Author Topic: Where The Streets Has No Name  (Read 2008 times)

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Offline fresno dave

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2019, 09:08:48 PM »
Great version, I hadn't heard that version.
Wow, what a lyric to flub;; the opening line of Streets!  I get a kick of how he tries to cover/recover with the next line.

Here's the video, start at 2 hour 9 min mark. 
Watch his face when he realizes
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Offline Karmamalaga

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2019, 03:45:59 PM »
The best vesrion ever is the original one, in my opinion. Add to that, that it was my first U2 live song experience back on June 6th 1987. I haven't checked out the version at stake. Will do!

Offline Karmamalaga

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2019, 04:04:36 PM »
Well, this was a true disapointment to me. First, he forgot the lyrics, then, went all over the place. Interesting! Each to yheir own, I guess.

Offline ian ryan

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2019, 10:49:04 PM »
The juxtaposition between how invigorating the music is and how fatalistic and destructive the lyrics are has always amazed me about this song. It's a song about an apocalypse, about the cities flooding and love turning to rust, yet in the end the narrator still just wants to go somewhere with a special partner/friend/whatever. On this version Bono sings "Where the streets have no faith, where the streets have no love, where the streets have no name." This is a song about destruction, about rust and flood and poison rain and the hurricane and burning things down. Yet musically, it's utterly invigorating. It's an amazing song. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Offline Tortuga

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2019, 04:06:28 PM »
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The juxtaposition between how invigorating the music is and how fatalistic and destructive the lyrics are has always amazed me about this song. It's a song about an apocalypse, about the cities flooding and love turning to rust, yet in the end the narrator still just wants to go somewhere with a special partner/friend/whatever. On this version Bono sings "Where the streets have no faith, where the streets have no love, where the streets have no name." This is a song about destruction, about rust and flood and poison rain and the hurricane and burning things down. Yet musically, it's utterly invigorating. It's an amazing song. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I think that’s why so many people interpret “the place where the streets have no name” as being the afterlife (heaven).  The easiest way to make sense of what you point out is to view it like one of the old slave spirituals like the “jubilees” that were about deliverance from their situation.  It makes sense in that context...”I’ll show you a place high on a desert plain”....”when I go there I go there with you”.  That’s what the music sounds like.  The desert is similar to the River Jordan in the spirituals, symbolizing the point beyond where the suffering will end.


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Offline hotty375

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2019, 09:46:06 AM »
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The best vesrion ever is the original one, in my opinion. Add to that, that it was my first U2 live song experience back on June 6th 1987. I haven't checked out the version at stake. Will do!

Gothenburg? The keyboard sequencing is all out of sync at the end--you can hear Bono saying' no way' on the audio. Which was a shame as they had a wee mini-documentary about the gig:

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Haven't found part 2 yet . At least you got to hear it on the original JT tour unlike me lol ( 2 gigs and Stand by Me intro--aargh!!) ;D ::)

Offline laoghaire

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2019, 10:15:48 AM »
Oh boy, song analysis. Who am I to resist throwing in my tuppence?

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The juxtaposition between how invigorating the music is and how fatalistic and destructive the lyrics are has always amazed me about this song.

I hear something similar, but with one difference. The music, agreed, is invigorating. It's expansive. It pushes. It's not a cute little dance number, in some ways it can even be grim in its doggedness. But it is inspiring.

I think that quality exists in the rhythm section, especially in the bass. Adam's notes are simple eighths, no melody inside it, only chord changes. Just doggedly pushing forward. And the rhythm of it is specifically running. Those notes are feet on pavement, going, going, going.

Backing up a bit, the opening synth to me is a sunrise. As the sun rises, it gets more intense, and rays start bursting out from the horizon. It is the dawn of a new day, and it's the sound of hope. I like to think U2 sees it that way too, as they use the red backdrop for it, light the color of sunrise.

Against the backdrop of hope, Edge's opening chimes are joy put through an amp. The chimes build up to his unique jangly chords.

Then we start the run. Feet on pavement. You'd think that buildup would be all they could wring out if it, but Larry give us more with his drum fills ending with a cymbal clash, boom, we're not just running but we've hit our wind (and will not grow weary).

So that's the music. The lyrics, though, I see a little differently. He sings of destruction but I hear, not fatalism, but joy growing out of the pain.

I can't really get around U2 lyrics without addressing the Christian context. That juxtaposition, I hear it not between the music and the lyrics, but inside the lyrics as between our limited, flawed, mortal humanity and God's perfect, eternal love.

We humans build cities but they won't last. A major civilization lasts for hundreds of years - a thousand or two at very most.

Our love turns to rust, we are beaten then blown by the wind. That's humanity.

But the hope we hear in the music is in the lyrics, too: there is a place where we will be made whole again. And as weak and flawed as we are, we can hope that by grace we will get there too. It's all we can do.

Offline Argo

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Re: Where The Streets Has No Name
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2019, 11:00:08 PM »
My go to version is Zoo TV Sydney and the transition from RTSS to Streets is tingling. Slane Castle going from All I Want Is You into Streets is awesome too. So many great versions of it.