Author Topic: U2's Pop Single Edits/"Best of" Remixes: Improvements Over the Originals?  (Read 2183 times)

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Offline miryclay

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Re: U2's Pop Single Edits/"Best of" Remixes: Improvements Over the Originals?
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2019, 07:44:21 AM »
Nobody picked Velvet Dress Live with Jools

Offline pan360

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Re: U2's Pop Single Edits/"Best of" Remixes: Improvements Over the Originals?
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2019, 04:29:59 AM »
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Nobody picked Velvet Dress Live with Jools

I love it! It sounds like a totally different song..

Offline laoghaire

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Re: U2's Pop Single Edits/"Best of" Remixes: Improvements Over the Originals?
« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2019, 08:39:35 PM »
Billy Rhythm, thanks for that list because I will be checking out those live performances, like San Diego.

I noticed your list doesn't include Rotterdam. May I recommend that version of Discotheque? Here is a great enhanced audio of that performance, and I believe it blows the others away:

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Offline PapaPOP

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I have never really understood why the band has such a problem with or dislike of Pop. The songs rarely feature in concert. The issues with being rushed, too many cooks, Mullen's back injury etc. are all well known among U2 fans, but IMO, diamonds need pressure and heat to form, and I still think Pop is their greatest record.

The various remixes of key songs are interesting in their own right, but the album stands on its own as a fantastic achievement IMO.

Offline zooguitar

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I have a working theory as to why they diss Pop so much, in comparison to an album like Rattle and Hum, which was not even as critically well received upon initial release.

I suspect there was a lot of hard partying during that period, and not just infamously Adam. I think they're maybe a little weary of looking back fondly what was clearly a pretty druggy period for them (think of the first half on E, and the second half chain smoking spliffs). I think perhaps Bono had a particularly nasty experience after dropping E (note I've never taken E, in large part because I've read that a huge depressive episode is the most common after effect). The album musically/lyrically follows this to the dark end at "Wake Up Dead Man".