Author Topic: Bringing a real camera.  (Read 4368 times)

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Offline Ginapier@msn.com

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Bringing a real camera.
« on: June 19, 2017, 05:24:14 PM »
I'll be in redzone in NJ on the 28th and want to take my Nikon p900. You just can't get good shots with the camera phone..

Question being, how bad is the bag search entering the arena? Do they give you a hard time if you have a good camera? The p900 is technically a coolpix with a mega zoom built in...looks like a dslr but isn't..

I've been seeing great shots posted on instagram and know they're not taken with an iPhone...curious if anyone could assist.



Offline dublinireland

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2017, 06:05:40 PM »
info should be/or will be posted on the stadium website. what's allowed etc.
Many have restrictions on certain cameras.

Offline haunted

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2017, 06:27:17 PM »
from MetLife's site:

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Handheld digital or film cameras, including Go Pro cameras, are permitted inside MetLife Stadium as long as their use does not interfere with other guests' enjoyment of the event. Tripods, monopods, "selfie sticks" and cameras with a lens longer than 6" (detachable or non-detachable) will NOT be permitted into stadium. Video cameras and video recording of events with other devices at MetLife Stadium are prohibited

Offline brupars

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2017, 06:38:47 PM »
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I'll be in redzone in NJ on the 28th and want to take my Nikon p900. You just can't get good shots with the camera phone..

Question being, how bad is the bag search entering the arena? Do they give you a hard time if you have a good camera? The p900 is technically a coolpix with a mega zoom built in...looks like a dslr but isn't..

I've been seeing great shots posted on instagram and know they're not taken with an iPhone...curious if anyone could assist.
  Superzooms have slow lenses. Especially in the Red Zone, you won't need that reach. Most venues are stating that you can bring P&S cameras that don't have detachable lenses. I have used a Canon Powershot S110 for my last three shows. Short zoom, but quality fast lens. F2 on the wide end, F5.9 on the long end. A true "shirt pocket" camera. The best solution seems to be a Sony A6300 or other 6000 series camera. Combine that with a 50mm F1.8 OSS lens and you've got an outstanding low light professional set up. From the Red Zone, you won't be shooting the main stage that well most of the time, but you will be killing it on the Tree Stage. Although these are detachable lens Sony's, I haven't heard of anyone having problem getting them in. 4k video to boot! Here are a few I got in Houston with the Canon. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Offline Ginapier@msn.com

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2017, 06:57:42 PM »
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I'll be in redzone in NJ on the 28th and want to take my Nikon p900. You just can't get good shots with the camera phone..

Question being, how bad is the bag search entering the arena? Do they give you a hard time if you have a good camera? The p900 is technically a coolpix with a mega zoom built in...looks like a dslr but isn't..

I've been seeing great shots posted on instagram and know they're not taken with an iPhone...curious if anyone could assist.
  Superzooms have slow lenses. Especially in the Red Zone, you won't need that reach. Most venues are stating that you can bring P&S cameras that don't have detachable lenses. I have used a Canon Powershot S110 for my last three shows. Short zoom, but quality fast lens. F2 on the wide end, F5.9 on the long end. A true "shirt pocket" camera. The best solution seems to be a Sony A6300 or other 6000 series camera. Combine that with a 50mm F1.8 OSS lens and you've got an outstanding low light professional set up. From the Red Zone, you won't be shooting the main stage that well most of the time, but you will be killing it on the Tree Stage. Although these are detachable lens Sony's, I haven't heard of anyone having problem getting them in. 4k video to boot! Here are a few I got in Houston with the Canon. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Your pictures are incredible! Phones can't duplicate that quality! Thanks for the response! I really wanted to take my P900 but I think the extreme zoom may be an issue..

Offline Ginapier@msn.com

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2017, 06:59:07 PM »
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from MetLife's site:

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Handheld digital or film cameras, including Go Pro cameras, are permitted inside MetLife Stadium as long as their use does not interfere with other guests' enjoyment of the event. Tripods, monopods, "selfie sticks" and cameras with a lens longer than 6" (detachable or non-detachable) will NOT be permitted into stadium. Video cameras and video recording of events with other devices at MetLife Stadium are prohibited

This is so helpful...thank you! No idea where you found it ....

Offline brupars

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2017, 08:52:24 PM »
Here's a set shot with the Sony a6300 + 50mm F1.8 OSS . You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
The Canon G Series cameras are another popular choice. The Sony has a big APS-C sensor which also helps image quality. I was told many years ago that the best zoom is your feet. In this context, that means get to the rail. That set was shot from the top of the Tree, so it's like shooting fish in a barrel. Tree stage lighting is brighter than main stage too.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 08:56:45 PM by brupars »

Offline d.darroch

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2017, 12:26:31 AM »
That's one hefty bridge camera Ginapier! I'd agree with brupars, a super-zoom is overkill for Red Zone. Yes, you'll be able to zoom in very close, & see Bono's whiskers when the band are on the main stage. But there will be problems, & I'm not just talking about the camera's bulk. Although the lighting at a U2 show is better than many concerts, it's still a low light environment. As there's movement you'll need a decently fast shutter speed, around 1/60s if you don't mind a little blur on Edge's guitar, or 1/125s for sharper photos. At this speed you'll need to up the sensor's sensitivity (ISO), or let more light on to the sensor. So what do you need in low light environments? A camera with a large sensor (to reduce noise at high ISO), & a fast (large aperture) lens, to let more light in. A super-zoom fails on both counts.

The way the optics work super-zooms must have tiny sensors. Yours is only 1/2.3", that's just about mobile phone size. Much smaller than the sensor for a MFT or APS camera, much much smaller than a DSLR.
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With this sensor size image quality will drop off quite rapidly as the ISO increases. ISO 400 is probably acceptable, 800 maybe borderline, 1600 is likely to be rubbish.

The p900 has a monster zoom, but it's slow (small aperture). An aperture ranging from f/2.8 when wide open, to f/5.9 when fully zoomed. f/5.9 is very small, it actually lets in less than 1/8th the light of a f/2.0 lens.

So really the p900 isn't a great choice for a concert environment. You don't have any other "real" cameras do you? Could you beg, borrow or steal one? For GA I'd try take something pretty small, like a mirrorless micro four third or APS camera, or an advanced compact. DSLR's are too unwieldy for my liking.

My choice is a Panasonic GM5, a tiny MFT camera. If I'm going to shoot photos I pair it with a tiny pancake prime lens, which is 40mm (35mm equivalent), & f/1.7, so lets in a lot of light. Not much reach at that focal length, so I've got to get close. If I'm shooting video I pair it with a tiny pancake zoom, which is 24-64mm (35mm equivalent). Not a huge range, but enough when you are close. This lens is much slower, f/3.5-5.6. But I can get away with it as when shooting video shutter speed can be slower (1/50s) & with a larger sensor I can shoot at ISO 800 no worries. I'd love a faster zoom, like the 24-70mm f/2.8, but it's a fair bit bigger & much more expensive.

Whatever you choose to do, don't shoot in auto. That's one of the problems with camera phones. Not just small sensors, people are shooting in auto. The camera doesn't know you're at a concert, so tries to brighten up all that black background. Photos will be totally blown out, as you can see in many people's pics, overexposed ghosts! At a minimum, dial exposure compensation down to -3. But shooting in manual mode is a much better option.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 01:27:58 AM by d.darroch »

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2017, 03:52:37 AM »
Super zoom is a waste. Nice and close with a fast lens and a big sensor is the answer to every single concert photography question.

So what others said.

Offline Ginapier@msn.com

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2017, 07:08:54 PM »
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That's one hefty bridge camera Ginapier! I'd agree with brupars, a super-zoom is overkill for Red Zone. Yes, you'll be able to zoom in very close, & see Bono's whiskers when the band are on the main stage. But there will be problems, & I'm not just talking about the camera's bulk. Although the lighting at a U2 show is better than many concerts, it's still a low light environment. As there's movement you'll need a decently fast shutter speed, around 1/60s if you don't mind a little blur on Edge's guitar, or 1/125s for sharper photos. At this speed you'll need to up the sensor's sensitivity (ISO), or let more light on to the sensor. So what do you need in low light environments? A camera with a large sensor (to reduce noise at high ISO), & a fast (large aperture) lens, to let more light in. A super-zoom fails on both counts.

The way the optics work super-zooms must have tiny sensors. Yours is only 1/2.3", that's just about mobile phone size. Much smaller than the sensor for a MFT or APS camera, much much smaller than a DSLR.
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With this sensor size image quality will drop off quite rapidly as the ISO increases. ISO 400 is probably acceptable, 800 maybe borderline, 1600 is likely to be rubbish.

The p900 has a monster zoom, but it's slow (small aperture). An aperture ranging from f/2.8 when wide open, to f/5.9 when fully zoomed. f/5.9 is very small, it actually lets in less than 1/8th the light of a f/2.0 lens.

So really the p900 isn't a great choice for a concert environment. You don't have any other "real" cameras do you? Could you beg, borrow or steal one? For GA I'd try take something pretty small, like a mirrorless micro four third or APS camera, or an advanced compact. DSLR's are too unwieldy for my liking.

My choice is a Panasonic GM5, a tiny MFT camera. If I'm going to shoot photos I pair it with a tiny pancake prime lens, which is 40mm (35mm equivalent), & f/1.7, so lets in a lot of light. Not much reach at that focal length, so I've got to get close. If I'm shooting video I pair it with a tiny pancake zoom, which is 24-64mm (35mm equivalent). Not a huge range, but enough when you are close. This lens is much slower, f/3.5-5.6. But I can get away with it as when shooting video shutter speed can be slower (1/50s) & with a larger sensor I can shoot at ISO 800 no worries. I'd love a faster zoom, like the 24-70mm f/2.8, but it's a fair bit bigger & much more expensive.

Whatever you choose to do, don't shoot in auto. That's one of the problems with camera phones. Not just small sensors, people are shooting in auto. The camera doesn't know you're at a concert, so tries to brighten up all that black background. Photos will be totally blown out, as you can see in many people's pics, overexposed ghosts! At a minimum, dial exposure compensation down to -3. But shooting in manual mode is a much better option.

Wow! You are quite knowledgeable about cameras..I appreciate you taking the time to post this.. I must admit, reading this felt A bit foreign. I was excited to use my p900 thinking the zoom would be great...I used the p610 at one of the I&E shows at Madison square garden and while I was in sec. 100 the pics and videos were amazing so I assumed, the much improved p900 would be nice to have.

I have. A Nikon D500 but it's bulky too and a bunch of various smaller Nikon coolpix cameras as well but they aren't great for concerts...I actually work at Nikon HQ (in finance) and could "borrow" a camera but I just wanted something of good quality and easy to use...

Ultimately, the iPhone just can't give you the quality of a real camera...

Thanks again!

Offline Ginapier@msn.com

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2017, 07:10:27 PM »
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Here's a set shot with the Sony a6300 + 50mm F1.8 OSS . You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
The Canon G Series cameras are another popular choice. The Sony has a big APS-C sensor which also helps image quality. I was told many years ago that the best zoom is your feet. In this context, that means get to the rail. That set was shot from the top of the Tree, so it's like shooting fish in a barrel. Tree stage lighting is brighter than main stage too.

Amazing pics! You are quite the photographer! Thanks for sharing!

Offline jenniferh aka jen

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2017, 07:31:44 PM »
iPhone is terrible in low light and I also have issues with the band glowing white under certain spotlight conditions. Stick with a real camera.

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2017, 08:11:57 PM »
Pick up a Canon SX280hs or similar camera and use that for photos from GA at concerts. It's small enough that no venue will ban it, but has an expanding lens that takes great shots from far away. See here for some shots I took at a recent U2 concert: You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I would not bring a camera with a huge lens (like a DSLR) to GA. Not only will it get tiring holding it all night, but it will probably annoy the people around you.

Offline briscoetheque

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2017, 08:39:05 PM »
Borrow a d800 or similar and put a 50mm 1.8 on it.

Offline tigerfan41

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Re: Bringing a real camera.
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2017, 02:47:06 PM »
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Borrow a d800 or similar and put a 50mm 1.8 on it.

I'm still waiting to get my first DSLR. Want one, just can't justify the expense quite yet. That one looks nice, though.