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51
Fun and Games / Re: 4 word U2 story
« Last post by CaraRR on March 13, 2019, 04:33:55 PM »
where they saw her
52
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Tortuga on March 13, 2019, 03:49:24 PM »
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I could care less if my favorite band is in the top 40.  And I'm definitely not saying that something can't be good if it's not on the top 40.  I'm just saying there isn't any rock on the top 40 anymore.  This might be the first time since Elvis that months can go by without what one would term a "rock" band being in the top 40.

I have a 20-year-old son.  He and all of his friends pretty much exclusively listen to hip hop.  He and his current roommates occasionally listen to rock, but it's all rock from 25-55 years ago.  I realize that's just a small subset in my corner of the globe.  But I think that's more the norm then the exception. 

So when I say something about "the denouement of rock," that's what I'm personally talking about.  It's funny how some people in the year 2019 seem to act like it's This Week's Big Secret when they see a phrase like "rock is dead."  For sure there's still a few good, new songs out there, but compared to 1991?  If you're someone who thinks rock and roll is alive and well and just as vital in the public consciousness now than it ever has been before, well more power to you.       

I donít disagree with what you are saying when you explain what you mean by its ďdeathĒ.   I guess I just accept that as the normal course of things and I donít worry about it.

When I see these comments I just want people to know there is as much good new rock music as there has ever been.  It makes me sad to think they are glum with the loss of new music just listening to the same old records over and over because they donít know how much great new rock is on Spotify, etc.  Thatís why I respond this way when people say rock is dead.  I find more great rock music now than I ever did in high school.  Thatís exciting.






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53
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Vox on March 13, 2019, 03:16:57 PM »
I could care less if my favorite band is in the top 40.  And I'm definitely not saying that something can't be good if it's not on the top 40.  I'm just saying there isn't any rock on the top 40 anymore.  This might be the first time since Elvis that months can go by without what one would term a "rock" band being in the top 40.

I have a 20-year-old son.  He and all of his friends pretty much exclusively listen to hip hop.  He and his current roommates occasionally listen to rock, but it's all rock from 25-55 years ago.  I realize that's just a small subset in my corner of the globe.  But I think that's more the norm then the exception. 

So when I say something about "the denouement of rock," that's what I'm personally talking about.  It's funny how some people in the year 2019 seem to act like it's This Week's Big Secret when they see a phrase like "rock is dead."  For sure there's still a few good, new songs out there, but compared to 1991?  If you're someone who thinks rock and roll is alive and well and just as vital in the public consciousness now than it ever has been before, well more power to you.       

54
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Tortuga on March 13, 2019, 02:48:01 PM »
Yeah, none of that popular zeitgeist stuff matters to me.  I don't care what other people are listening to.  It doesn't make me like a song more if a bazillion other people like it.

I think if you zoom out a little further you will find that this does happen every generation or two.  My parents grew up listening to big band music and had no use for Rock.  I grew up listening to rock and could care less about Jay Z.  It does pretty much happen to every generation.  I feel like everyone is just more aware of the loss of their own cultural thing.

As for thinking the quality of today's music is less than 1991...are you sure you aren't confusing popularity with quality?  REM seemed so great partly because so many people thought it was great.  Now lots of people think "today's" music is great.  Does that really make it great?  If so, shouldn't we all be listening to that instead of pining for the lost glory days of when rock was the pop culture king?

One thing different in the world of streaming is you aren't having the same song force fed to you over and over the way it was when it was on the radio.  You have to give music time to grow on you.  Alot of people miss that in the streaming world.  They listen a bit and nothing catches their fancy with one listen.  Then they say yeah there's alot of music but none of it is any good.

That's what's good about Spotify's curated lists, which cover every genre imaginable with new music being added all the time.  You can listen to the same playlist repeatedly like your listening to the radio.  The bad thing about it is you are back to subjecting yourself to one person's taste in music, just like in the old days.
55
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Vox on March 13, 2019, 02:26:46 PM »
"If what you mean by "death" is diminished popularity in mainstream culture then I have no argument with you there.  I just don't think that is a very meaningful way to determine the livelihood of something.  That's more like being sad because culture has moved on from what was popular when you were young.  That's been happening to everyone since forever."

Yes -- that's exactly what I'm talking about. 

Music tastes change, absolutely.  But what I'm talking about here, what I'm defining as "rock," is the line from Elvis Presley, to the Beatles, to Led Zeppelin, to U2, to Nirvana, to the Killers, and all those things in between.  I think what you're inferring as far as tastes changing is like someone listening to R.E.M. in the late '80s and being sad it doesn't sound like Crosby, Stills, and Nash from the early '70s.  But what I'm talking about is someone sitting around listening to late '70s Led Zeppelin and being sad it doesn't sound like mid '40s Benny Goodman.

Because of social media and the internet, surely there's a lot more music out there to find.   I mean, literally anybody can make music and put it out there.  However, not a lot of it is capturing the popular zeitgeist.  There isn't a lot of it selling out stadiums, either.  And I can't remember a lot of new bands hitting it out of the park surrounded by critical accolades, for that matter, especially any new rock band from the past five years.  If you think the quality of rock music now is better than 1991, then that's great.  But my view differs significantly.     
56
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Tortuga on March 13, 2019, 01:31:05 PM »
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Hereís what I mean when I hinted about the death of rockÖ 

Take the list of albums from the original post.  Many of these albums contained songs that were both all over the top 40 pop charts, and also were critically lauded.  I donít see many-if-any rock artists making the pop charts now.  And even fewer with anywhere near the critical and commercial success that rock bands did from, say, the early 1960ís through to the mid 2000ís. 

Am I saying that chart success means good quality?  No Ė thatís utterly ridiculousÖ  But the fact of the matter is, once upon a time good rock music used to touch the popular music charts with somewhat regularity.

Am I saying that thereís no new good rock and roll music out there?  Of course not.  Iím still able to find the occasional song that reaches through to me.  But itís a measurable fact that the people who tend to listen to new rock and roll music are becoming less and less. 

Iím sure there are people out there who still make good polka music.  But outside of a select subset who search that genre of music out, it may as well be nonexistent.

If what you mean by "death" is diminished popularity in mainstream culture then I have no argument with you there.  I just don't think that is a very meaningful way to determine the livelihood of something.  That's more like being sad because culture has moved on from what was popular when you were young.  That's been happening to everyone since forever.

But if what you really care about is having access to a lot of good quality rock music to listen to I absolutely disagree. 

Back in the eighties, radio and MTV were how we became aware of music.  The only way to discover Indie music was to send $9.95 to an address from an ad in the back of Rolling Stone to buy an album you had never heard a single track from.  Basically, there would be 20 to 30 songs playlisted at any given time on mainstream radio and MTV.  Of those songs, only a portion would be new releases.  That was all we could really know of in terms of new music.  Now, there are ways for niche music to find its niche audience and that has led to the growth of niche artists.  They have a way to be heard.

2018 rock music as a niche is bigger than 1980s rock as mainstream in terms of quantity and quality.

There is more recorded music now than there has ever been in the history of recorded music.  The huge hurdle of needing an expensive studio, marketing, and radio airplay is gone.  Playlists and algorithms that can fairly accurately predict what you like have replaced the A&R function of the record labels.  The number of plays elevates the music that most people find to be good music.  That is a much better predictor than an A&R guy at a record label and a few nationally syndicated program directors trying to guess what is good based on their taste alone.

This is a great time for music lovers of all genres.
57
The Band / Happy Birthday Adam!
« Last post by 73October on March 13, 2019, 11:59:50 AM »
A thread to wish Adam a very Happy Birthday.
Hope he enjoys it, because next year will be significant!
58
General Music Discussion / Re: 1991 in Music
« Last post by Vox on March 13, 2019, 11:01:33 AM »
Hereís what I mean when I hinted about the death of rockÖ 

Take the list of albums from the original post.  Many of these albums contained songs that were both all over the top 40 pop charts, and also were critically lauded.  I donít see many-if-any rock artists making the pop charts now.  And even fewer with anywhere near the critical and commercial success that rock bands did from, say, the early 1960ís through to the mid 2000ís. 

Am I saying that chart success means good quality?  No Ė thatís utterly ridiculousÖ  But the fact of the matter is, once upon a time good rock music used to touch the popular music charts with somewhat regularity.

Am I saying that thereís no new good rock and roll music out there?  Of course not.  Iím still able to find the occasional song that reaches through to me.  But itís a measurable fact that the people who tend to listen to new rock and roll music are becoming less and less. 

Iím sure there are people out there who still make good polka music.  But outside of a select subset who search that genre of music out, it may as well be nonexistent. 
59
News and Rumors / Re: 2019 subscriber gift
« Last post by bwm231163 on March 12, 2019, 01:51:31 PM »
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They will probably make us vote again, it will be contentious.

"iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE" means "iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE", and we're going to make a success of it!
60
News and Rumors / MOVED: U2 - "40' album & tour ?
« Last post by singnomore on March 12, 2019, 06:34:52 AM »
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