Author Topic: Bono's interview in The Guardian :"Western world turning its back on HIV fight"  (Read 737 times)

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Offline BlueSquirrel

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Reporter Larry Elliott is in Davos and has interviewed Bono (or has been to a press conference where Bono and Christine Lagarde were, I don't know).
As a philanthropist, Bono spoke of HIV, developing countries and the state of capitalism:
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Offline laoghaire

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China's "investments" in Africa are worrisome. They are purely exploitative. They are not building anything of value and are crushing the local people along the way.

I don't know if Western investment is the answer. It would honestly be exploitative, too, but not nearly so much.

I am curious to know more about how he changed his mind on the IMF.

He is quite the diplomat, brokering relationships and understanding between opposing sides. I know people miss his righteous anger, and it did have value, but this is the next step. Angry words won't stop the fight.

Offline laoghaire

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Also, to the reporter: It's AIDS, not Aids. Autoimmune Deficiency Syndrome.

Offline noelle510

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Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndome

Offline laoghaire

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I deserved that.

Offline 73October

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Bono is totally right.
For every kid that gets something like meningitis in the developed world, there are several getting AIDS in the developing world.  And we have the drugs to stop meningitis being the killer it once was.  But they don't always have the drugs (although with Bono, and others', help is there and available - in places).

Bono has been a personal inspiration to me in terms of approaching healthcare and treatments - and although I'm not looking specifically at AIDS/HIV - I'm struck with the technological advances in diagnostics and treatments.
There was a kid on our regional news this week.  He's having proton beam therapy for a brain tumour.  The first treatment centre has been opened on the NHS in the UK, and this kid was filmed in the therapy room looking at the equipment he was going to be experiencing.  I was so excited to be seeing this news.
When I was a kid, I had brain and abdominal scans.  I think it was a CT scan rather than an MRI, but can't specifically remember.  All I remember was that it was claustrophobic and seemed noisy.  Big deal?  But when these machines were only just coming onto the wider market in the UK, it was a deal because I had to travel to a specific hospital to have the scan - and I'd never seen anything like it, this big object with a hole in it.  It was so different to an x-ray machine....(there was no internet back then).
So while the latest U2 show got me thinking about my childhood experiences of the radiology department, I realised that we have so much when a kid in a developing country can't even get access to a basic x-ray machine for a chest x-ray to examine the extent of their TB.
Don't even get me on to the fact that a pregnant women in rural parts of the developing world can't have an ultrasound to see if the baby is healthy.  That's so unequal!  And ultrasound machines are portable now.

So what am I doing about this?  I wanted to train in healthcare (radiographer) and I'm being cautious because there are a whole load of issues in my country to do with funding a university course and also funding the NHS.  I don't wish to be a nurse and it is not clear if there is extra money to fund radiographers.
So I might see if I can use the theology training I have and go down the spirituality/ethics and healthcare (development/management) route.  I can do this whilst working if I pick the right course.
My country might be looking in on itself now, but I realised how fortunate we are compared to some countries.  If only people could see.

Offline laoghaire

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It IS crazy. I was in Tanzania a while back. I saw several people with huge goiters. I didn't even know what they were; I'd literally never seen someone's neck look like a softball was wedged inside. This doesn't need to happen.

We have the treatments to make HIV nearly dormant. And prevent transmission most of the time.

"Where you live shouldn't decide whether you live or whether you die."