily. You could have several thousand scalpers buying up the tickets and reselling them to the real fans at their true market value.

LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #85 on: June 23, 2015, 04:06:12 PM »
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This is not accurate. The majority of the MSG and Chicago tickets were/are north of $200. Even if you look now, the Chicago tickets for level 300 is $95 without fees!!!

It always cracks me up when defenders of U2's ticket pricing cite the relatively small handful of cheap tickets in GA as evidence of than band caring about affordability, when in fact the large majority of ticket prices for each show are quite expensive.  I guess it's all part of the band's strategy and PR spin.

The Average Ticket price for the first 11 shows of this tour based on the boxscore results is only $116.21. That shows that the majority of the tickets were priced at the lower tier prices instead of the $275 and up prices.

I have a feeling that U2 like having us Brits over without a pillow.  I'm in the upper tier, so high up in fact that the new fangled speakers could almost be my personal headphones, and they charged me - with a straight face - 90 ($140+) excluding booking fees.

Perhaps the average price is higher for the UK shows. Only the first 11 US shows have been reported so far. Remember, you are seeing them in a relatively tiny 20,000 seat arena. Imagine where you could be sitting in a 90,000 seat stadium if they had chosen to play Wembley?

To be fair, I don't mind paying a premium to see them in an arena.  But the truth is that ticket prices in stadiums six years ago were just as pricey as the current tour.  This profit maximising ticket strategy has been going on for a long while now in the U2 camp. 


LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #86 on: June 23, 2015, 04:08:00 PM »
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Let's say the average crowd for this tour is 18,000.

They could charge 50 for every ticket in the arena and gross 900,000 per show.

Add in merchandise and that figure grows to a million easily don't know if they are on a share of the bar take or not.. ... and surely that is enough money made even allowing for their costs.....

But a U2 ticket is worth more in the market than $50 dollars, more than double that in fact. If U2 do not charge what they are worth, then scalpers and ticketmaster will! Every business around the world, large or small charges market value for their product or services. Home owners always charge market value when they sell their house.

I disagree, two hours of music isn't worth any more than 50, important difference here is pounds not dollars....so whatever 50 pounds is in dollars is the figure I am talking about...

U2 can price their gigs as they please of course, but as very, very wealthy men with a loyal fan base who have given them the great life Bono likes to refer to I reckon 50 would be a fair and reasonable price point.

I certainly wouldn't pay more personally.

U2 could price tickets at 50 pounds like you say, but then ticketmaster would come in with a 50 pound service fee or scalpers would dive in and charge whatever the market rate is supposed to be. Either way, the fans will be paying the market price, and people other than U2 will be taking half of the money. IF the artist does not charge what they are worth, ticketmaster and scalpers will then earn the rest. The fans will still be paying market price.

E-tickets bought from official site with CC to be presented at admission.  None-transferable.

No block sales to secondary market agents at all, including for so-called VIP packages.

Now what's the scalpers next move?  Seriously, educate me.  Of course the artists themselves are in cahoots with the secondary up-sellers. Why? $$$$

The majority of tickets sold can be resold in various ways. Again, the majority of the tickets sold at these shows are at the $95, $65, and $30 prices. An the the number of normally priced $275 tickets outnumber the VIP packages and other stuff. These form the majority of the tickets available and they can all be purchased on ticketsnow.com a ticket reseller site. Check it out!

But if there are no block sales at all and only people who purchased the, say, max 4 tickets per person per show from one official seller can actually get through the admission gates, how do the scalpers go about selling tickets?

Multiple buyers, multiple credit cards, plus the number of scalpers naturally increases when the price is well below market value. Yes, each individual scalper may be somewhat limited in the money they can make, but they could still make several hundred dollars EACH easily. You could have several thousand scalpers buying up the tickets and reselling them to the real fans at their true market value.

Are the scalpers going to give each buyer of their tickets the credit card that was used to purchase the tickets originally?


Offline an tha

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #87 on: June 23, 2015, 04:19:10 PM »
Wolf, you make interesting points and support then with a strong well put argument....

I'm not totally sure about how right you are, but you are more clued up on the subject than me so i am out the debate....

I'll not personally pay any more than 50 going forward though, it just isn't worth it to me and I do think U2 (like a lot of artists) are greedy.

Offline bonorules

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #88 on: June 23, 2015, 04:21:05 PM »
For the record, Ticketmaster does not set the price of the tickets.  The artist and show's promoter set the prices.  The fees TM charges are all set per the contracts they have with each arena.  Those fees are usually based on what the local market can handle and some are higher than others depending on if the arena gets a portion of the fee.  Even if they felt an artist really underpriced their event, TM would never tack on additional fees to 'make up' the difference.  They can only charge the fees approved in the contract with the arena.

LemonadeSupernova

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Re: Have U2 become all about the money?
« Reply #89 on: June 23, 2015, 04:25:57 PM »
Yeah, it's no good blaming TM for the high prices of U2 tickets.

FWIW, I'm content with what I paid for my ticket and I'm fairly content with my view of the show up in the gods.  Still, the tickets could very easily be a lot cheaper to make it more easily affordable for yer average U2 fan.