Author Topic: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America  (Read 6274 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tigerfan41

  • Child of Grace
  • **
  • Posts: 1,780
  • 2017 Concerts: Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2017, 11:33:43 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Quote
U2 were meant to tour this year but didn't have SoE polished enough to release

The SOE album and tour were meant to happen last fall (2016). And I fully believe the JT Tour 2017 is only happening because of contractual obligations.

Right, and that didn't happen last fall which meant they would have to tour in 2017. I don't disagree that U2 are doing TJT because of the LN contract, but I do disagree that they're being forced into it as some have implied. It sounds like more of a compromise with LN on their part than anything else, a way to feed the beast, so to speak.

I think their intention was to release SoE early in 2016 and continue the tour--all the interviews seem to suggest that they wanted to get SoE out there as close to SoI as possible. For whatever reason, that didn't happen, and here we are with a nostalgia tour and potentially a continuation of I&E + a new album, all within the span of less than a year. As a fan who wants to see them live as much as possible before they do hang things up, this isn't such a bad thing. I can see where other fans would be bothered by the nostalgia, though.

Offline The Edges Cat

  • Desert Rose
  • **
  • Posts: 2,101
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #61 on: March 23, 2017, 01:32:40 AM »
And I hope when I get old I don't sit around thinking about it
but I probably will ... glory days!


You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Happens to all of us. Heck, half the forum members are still reliving the glory days of Pop. ;)

Offline PopMart_1997

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 150
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #62 on: March 23, 2017, 07:10:36 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Aaand this is why people don't like Bono... are you an American Bono? Because last time I checked, you were Irish.
Hey, America is not the world.

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Yes, lol, I was intentionally quoting Morrissey... Although I am American, I think Moz does have a point.

As an American, I'm ashamed our country and our people weren't sharp enough (or even groovy enough) to appreciate PopMart.

Offline PopMart_1997

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 150
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #63 on: March 23, 2017, 07:41:15 PM »
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.

WookieeWarrior10

  • Guest
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #64 on: March 23, 2017, 07:48:42 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.

Offline PopMart_1997

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 150
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #65 on: March 23, 2017, 08:09:34 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.
If U2 were becoming a "heritage act", that would mean no recording/releasing any new albums or songs. Clearly U2 are still putting new stuff out, and NOT playing shows 100% devoted to "greatest hits". So, I don't buy that tag, its one created by close-minded people, ie. hipsters.

Offline Kmama07

  • Running to Stand Still
  • **
  • Posts: 1,186
  • She is everywhere and no place
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #66 on: March 23, 2017, 08:12:16 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.

I can't speak for anyone else but I get what you mean.  Being a fan who feels she grew up along with the band (pooled $ with my brother and bought October on cassette in 1981...still have the cassette) accepting U2 getting older means accepting I AM GETTING OLDER, too!  So many years and memories...entire periods of my life associated with different periods of their music. Truth be told, as much as I truly look forward to new music, I still cherish the old and look forward to seeing them for ANY tour.

Offline PopMart_1997

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 150
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #67 on: March 23, 2017, 08:17:11 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Truth be told, as much as I truly look forward to new music, I still cherish the old and look forward to seeing them for ANY tour.
This! ^

WookieeWarrior10

  • Guest
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #68 on: March 23, 2017, 08:58:59 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.

I can't speak for anyone else but I get what you mean.  Being a fan who feels she grew up along with the band (pooled $ with my brother and bought October on cassette in 1981...still have the cassette) accepting U2 getting older means accepting I AM GETTING OLDER, too!  So many years and memories...entire periods of my life associated with different periods of their music. Truth be told, as much as I truly look forward to new music, I still cherish the old and look forward to seeing them for ANY tour.
Then I guess that's something I don't understand, being a younger person.

Offline This Dave

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 772
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #69 on: March 23, 2017, 09:20:10 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
'blame' livenation for this IMHO...

i feel it is very clear that the main reason this thing is happening is because it is the compromise that the band reached with livenation as they wanted a payday as a part of the big deal they inked.

had u2 been more active over the last 6/7 years i have no doubt this wouldn't be happening.

Oh come on. Livenation needs a tour contractually? Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Songs of Experience tour.

The end

Not that simple is it....

Why not? If they owe LiveNation a tour, why can't they tour their new album? Did they sign some sort of agreement with LiveNation to do a Memberberries tour? If so, that's on U2. If not, then what does LiveNation have to do with this being JT tour?

Which would you guess makes more money, an arena tour or a stadium tour?

So U2 gave up the authority to decide when, how, and with what material they tour? If that's true, they have the most incompetent management in history.

Offline This Dave

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 772
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #70 on: March 23, 2017, 09:24:29 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.

Well it's already built into the equation that Joy Division is not an active band anymore, and if the Cure are still pushing new music, that hasn't been going well for 25 years now.

It's an apples to oranges comparison, at least to what U2 are supposed to be.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 09:28:48 PM by This Dave »

Offline This Dave

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 772
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #71 on: March 23, 2017, 09:26:56 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.

Not so much aging, but there has always been an agreement between the fans and the band that each time out is an honest attempt to make the best album or do the best tour they've done. This is a heritage act move. They CAN overcome the stigma of that, but will they try?

Offline This Dave

  • Numb
  • **
  • Posts: 772
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #72 on: March 23, 2017, 09:28:08 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Honestly, I don't get all the backlash from so-called "U2 fans" for the band celebrating The Joshua Tree on its anniversary by playing the entire album live. Pearl Jam played Ten in its entirety during their shows, nobody complains. The Cure played their trilogy of albums live -- Pornography, Disintegration, Bloodflowers -- and from what I understand no one was complaining about that. Even the Sex Pistols played Never Mind The bo****ks... live. (Ironically, its their only studio LP). Peter Hook, founding member of Joy Division and New Order, plays his band's albums live in their entirety just about  every night -- even the singles compilations... people say his band performs the material better than even New Order does now, and truthfully New Order doesn't even play the songs that fans want to hear, its what Bernard, being the diva he is, wants to play. And its roughly the same setlist for the past 15-20 years.

But, when U2 decides to play The Joshua Tree live in its entirety for a short tour while they finish their upcoming album, people complain!!!!!!

I just don't get why.

What is wrong with playing an album live??? That's something that 10-20 years ago, most artists never did, and people are so used to studio versions of select popular songs anyway. This is a pretty sweet concept, and yet people complain.
A large part of the reason is that the fans don't want to accept that U2 are getting older as a band... because tours like these are often associated with aging. For me, though, it's just that I don't want for U2 to go looking back into their past for inspiration. U2 have said themselves that they would not become a heritage act... but that feels exactly like what is happening now.
If U2 were becoming a "heritage act", that would mean no recording/releasing any new albums or songs. Clearly U2 are still putting new stuff out, and NOT playing shows 100% devoted to "greatest hits". So, I don't buy that tag, its one created by close-minded people, ie. hipsters.

Not really. Plenty of heritage acts release new albums as a pretense to tour, but nobody knows those songs and they aren't playing them.

Offline PopMart_1997

  • Stateless
  • *
  • Posts: 150
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #73 on: March 23, 2017, 09:35:18 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Well it's already built into the equation that Joy Division is not an active band anymore.
Yes, Joy Division isn't active anymore, but New Order still is. At least Hooky, and now U2, are doing something for their respective setlists that New Order would never do....

Offline tigerfan41

  • Child of Grace
  • **
  • Posts: 1,780
  • 2017 Concerts: Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit
Re: NPR: U2 on The Joshua Tree, a Lasting Ode to a Divided America
« Reply #74 on: March 23, 2017, 10:00:27 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Truth be told, as much as I truly look forward to new music, I still cherish the old and look forward to seeing them for ANY tour.
This! ^

Same! I would say I look forward to the tours more than the new albums these days. With how deep their discography already is, with how good their live shows are, any new album they release is more of a bonus than anything else.